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I am rebuilding an 82 1100 my wife got me for Christmas. I was finally able to try starting it and of course my thought of having to go through the carbs was made a reality. I pulled them and started taking them apart and cleaning them. My first question is; What does the pilot screw do? The manual just says to turn it in until it seats and note the number of turns to ensure original positioning. Remove it and the spring, washerand O-ring. Well, I tried to screw it out just to get it moving, and then tried turning it in and the dang thing broke off. I have not tried the other three carbs for fear of doing the same. HELP!!! And 2, the float valves in carbs 1 and 3 were glued shut. Should these be replaced or is a good cleaning enough? It's amazing that this bike started and ran just on cylinders 2 & 4. Itwould not idle, but still very impressive...

Sorry, I know it's late on a sunday night, but thanks for any help you can offer.
 

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Pilot Jets: Pilot jets control the low-speed and idle mixtures. Many times an adjustable jet is used in conjunction with the pilot jet. The adjustable jet allows a precise setting of the idle mixture. If the adjustable jet is located to the rear of the carburetor and usually on one side it is a AIR adjustment. It controls the amount of air that mixes with the fuel coming from the pilot jet. If the adjustable jet is to the front of the carburetor, on the side or bottom, it controls the amount of air/fuel mixture going into the engine. In either case if adjusting the mixture screw won't improve the low-end running speed it's time for a different pilot jet.
 

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The pilot screw controls either air or fuel on the idle circuit. At idle, the main jet and needle have little if any effect on the mixture. The more the throttle is opened, the less affect the idle circuit has on the overall mixture.

On air controlled carbs, turning the screw in (clockwise) will reduce the amount of air flowing through, making the idle mixture richer. It will also reduce the idle speed. On fuel controlled carbs, turning the screw in will lean out the mixture, but normally doesn't affect idle speed much at all. The industry standard setting is 1.5-2 turns out. Turn the screw in until resistance is felf, then back it out that number of turns. The individual engine, exhaust, ect will effect the actual number of turns needed to get it to run right. P.S. DON'T tighten it down hard!
 

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hope it help's did a google search that's the best answer i can find, you will probally need to rebuild them anyway's,
you can buy the complete kit pretty cheap, then sync the carbs
 

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Thanks drking.
Is there a good place online to find these kits? All I can find are seal kits or jet kits, but nothing I'v seen includes the pilot screw. Another problem is getting the old screw out of the carbs as they all seem to be stuck. Is this something I can do without taking apart and cleaning? Or is this pretty important to overall performance? I would hate to break them all and have to find a machinist to remove them. Thanks...
 

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Tired Rider wrote:
Thanks drking.
Is there a good place online to find these kits? All I can find are seal kits or jet kits, but nothing I'v seen includes the pilot screw. Another problem is getting the old screw out of the carbs as they all seem to be stuck. Is this something I can do without taking apart and cleaning? Or is this pretty important to overall performance? I would hate to break them all and have to find a machinist to remove them. Thanks...
It's actually quite important to overall performance. So much so that I'll offer the following advice.

Give Andrew over at Classic Cycle Parts a shout. For around $400, you send them your carb deck, they strip it down to the bodies, electrostatic clean them, throw away everything that was removed and replace it with Honda spec parts, bench balance them, and send them back to you.

All that's left to do is mount, sync, and ride.

Trust me, it'll be money better spent, and alot less time scratching your head, or banging it on the workbench.
 

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I agree with Mike. (Id do that if I had the Bucks and needed it.) Only got to get me a new tire on the 4th. :)
Nightrider1
 

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turn the carbs upside down and shoot the idle screws with some pb blaster overnight. sometimes you have to move them back and forth just a little bit till they finally loosen up. JB
 

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Nightrider1 wrote:
Are you firing OK on all 4 cylinders?
Nightrider1
Sory, just got up. No, only 2 and 4 were firing. 1 and 3 the float valves were glued shut, no fuel to those cylinders at all. I did take the bowls of of 1 and 3, took the valves apart and got them clean and workingwell, just not sure if the valve will mate with the seat well enough to shut off fuel to the bowl.
 

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MDKramer wrote:
Tired Rider wrote:
Thanks drking.
Is there a good place online to find these kits? All I can find are seal kits or jet kits, but nothing I'v seen includes the pilot screw. Another problem is getting the old screw out of the carbs as they all seem to be stuck. Is this something I can do without taking apart and cleaning? Or is this pretty important to overall performance? I would hate to break them all and have to find a machinist to remove them. Thanks...
It's actually quite important to overall performance. So much so that I'll offer the following advice.

Give Andrew over at Classic Cycle Parts a shout. For around $400, you send them your carb deck, they strip it down to the bodies, electrostatic clean them, throw away everything that was removed and replace it with Honda spec parts, bench balance them, and send them back to you.

All that's left to do is mount, sync, and ride.

Trust me, it'll be money better spent, and alot less time scratching your head, or banging it on the workbench.
I thought about that, but wasn't sure if I should part with that much cash at the moment. With retirement within the next two months, I'm a little strapped.
 

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Your bike looks pretty decent. If the carbs are the major problem, consider having someone such as Classic rebuild them.

He did a set for me.
 

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Another problem I have is the air shutoff valves are toast. They were basically just melted to almost nothing. I have cleaned up the accelerator pump (looks pretty good), float valve and seat (working well now), vacuum chamber cover, main jet needle, vacuum piston and spring, all look good. Removed and cleaned the main jet and needle jet holder and jet. They really are pretty clean inside and all the seals look good and I’m sure that 1 and 3 will actually get fuel and fire now once I replace the air cutoff valves and get them put back together. The pilot screws bother me though. I really appreciate everyone’s help.
 

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From the sounds of it the bike sat a long time with gas in the bowls which gummed up.
I would completely disassemble each carb and soak them for at least a day to loosen everything up. Be sure to keep each carbs parts separated.
Some of the home improvement stores sell WD-40 by the gallon for alot less dough than PB blaster or WD-40 by the spray can.
Pick up 4 plastic containers large enough to fit the entire carb into it.

Randakks sells seal kits. The seals are very good quality.
Included in the kit is 4 intake O rings, a petcock seal kit, 4 cutoffs and accel pump.
Ask in the For Sale forums, someone may have a pilot jet screw laying around they can send you. Andrew might also.

The carbs taken one at a time are pretty simple to rebuild.

The easiest way to go is the complete rack for the 400 bucks but doing it yourself you could save a buck or 2.
 

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drking wrote:
i want to chop a couple of inches of my rear shock's and reweld , know anyone who ever did that?
No I dont, sory. Ask around and I'm sure someone has at least looked into it. Thanks again...
 

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Tired, I realize that $400 sounds like a pretty hefty chunk of change, but if you price out 4 kits, 4 float sets, cutoff valves, slides, and accelerator pump, your nearing or even passing $400 already, plus you still have tear them down, clean them making sure to get all the little passageways clear, reassemble them perfectly, get the floats set (I have tried numerous times, and I always thought I was pretty good with carbs, and never gotten the technique down)...

Something else I'll mention. If that bike of yours has been sitting in a garage somewhere, you might want to take a flashlight and a small inspection mirror and have a look-see inside the tank. If you find a good layer of rust, you'll want to take care of that before spending any time on the carbs as you'll get rust particles through the filter that will jam up all the small passegways in the carbs.

Cheapest and EASIEST way I've found to get rid of it is with a product called RUSTECO Pour it in, let it sit, shop-vac it out, rinse, and you're done.

It all may seem like a royal pain to start with, but in the end, you'll have a bike that will give you a couple hundred thousand miles worth of enjoyment.
 

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MDKramer wrote:
Tired, I realize that $400 sounds like a pretty hefty chunk of change, but if you price out 4 kits, 4 float sets, cutoff valves, slides, and accelerator pump, your nearing or even passing $400 already, plus you still have tear them down, clean them making sure to get all the little passageways clear, reassemble them perfectly, get the floats set (I have tried numerous times, and I always thought I was pretty good with carbs, and never gotten the technique down)...

Something else I'll mention. If that bike of yours has been sitting in a garage somewhere, you might want to take a flashlight and a small inspection mirror and have a look-see inside the tank. If you find a good layer of rust, you'll want to take care of that before spending any time on the carbs as you'll get rust particles through the filter that will jam up all the small passegways in the carbs.

Cheapest and EASIEST way I've found to get rid of it is with a product called RUSTECO Pour it in, let it sit, shop-vac it out, rinse, and you're done.

It all may seem like a royal pain to start with, but in the end, you'll have a bike that will give you a couple hundred thousand miles worth of enjoyment.
Thanks Mike,

Yeah, carb kits are not cheap. I did find a kit that will do all 4 carbs(Look at the link and tell me what you think.) and seems to have everything I would need. And you're right, carbs are a pain in the ar$$. I enjoy fiddiling with things and thoughtI would give it a try. Funds are tight and I have until spring to get everything done. Also, the tank was rusted bad and I wish I would have heard of the Rusteco prior to using the Kreem. It sounds like a better product with the results I would have prefered. New fuel lines, filter, oil and filter, and new timing belts are in. Thanks, and it's off to work for me now. Talk to you soon...
 

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Here's the only carb rebuild kit recommended by most of us and most of the carb re-builders use it too.

http://www.randakks.com/Carb Parts.htm#9A


No carb kit includes the slow jets. You'll need to find a junk set of carbs to get one off of.
 
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