Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Hi Folks!

I am having a problem with my GL1000. Sometimes I take it out and it runs great!... then after I have been on the road for a few minutes, it seems to bog down with me barely able to hit 3500 rpms. This sometimes clears up, but the last couple times I have had to drive like this for an hour or so.

It seems to happen after a fill up.

In addition, I seem to be able to smell gas, and my mileage drops in half. I also seem to be stalling out unless I keep it revving at stops?

My first thought was fuel filter, but why more gas usage?

Thanks fellow wingmen!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
415 Posts
imported post

Change the fuel filter then run some SEAFOAM in a tank of gasoline. It will still run poor for a while as the SEAFOAM cleans the system and send all the "crap" to the cylinders for combustion.
The can will tell how much to use, but I have used an entire 12 ounce can in 5 gallons of gas with no ill effects.
Keep us posted on this problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

THANKS KC9!

WHERE DO I GET THIS "SEAFOAM"... ALSO FORGOT TO MENTION THE OCCASIONAL BACK FIRE?.... I ASSUME THAT DOESN'T CHANGE ANYTHING

D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
imported post

Can be either carbs or ignition. Seafoam can be purchased at many auto parts stores and sometimes even Walmart. It does a great job of cleaning out the fuel system while riding.

The backfire - when does this happen? When going full throttle to close throttle? That would probably be air cutoffs in the carbs. Other than that, missing could still be ignition. What shape are the plugs in? The coils? The wires?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
imported post

BACKFIRE OCCURS WHEN THROTTLING UP AND ALSO WHEN I DOWNSHIFT. IT IS NOT MISSING... HOW DO I CHECK THE AIR CUTOFFS IN THE CARBS?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
imported post

unfortunately, the carb rack must come off to access them.

here is a link about the cutoffs and what they do:
http://www.randakks.com/TechTip3.htm

There are some detailed instructions floating around to rebuild the carbs, I would highly suggest a look into it.
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2952
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3372
http://www.ngwclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12168

I wish you welcome to this site! I've learned tons here, some others are real gurus!

ps: please don't use all capital letters, it makes it hard to read.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
786 Posts
imported post

brianinmaine wrote:
Can be either carbs or ignition.
I agree, and it could be both, though it sounds like you definitely have ignition problems to me. The backfire thing is tricky business, as the cutoff valve is there to prevent it, but I find that the other factors; loss of power, mileage loss, etc. are the more important aspects to concentrate on. If you can pull to 8000rpm and get +/- 40 mpg and it backfires, who cares?:cooldevil:
Not the case here, but that cutoff valve doesn't do much for performance really. It enriches the mixture on deceleration to prevent backfire, it shouldn't affect mileage, ability to get past 4K, etc. to a significant degree.
I suggest running it as hard as you can and then pulling the plugs to have a look at what's firing/ what's not. A tap with the back of the hand to the individual exhaust headers tells you which one is running cold as well. (It's an acquired art!)

My bet is that you will find some cylinders that aren't firing, and then it's time to answer brianinmaine's questions regarding the shape of the plug wires, coils, etc.
You'll get there...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
415 Posts
imported post

I had a similar problem where it was hunting and bogging down, trying not to stop at lights and keeping the revs up. I suspected fuel but was pointed in the ignition direction on here.
After taking apart and cleaning the main earth and double checking and cleaning up the main block connectors its gone
Good luck with yours
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
imported post

ok.... help me ... how do I check out the electronics.... main block connectors?.... and where is the "main earth?"



Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
imported post

unfortunately, the carb rack must come off to access them

This would depend on what year the GL1000 is, I know a 75 has one cut off and is easy to access if you remove the air cleaner housing. in fact the manual says to r"remove the air cut off valve " to facilitate carb assy removal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
imported post

It is a 1979... do you know of a site with pics & instructions?... the bike is new to me..





thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
415 Posts
imported post

I don't know about the 1000 but for the 1100 follow the negative from the battery and it takes you to the engine mount. I thought mine was clean and really tight but when I was told to take it apart I found the corrosion.
I would just start taking apart any block connectors you can find and clean them with a file and some contact cleaner. Thats what I did. I'm no expert tho
good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
imported post

kingarthurup
check you're private messages !there is something that may help you . alot ! ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
imported post

If your fuel milage has really dropped by half, you may also want to check for a sticky float valve in one or more of the carbs... :gunhead:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
imported post

Thanks Scott!

Just got in the mood to tear into the bike (in my garage)and I received your PM... wow... You read me like a BOOK...:) It is something I really needed... you guys are great!...

KICK ASS RUDY!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
imported post

Shooter wrote:
If your fuel milage has really dropped by half, you may also want to check for a sticky float valve in one or more of the carbs... :gunhead:
This was my thought also.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
imported post

Terry,

Wouldn't a sticky float stick more when the engine is cold?... this is the opposite of what seems to be happening to me... if not, how do I check it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
imported post

Them carbs won't know cold from hot as far as a sticking float needle, which you may or may not have. Sounds to me like your dropping the ignition somewhere along the line. If a float was sticking, even two of them, and you're riding for an hour straight, then you'd be burning enough fuel to not notice. Too much fuel shouldn't prevent a 3.5K RPM limit. Too little ignition would.

Check the resistors in them sparkplug caps. Deceptive little bastigees.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
imported post

I'm not familiar with the GL1000 per se so I'm really just theorizing based on my experience with my CB750. It was running rich and burbled like mad when I'd open the throttle. Mileage was under 30 when it should've been mid 40's. I had 3 floats with leaks. They were brass and I fixed 2 of them after blowing up the first one - replaced it with plastic one. Another thing that happened was the needle valve wore a dimple in the part of the float it contacted and the needle was sticking in the dimple - a common problem on the 750. The fix is to either file out the dimple if it's not too deep or melt some solder in the dimple and file it flat. I don't know if, on the 1000, it's possible to see fuel level without removing the carbs from the bike. In my case I took them off and got all the sticking solved and the levels set on the bench using kerosene instead of gasoline - for safety reasons.
One reason I suspect over-fueling is backfires when travelling at speed. That sounds like unburned fuel getting to the exhaust. You should get the bike going at a "problem" speed for a while, shut it off quickly and check the plugs for rich running. That'd be pretty easy to check. Just be careful not to buggar up the plug threads - easy to do with hot aluminum.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,716 Posts
imported post

ALWAYS , yes i mean ALWAYS , be sure your ignitionsystem works 100% correct , before working on the carbs .
This problem you have ,COULD be the points needing replacement / adjusting (must be done ewery 10.000 miles or so ) , and is a little difficult to do real good , without the rigth tools and knowhow !
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top