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Discussion Starter #1
I've been struggling with this split timing thing. I've used a static timing once, and that was on a CB750 when I put Dyna ignition.(I use dynamic more often )
This is a 1977 GL1000 with points.
So, following the manual. Get F-1 to align with the case, and the light comes on when hooked on parallel for (Cyl 1 and 2). Timing is correct.
Same with Cyl 3 and 4 with F-2 aligns with the case.
And yes, the points gap is adjusted.

Now with Randakk's method of split timing. This I guess is all confusing with all the degrees that involved.

Could someone walk me through the steps?

Thank you
 

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I've been struggling with this split timing thing. I've used a static timing once, and that was on a CB750 when I put Dyna ignition.(I use dynamic more often )
This is a 1977 GL1000 with points.
So, following the manual. Get F-1 to align with the case, and the light comes on when hooked on parallel for (Cyl 1 and 2). Timing is correct.
Same with Cyl 3 and 4 with F-2 aligns with the case.
And yes, the points gap is adjusted.

Now with Randakk's method of split timing. This I guess is all confusing with all the degrees that involved.

Could someone walk me through the steps?

Thank you
It's only needed if your light is coming on at a different point the next time the fly wheel comes back around then you "split the difference." Sounds like you're good to go.
 

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Mine both time without going through the exercise just like yours. So just time it & ignore the far out stuff.
 

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To clarify, pull the plugs to make it easier and give you more control, set it right on at F1, carefully make one revolution to F1 again. As you're coming up to F1 slow down and watch if the light comes on right at F1 on that second revolution. I have never had one that did. If it doesn't match, you " split the difference " one revolution a little early, the next revolution a little late.

Before doing this mine would sound like a bad rod when taking off from a stop and clatter at idle pretty good. Kind of a nuisance but worth the improvement.
 

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The bike will run without doing the split timing, but as mentioned, it will run MUCH better if you do it. Check it on F1 and F2, plugs out, 'static' method. Take your time, its well worth it!!

ADDED: I'm only a few towns over. If you want, PM me your number.


Bill
 

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what is being compensated for? timing will be same every rotation unless there is wear or poor quality control. sounds like something needs fixed rather than "put it there, it'll do."
 

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Applies to Dyna as well as points. Theory is the cam is flexing. Don't know. Do know that split timing when you have this issue helps low rpm performance.
 

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To clarify, pull the plugs to make it easier and give you more control, set it right on at F1, carefully make one revolution to F1 again. As you're coming up to F1 slow down and watch if the light comes on right at F1 on that second revolution. I have never had one that did. If it doesn't match, you " split the difference " one revolution a little early, the next revolution a little late.

Before doing this mine would sound like a bad rod when taking off from a stop and clatter at idle pretty good. Kind of a nuisance but worth the improvement.
Put the light next to the timing port. It makes it a lot easier to she the timing mark alignment when the light comes on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Maybe I am just overthinking all of this. Like I said, I always used dynamic testing on my bikes.
So, are these the steps Randakk is talking about?
http://www.randakksblog.com/ignition-quirks-split-timing-technique/


(From older post here)
1. Set the .4mm gap for the left and right points at the high point of the shaft
2. Adjust the main base plate static timing such that the #1 cylinder fires a little before the F1 mark.
3. Check the left point gap on either high point of the shaft and adjust the left point as necessary to get a .4mm gap.
4. Rotate the crank 360 degrees until the F1 mark appears again and adjust the main base plate such that the #2 cylinder fires a little after the F1 mark.
5. Check the left point gap on either high point of the shaft and adjust the left point as necessary to get a .4mm gap.
6. Rotate the crank 180 degrees until the F2 mark aligns with the case marks and adjust the sub plate such that the #3 cylinder fires.
7. Check the left and right point gaps on either high point of the shaft and adjust them as necessary to get a .4mm gap.
8. Rotate the crank 360 degrees until the F2 mark aligns with the case marks and adjust the sub plate such that the #4 cylinder fires.
9. Check the left and right point gaps on either high point of the shaft and adjust them as necessary to get a .4mm gap.


When I try to get one cylinder fires before F-1, and the second after F2 the base plate for 1-2 angled too much. Like about 40 degrees from the mark on points cover Honda used.
 

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Maybe I am just overthinking all of this. Like I said, I always used dynamic testing on my bikes.
So, are these the steps Randakk is talking about?
http://www.randakksblog.com/ignition-quirks-split-timing-technique/
Those are the steps. If all your cylinders are firing on the mark like you said in your fist post, there's no need to worry about any of this. It's only used if you have a set of cylinders that won't time correctly and instead of having one fire on the mark and the other fire many degrees behind, you adjust so that one fires a few degrees before the mark so that the other fires not quite so far behind.
If you'd rather time dynamically, you'll either need a sight glass that screws into the timing hole or Randakks has an over priced wheel or you can use this pattern to make your own. http://www.machinerycleanery.com/MachineryCleaneryUniversalTimingDisc.jpg
 

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The problem for most who do static timing is that they never go to the F1 mark again after setting the first mark. Thinking that T1 is T1 is T1. They don't realize the cam can flex or is slightly askew. I think it would show up on a light as moving mark, but hard to see. The flywheel is moving rather fast, first right on the mark, then a little off.

The reason to check this is if your bike has a knock sound when taking off at low rpm or climbing a grade slowly at low rpm. I had to read the article twenty times to finally get what it was saying, and my first bike sounded terrible until I did this.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Alright, some updates on the timing.
At first, I really couldn't get the split timing right. I decided to run the engine, and adjust the timing till I get the sweet spot. It worked. But are the highest points on the crankshaft identical?
Anyway, just ordered a Dyna ignition with the 3 ohms coils and new Reg/Rec combo (My reg is desd alright). Is the ballast still necessary? some say yes, some say no.


Has anyone tried to install the Motogadget on these bikes?


I installed them on a CB750 and XS650, and I love them.
 

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Alright, some updates on the timing.
At first, I really couldn't get the split timing right. I decided to run the engine, and adjust the timing till I get the sweet spot. It worked. But are the highest points on the crankshaft identical?
Anyway, just ordered a Dyna ignition with the 3 ohms coils and new Reg/Rec combo (My reg is desd alright). Is the ballast still necessary? some say yes, some say no.


Has anyone tried to install the Motogadget on these bikes?


I installed them on a CB750 and XS650, and I love them.
There is only 1 high point on the point cam lobe. The reason for the split timing is the valve spring pressure can distort the camshaft and make it different depending on which valves are open. With the dyna ignition you won't have to worry about that. The dyna people would be the ones to ask if you need a ballast resistor or not.
I don't know what a motogadget is.
 

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My bikes with Dyna's show it also as have the other bikes I've helped time. Hall effect is different than points, but a change in the distance can move the point where the magnetic signal registers. It also slight alters the degree at which the rotor is.
 

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Your camshaft bearing journals have a 0.006" clearance limit and the dynamics of the shaft/journals being turned with and without oil pressure are very different.

Just food for thought.
 
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