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I going to start by saying Thanks for all the post on this site and all the people and there input.
When I bought my bike last year I think Dennis gave me a list of things to do if I wanted to keep my bike going. Well I must say that list was pretty spot on and over the last year I think I've done all but one of the things on that list, I need to put new seals in the front struts and change the fluid.
Well back to my yellow wires, the PO had done the wires at the battery but not the plugs by the regulator. When I first start my bike it would be at 14 volts and then drop to 12 volts if I shut it off and restarted it would go back to 14. It was doing it all the time so I thought it was the stator or regulator. Today I checked it and running it of the center stand the regulator got hot and 2 of the yellow wires were hot at the plug and then the voltage would drop. I cut the plug out and sodded the wires together. Problem solved, I just got back from a nice ride in the foothills and constant 14.2 volts.
I have put 10,000 miles on that old wing in the last year and with any luck I'll get another 10,000 this year. I don't think people know how lucky we are to have this site and all the people that help perfect strangers with there bikes. Thanks to all of you. Jerry Burns :grin3:
 

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u cut the plug out and soldered ALL THE WIRES TOGETHER? mine does the same thing, sometimes 15v and then ~12.4-12.6??? I don't get that? the 3 yellow wires next to the battery have been soldered together already; I haven't looked at the regulator wires as they are under the fake gas tank. I haven't cared to take the fake gas tank cover off as I have had no real need to.


hummmm? worth the effort to take the fake gas tank cover off and check the plug/cut/solder the wires together? my soldering skills are... non existent; solder glops everywhere... but where it is supposed to be. it would be easier if they put alligator clip on the end of the soldering iron so can clip it to the wires so they get HOT and then do the soldering, using a glove to unclip the soldering iron after we have SUCCESSFULLY soldered the connection
 

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hummmm? worth the effort to take the fake gas tank cover off and check the plug/cut/solder the wires together? my soldering skills are... non existent; solder glops everywhere.


Mike... If you don't know what you are doing... DO NOTHING. Have someone else do it for you.


When it comes to electrical, don't mess around. You can't do this work with good intentions and no experience or bad work. At best you will ruin your stator and at worst... set you bike on fire.


Maybe it would be best if you found someone near you that works in the electronics field to solder the wires for you. You can have all the plastics removed and the bike ready for him/her.


I can't stress this enough. I can see how you are worried about a perfectly working clutch in another post but are un willing to properly bleed the clutch fluid to maintain the bike. Instead you are tunnel vision focusing on the clutch plates needing to be replace and the cost involved.


If you do this electrical wrong, you are into it for mega money because the engine has to come out to replace a very expensive stator pack. $$$$$$


Pleeeeeese have someone do this for you. Have someone change your clutch fluid too so your worries are over and it's done right... your clutch is fine!!! :)


Tim


PS... I had this in may garage for years! You will learn.
 

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having trouble soldering is usually more of not using the correct soldering gun,a pencil type gun doesn't cut it,using soldering paste and smaller gauge solder usually is better than the thicker stuff
 

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I think I probably know the difference between air in the line and a worn out clutch on an old bike that was NOT well maintained. the clutch is NOT spongy, it just engages at the END of the clutch handle travel... which means TO ME that the clutch pack is worn out from a heavy rider in hilly terrain. OH, I can bleed the system and see what that does... hopefully it doesn't get any worse. the bike was just NOT MAINTAINED VERY WELL. if I had known more abt this type of bike.... had more money. oh well, just ride it until it wont go anymore and park it/junk it, call it lessons learned... again. we get what we pay for
 

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there is also a possibility that the clutch line is getting old and spongy,a new line may be in order,works the same for brakelines
 
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