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Discussion Starter #41
Hey Robbnc,

If you want a Hotter Ignition, than what came stock on Our GL1000/GL1100/GL1200.

That is relatively Cheap, and very easy to install, and that is still small, space wise, in fact they are smaller than the oem GL1100 coils, but mount to the stock GL1100 mounts.

Ebay has the MP08 Coils and spark plug Wires, for approx. $35.00 + $10 shipping. That is a Great price, for a Ignition Upgrade.

And remember, at that price, you are getting, a Spare coil, to put on your shelf, because you get 3 coils, but will be using only 2 coils.

When you change to these, MP08 coils, you eliminate/remove the large ignition Resister, this provides more voltage and a hotter spark to your coil/plugs, I use the GL1500 plug wires, But, If you are using your stock plug wires, you can remove the resisters in the NGK plugs ends on your wires, this will also help increase voltage through put, = hotter spark.

These Coils run very cool on my bike, and never get over ambient temperature. I have pulled over after a Fast run putting a big load on them, no heat.

I will have to test them again, for any heat, they should be cool like before, with this new 32DFT Single carb conversion, to verify temp again, and make sure nothing has changed.

Or there is always the Ultimate Ignition, the C5 Ignition system, But it is $500.00, and to pricey for my pocket.

But the C5 gets rid of Points on a GL1000, get rid of the elect. spark units on GL1100/GL1200, and they have them for GL1500 too.

The C5 Ignition electronically advances/Retards the system, better than stock, But $500.00, if they were around $200. they might be more in line.

I would suggest going to the GL1500 MP08 coils, they have them on Ebay.

Try to get the Spark Plug wires with them.

For the Spark Plug wires, if they look, crappy when you get them, (Mine did, they look Old) I take some Old Brake Fluid, and wipe it on the wires, wipe it off, they will look like Brand New!!

I take the rag that i wiped them wires down with and wipe the coils too, Old Brake Fluid is a great cleaner for rubber products.

Old or New Brake Fluid, & even ATF (Automatic Trans Fluid) is also a great cleaner of rubber.

When you buy them for a GL1500 (6 cylinder engine) you get 3 coils you will only need two of the coils for this conversion, that will give you a spare coil for the shelf or prosperity.

The Mp08 coils are Hotter than what are stock on our bike's and the coil wires are usualy better than what is on our oldwings also.

You will get a Hotter Spark,
That you can see, when you are testing them, Lights out in shop/garage, spark plug out, & jumping fire to the engine block.

These coils are also a little smaller than our coils, as they are wound differently, and use a different Small more compact core, but produce more energy, and are a better unit, technology keeps advancing.

Note;
pic#3 Stock Coil on GL1100 is the Large Coil, Stock GL1500 MP08 coil is the smaller coil, the Ballast resistor has been removed, and is no longer wired in.
Pic#4 Shows Mounting the MP08 Coils to the GL1100 OEM Coil Mounts, and using a couple of flat washers as spacers
I usually clean all connections here then apply dielectric grease and tighten all coil connections using a pair of small pliers and squeeze them till they push on tighter
I also remove any/all corrosion off of coil terminals.


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Discussion Starter #42
Removing the Ballast Resister.

Pic#1 shows the small easy to make mounting bracket.
Pic#2 is Used/New to you, GL1500 MP08 Coils Mounted, On your Old GL1000/GL1100/GL1200, Use you Old Oem coil Mounts that came on your Bike stock. Dont try to use the GL1500 Coil Mounts that came with the new to you MP08 Coils, remove the Mp08 coils and mount them to your coil mounts on you bike now.
pic#2 also shows the small bracket that need to be made for mounting.
The Green Wire in Picture#2 is the Ground to frame, clean corrosion off before installing
Pic#5 shows Ballast Resister removed, and wired, soldered and shrink sleeving on wiring
pic#6 shows Ballast Resister being removed and new connection after removal.

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Discussion Starter #43
With this Hotter! Ignition,

And with the New Single Carb, Conversion your Bike should Run as Good as it possibly can, as long as all maintenance has been taken care of.

You will have a Good, Ignition, Better than stock, and a Good/Great Carb. Induction system.

You can also up your voltage flow by using a relay to the igniton straight from the Battery to get full voltage by adding a relay and re-wiring direct from your battery to the coils instead, of stock routing through the ignition, and other switches.

Just need to intercept the black wire from the ignition switch and put a relay inline.
At the same time, you can replace the glass fuse panel with a blade fuse type panel.

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Discussion Starter #44
Another Way is putting a relay in the line from the ignition switch that powers the fuse block.
When I check voltage at the coils compared to the battery voltage, there is only a .1 volt difference, This should be better than stock, so this may be better Than the coil relay mod. Listed above, On my bike anyway.
Power for the coils is still going through the kill switch so I suppose there might be some slight benefit to a relay listed above, for some but I'm not going to add another part of potential failure on mine.

After adding the fuse block relay my lights got noticeably brighter.
What prompted me in the first place to do this was I read so many guys with problems after the ignition switch, traced back to a corroded contact in the switch and sometimes overheated.
That and I replaced the fuse block with blade fuses because the glass fuses were getting hot from loose connections.

After doing these mods I see no reason to add more parts that could fail (relays) in the lighting circuits.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Remember that a relay is just an electrical switch that only draws around 200ma to activate. The relay ( switch) should be the last thing in the circuit before the device that you want to operate so that there is no current draw( voltage drop) through the switching circuit and length of run. So if placed correctly in the circuit we now only have 200ma running through the ignition switch and kill switch or the headlight high/Lo switch and on- off switch. So as you can imagine worn switches or dirty contacts are not a problem when they are only switching 200ma. Unfortunately for the headlight circuit you need 1 relay for high beam and another relay for low beam.
 

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No, I haven't actually run the two carbs on the manifolds.
I've calculated the carbs on paper to work just fine needing only tuning.
I designed and drew the manifolds up ...then had the carb bases/plenums cut (much in the way that the coolant chambers were drew, cut and then welded) and assembled to the tubes and flanges.
I've the bores horizontal to the bikes centerline.
Each carburetor is outbound of vertical in relation to being directly above the cylinder head port openings.
I've no tapering of the intake tracts. Not enough room to worry about it.
Not using throttle linkage, but cables. BMW cables.

I use a single Prime fuel filter. P/N 7-02357-1 Small, clear and high quality stone filter. I place it before my fuel pump (electric) so whatever cut loose did so after the filter. My tank is rust-free and clean, so nothing came from that. I normally never write-off a event like hydro-lock, but that one instance got wrote-off as bad Karma for another undetermined reason. Not worth figuring out since the carb was new and not suspected.

You know, my original intent for using a single carburetor was to:
1) get the bike running and,
2) keep it running simply and reliably.
I feel that I've gone as far as I can with that.
Running two carburetors defeats my original intent and is just a novelty to me at this point. I also believe that I have more overall performance with my single carburetor on my manifold compared to two identical carburetors positioned indirectly over the cylinder head port openings using the available intake tract lengths ...that are shorter than stock. There is simply nothing left to tune in fuel delivery to the chambers for any RPM other than what the chambers themselves, and the carburetors, can muster from their design.

I realize that many presume two carbs are better than one in overall performance. My experience has one carburetor being better than two in using any combination of carburetors for overall performance, reliability and ease of maintenance.

You are on fantastic road of finding these results as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Another way to have brighter head lights without the High power draw is.

The easiest way is two relays one to switch high beam and one to switch low beam so that the high current draw is now between the battery and the headlight filaments.

This way, you draw direct from the battery, so that your Lights will be brighter,
with Minimum power draw,

because you will not be going through all that resistance, like long wires, switches, ignition, loosing power as it goes till it finally reaches the lights
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Thanks for the Info CM85,

I Agree with you 100%, on the reliability the Simplicity!!! of only one Carb it is Awesome, I am sure the test ride will prove it.

My thought was,

I am going to build a Reverse Trike this Winter, I have th stock carb rack for the GL1200 donor, But will be doing a conversion, probably a Single carb. 32dft

I have 90% of what I need right now, wheel base is SHORT! same as or less than stock GL1200, Seat Height is LOW!, Lower than GL1200.

While I like the Single Carb. for added Engine Torque, just what I need for a Trike build, and it may just what I need, I was thinking Options,

As the seating on the trike will be a single seat, Centered, that will be right over the GL1200 transmission, the single carb conversion maybe best, as i will have Less obstructions over the head area, as i will wrap my legs around that carb to get to the foot rest's and pedals, this is how i am to keep it short and Low, and hopefully very sporty.

Dual carbs may be more in the way, of my legs.

Goal is, same weight or lower than 84' Naked GL1200 Goldwing.

A very simple, Custom frame.

I have 3 rear suspension options for this trike.
1. Stock GL1200 rear swing arm, converted to Pull Type progressive Shocks, like one the HD Rear suspensions as they are hidden under the frame.
2. GL1500 rear swing arm, wheel and drive
3. GL1800 alum. Proarm, mono shock, wheel & drive.
Stock Oem GL1200 are compression shocks and need a top high mounted frame to attach to, these wont do,
AS the back of this trike is to be LOW!

A 10 Gallon gas tank.

Independent Front Suspension, w/ disc brakes


No, I haven't actually run the two carbs on the manifolds.
I've calculated the carbs on paper to work just fine needing only tuning.
I designed and drew the manifolds up ...then had the carb bases/plenums cut (much in the way that the coolant chambers were drew, cut and then welded) and assembled to the tubes and flanges.
I've the bores horizontal to the bikes centerline.
Each carburetor is outbound of vertical in relation to being directly above the cylinder head port openings.
I've no tapering of the intake tracts. Not enough room to worry about it.
Not using throttle linkage, but cables. BMW cables.

I use a single Prime fuel filter. P/N 7-02357-1 Small, clear and high quality stone filter. I place it before my fuel pump (electric) so whatever cut loose did so after the filter. My tank is rust-free and clean, so nothing came from that. I normally never write-off a event like hydro-lock, but that one instance got wrote-off as bad Karma for another undetermined reason. Not worth figuring out since the carb was new and not suspected.

You know, my original intent for using a single carburetor was to:
1) get the bike running and,
2) keep it running simply and reliably.
I feel that I've gone as far as I can with that.
Running two carburetors defeats my original intent and is just a novelty to me at this point. I also believe that I have more overall performance with my single carburetor on my manifold compared to two identical carburetors positioned indirectly over the cylinder head port openings using the available intake tract lengths ...that are shorter than stock. There is simply nothing left to tune in fuel delivery to the chambers for any RPM other than what the chambers themselves, and the carburetors, can muster from their design.

I realize that many presume two carbs are better than one in overall performance. My experience has one carburetor being better than two in using any combination of carburetors for overall performance, reliability and ease of maintenance.

You are on fantastic road of finding these results as well.
 

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West, your MP-08 coils are the same coils I'm using in my "VFR single coil per cylinder" coil thread.
Me = 4 each of coils, wires and boots in excellent condition from a $30 (shipped) eBay purchase meant for a VFR 800.

While true that there is more spark energy available and on-tap for delivery to the plug gap, I urge you strongly test further in using no primary resistance at all if using the factory triggering set-up and realize that using very little, or no secondary resistance increase the chances for flyback into the primary windings dramatically. Uncontrolled flyback voltages may have you shopping for another trigger.

C5 Ignitions is a obvious exercise in marketing...

The missing "Black Box" of a C5 Ignition is not reality. Dyna knows it and so must Power Arc.
Power Arc (reseller C5 Ignitions) has their "Black Box" mounted in much the same way that Dyna has their "S" module Hall scheme managed; within the module and on the plate.
Many Dyna "S" modules have failed due to overheating because of it.
Money to Burn?

My opinion is this: no street-driven, stock "daily-rider" GL1000 will see any benefit in using a optical trigger no matter how its signal is managed. There is no need to retard timing electronically for starting and no need for performance ramp curves that a factory camshaft cannot support. Their own warranty supports this.
Their "performance" seat-of-the-pants increase comes from the coil characteristics. You can get that "seat-of-the-pants" performance increase from your $30 coils if you load them safely.
Pauls tower coil thread is another good option.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
- - - Ride Report - - -

For starters pre-ride Inspection.

Bike has had Fuel pumped up to the carb. as i can see it in the clear fuel filter's, They are Both, full of fuel.

No Hydrolock, Bull shlivokie, occurrences!! that to me is Great!!, it's been two days.

Took a short Test ride of 25 miles, I wanted to get back home to check the bike over.

No leaks, at all.

After 25 mile ride, stopped engine, let it sit for 1 minute, then restarted it, It started Instantly.

Besides it feels like it is almost 100 degrees out.

Start up,
Starting is very easy and very fast, you don't expect it to start as Fast as it does, it is surprising, and it just runs effortlessly, re-starts are just the same very fast start, "surprisingly fast, or Instant start " is the best way to describe it.

Take off from a stop,
I have to say it feels Torquey, Like a torquey big twin cyl. bike, If you dont know what this is like, a Better description is like a GL1500 6-cylinder Goldwing, in many ways.

Riding The bike,
I rode through a curvy stretch of road, with speeds around some curves as low as 25mph, & 35mph, with some long straight away's


First off, it gets away from a stop better than before, with out a doubt, it is Torquey, you will not need to be shifting as often, this thing is TORQUEY!!, It can pull really well from 2500rpm and up, I went around a 25mph turn without down shifting, powered out of the turn at 2k rpm no problem, No lugging at all, it just went, so the next turn was also 25 mph did not down shift I was In 4th gear at 1800rpm, it pulled out of it, Now it has more power/torque, up in the 2000-2500rpm range, But if i tried 1800rpm in 4th gear, it would not be real happy with the {OEM-4 anchor}.

In the normal riding around it feels like a GL1500 6cyl. as it has good torque, and you shift less often and can power away from a turn at a lower RPM.
On my GL1500 I would not try to power out of a turn at 1800rpm in fourth gear, All the GL1500's that i have had likes 2k and above in that high of a gear

Now riding the GL1100 with carb, conversion at 2500rpm and up, it is in the bikes really good power curve, as you will have all the power you need.

It is fun to ride because it is easier to ride.

In the straight away's, there were 3 of them.
I did Not do any standing starts.

I mainly did high gear roll on's, and bike did well,

On primary only, bike was fine, plenty of power, add the secondary, and you are accelerating faster than with just the primary alone.
also open the secondary, and you have that V8 4-barrel distinct sound that the stock carb rack sorry {OEM-4 anchor} DONT HAVE! I need to use the correct reference.

I took it from 30mph to 90mph and it got up to 90mph fast, over all it was very good, first Ride.

When i was accelerating from 30mph to 90mph I had it full throttle, I let off at 90MPH, it was still going, If i had to guess, it would have done over 100 easily.

It was not running out of power at all.

That's at about 98 degrees

Next Ride will be in the morning, when it is cooler,

I will actually ride it more, like a Stock 4 Carb rack version of GL1100, I will go through the gears more and ride it more aggressively.

Oh, also there was absolutely NO hesitation or bogging at all any where in the throttle or any time while riding.

No spitting through the carb at all, it is a VERY easy and Well Mannered bike to ride now

_________________________________
 

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Discussion Starter #51
I noticed that while riding on my Rock driveway, it has a good amount of rock it is a about a 200ft long drive way, I need to be very cautious with the throttle, with this new Single carb. conversion, as it is torquey.

It had no problem getting the rear tire loose.

Some pics
 

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West, I just want to clarify exactly what our 32DFT is.

It is a: Weber 32 DFTA-1

The DFT is all but USA.
The DFTA designates it as a USA-specific carburetor (A as in America)
The DFTA-1 designates it as a FORD-specific carburetor (-1 as in Motorcraft)

Ford requires it as a Motorcraft product because it is not manufactured by them.
Motorcraft gives it the model designation - 740

It was manufactured by Carter under Webers patent rights (and partial ownership) using their 32DFT patent, specifically for Ford and their vehicles and has a additional vacuum port because of it, for a total of three vac ports.
Additional bolt-ons make up the difference between the DFT and the DFTA or DFTA-1.

Any and All WEBER 32DFT literature is applicable to this Motorcraft 740 carburetor.

Haynes "Weber Carburetors" lists the carburetor in chapter 10 which includes the 32 DFT, DFTA and DFTA-1 (aka: our Motorcraft 740)
I have it in .pdf for D/L

Carter has no designation for the carburetor. Carter was a partnered company during this era, hence "Carter/Weber" amongst others.

The throat entrances of both venturi's are 32mm (as you've accurately measured)
The chokes of both venturi's are 22mm (as embossed on the carburetor body pic'd below)
The circled 1 says it's a DFTA-1 (also below)

This small 22mm choke size makes this carburetor perform as it does.
_____________________

FWIW - Page 22 of the manual shows where to block off the chokes base plate signal. Block that port opening and you'll have to do nothing up at the opening between the three screws where the choke housing use to be.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Hey CM85

That is some good info.

you say you have the Haynes "Weber Carburetors" lists the carburetor in chapter 10 which includes the 32 DFT, DFTA and DFTA-1 (aka: our Motorcraft 740)
I have it in .pdf for D/L

I would like to down load this info.

to be able to see Page 22 of the manual that shows where to block off the chokes base plate signal. Block that port opening so I'll have to do nothing up at the opening between the three screws where the choke housing use to be.
 

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All I did for that opening behind the electric choke was run a screw back in there and my carb s working perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
I built a block off plate, for mine.

The screw idea sounds, good, i did not know that hole was threaded.

I checked mine for vacuum leaks when i got it started, a couple of times,

on all parts of the new system and also this vacuum port area,

by spraying starting fluid at every part including new Hose connections, base of carb, to see if there was any engine RPM speed up or slow down in engine RPM's.

There are no leaks.

But Knowledge is good, since this carb is on my bike, And I like it.

I would like to know as much as possible, about it, it may help me some day.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Fuel in Tank, was approx. 4-6 months Old, and was Not fresh gas.

I did have some Stabil in the gas, But I am not sure how good of a job that does, and i dont like to rely on that.

I also had about 4 ounces of ATF in the gas, I trust AFT more than Stabil for keeping gas fresh

another Really good gas stabilizer is the blue stuff,

I like this one the best, out of store bought stuff,
Star brite® Star Tron® - Enzyme Fuel Treatment

I think this is better than Stabil, just my Opinion though

I ran out of the "Star brite® Star Tron® - Enzyme Fuel Treatment" and had to use what i had.

I think I am down to a half tank

I will fill it up with some fresh Premium gas, this morning.

It Ran really good yesterday even though the gas was not fresh
 

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I'll have to put chapter 10 of the Haynes manual on my Google drive.
I've taken down my web pages, so this is how I'll be shuffling manuals until I get my new site up and running.

The Ford manual (page 22) shows where to plug the base port opening. The choke vacuum is tested at the bottom of the base and is shown on that page. It doesn't matter how the vacuum is stopped. Any of the ways we're doing seem to work. A lead plug there would keep fabricating labor to a minimum. Rob's screw approach is even simpler. I went with the o-ring and bracket for the manual choke conversion. As you are finding out, actually choking the carb for a easy start is not necessary anyway. Who would believe it? ...so I made the mount.

I'll try and get the relevant Haynes chapter up soon and post the link to it as before.

As for the icing issue I experience, I'm fairly certain you'll have to wait for colder weather to experience it yourself. You'll know it is happening when stumbling and hesitation rears its ugly head. As I've tried to explain, heating the manifold does little, if any, good in preventing it. It is not a manifold issue. A heated manifold tract helps greatly in trying to defeat the effects of it though. The small choke size is the physical contributor.
Heating the carburetor body, heating the inlet air or heating the fuel attempts to prevent the icing. I heat the intake air and will be heating the fuel before winter hits.
If you won't be riding in near-freezing temps, then you may not find much issue with it. My experience with the icing was consistent. On the road, ...it would happen under high vacuum conditions such as sitting at a red light. Upon take-off it would stumble bad. If cruising with low RPM it would form as vacuum would stabilize to the higher side when load would go to a minimum and hesitation would happen when throttled up.
Wide Open Throttle (hitting the secondary momentarily) would clear the ice enough to get drivability back ...temporarily.
Some form of carburetor, NOT manifold, heat is required supplemental to manifold heat to combat the icing issue THAT I HAVE. You guys may have a different experience based on where you live. Southern latitudes may not see much at all. Northwest from the center of the Country and northern latitudes may see it frequently and consistently.
I don't know how else to describe the icing issue. If experienced it is an easy fix to add radiator waste heat to the carb through a air filter housing and some simple ducting. It doesn't take a lot of heat, but it does take whatever it takes for the worst conditions you plan to experience after whatever initial experience presents itself.
Again, stumbling and hesitation are the giveaways that ice is forming, ...not carburetor malfunction.

You guys are doing great. Keep up the work and pass it along as best you can. Teamwork is not my strong-point.
 

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Depending on your rides are designed and if feasible to bring heated header air up via ducting.

You can do like what every carb equipped car had and that was a vacuum operated hot air door closed to draw up header heat, which the 1500 has.

Bi metal spring vacuum switch in air cleaner housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
That is what i was thinking.

Currently I have Removed the steel Radiator Heat shield cover,

That is in between the Radiator and the Engine,

Installed the upper motor mounts Braces & cross brace only.

This allows the Heat from the radiator a straight shot to the carb intake.

I have put a switch on the Radiator fan, If i run into a freeze situation,

flip a toggle switch to turn the fan on ride with fan on for the short cold mornings runs.

But some exhaust header heat, would be a good way to do it.
Like VW and 914 Porsche do.
 

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Depending on your rides are designed and if feasible to bring heated header air up via ducting.

You can do like what every carb equipped car had and that was a vacuum operated hot air door closed to draw up header heat, which the 1500 has.

Bi metal spring vacuum switch in air cleaner housing.
I've based my current intake air pre-heating loosely on VW's scheme, which is what you've mentioned.
VW/Porsche haves a diverter/flapper box that I'm also using for reference.
Exhaust heat is a good source but not easily piped to a intake once my fairing lowers are in place. There's a nice "cool" factor in its looks, just not easily done. I've found it easier to get it from the radiator.

I'm now (as time permits) experimenting with a remote oil cooler whose sole purpose would be to heat the intake air. Once I get all of the correct parts I will go this route permanently.

Lots of options in getting it done. Some snowmobile manufacturers heat the carb bodies via coolant. Not much we can do with that, but I know why they do it...
 

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