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I suspect the 7volt reg has failed but

A) I need to use the bike tomorrow and can live without the fuel gauge but will running without temp gauge stop anything else from working (such as the fan)

B) where the hell is the regulator, the book says at the back of the instruments but I have had a look and can't find it

Its not in the fairing on the interstate is it?

I am wondering if I can just make a solid state one to replace the old one , anyone done this?

thanks for any ideas
 

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miroku800 wrote:
I suspect the 7volt reg has failed but

A) I need to use the bike tomorrow and can live without the fuel gauge but will running without temp gauge stop anything else from working (such as the fan)
No, it won't hurt anything.
B) where the hell is the regulator, the book says at the back of the instruments but I have had a look and can't find it
It's a little unit behind the gauges. Look at the Motogrid or Honda Direct Line parts fische and you should able to see it.
Its not in the fairing on the interstate is it?
No, see above.
I am wondering if I can just make a solid state one to replace the old one , anyone done this?
Yes, it's been done by some members and the information to do it should be in the archives.
thanks for any ideas
 

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miroku800 wrote:
...I am wondering if I can just make a solid state one to replace the old one , anyone done this?
search for LM317 or 7807 ....

Several have made their own (including me).. I have some 7807 regulators available and the LM317 s are readily available at any electronic parts


Edit: I mispoke... corrected 7805 to 7807 above..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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sandiegobrass wrote:


Several have made their own (including me).. I have some 7805 regulators available and the LM317 s are readily available at any electronic parts
have you by any chance a circuit using the 7805 regulator

Many thanks

Rob
 

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I should have said 7807.. Filter capacitors are actually optional for this application as the gages don't care about a little noise..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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sandiegobrass wrote:
miroku800 wrote:
sandiegobrass wrote:


Several have made their own (including me).. I have some 7805 regulators available and the LM317 s are readily available at any electronic parts
have you by any chance a circuit using the 7805 regulator

Many thanks

Rob
Filter capacitors are actually optional for this application as the gages don't care about a little noise..

thanks for that but surely that will only produce 5v and the gauges need seven, does the low voltage not affect accuracy and give a false reading?
 

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My bad all the way around... should have said 7807 chips.. I'll fix stuff above.. You'll have to edit yours to get rid of my mistake.. sorry about that..
 

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Ah ha that makes more sense to me now
I couldn't quite work out how you got 7 volts from a 5v regulator

Many thanks for the info
 

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miroku800 wrote:
Ah ha that makes more sense to me now
I couldn't quite work out how you got 7 volts from a 5v regulator

Many thanks for the info
Actually you can...

Many have stopped by their local Radio Shack store and noticed the famous LM317T adjustable voltage regulator. But, did not realize that all voltage regulators are adjustable? Any IC voltage regulator can be adjusted to a higher voltage than its fixed voltage by just adding a couple of resistors.

As an example, the 7805 (5 volt) voltage regulator will be made as a 7 volt regulator. In figure 1, assume 470 for R1 which means that a constant current of 10.6 mA will be seen between terminals 2 and 3. This constant current plus a regulator standby current of about 2.5mA will flow through R2 to ground regardless of its value. Because of this constant 13.1 mA, R2 can now be set to a value which will give us a constant2 volts across this resistor. A resistor value of 152 ohms or 150 (standard value) will give us the necessary 7 volts (actual about 6.97), With 5 volts across R1 and 2 volts across R2, a total regulated value of about 7 volts will appear across terminal 2 and ground. If a variable resistor is used for R2, then the output voltage can be easily fine tuned to any value greater than 5 volts. The regulator standby current will vary slightly in the 7805 but 2.5mA will yield good results in the calculations. If an exact voltage is needed then R2 must be a variable resistor.

To make any fixed regulator adjustable, use the following formula:

Vout = Vfixed + R2(Vfixed/R1 + Istndby)

Vout = Desired output voltage

Vfixed = Fixed voltage of IC regulator (5 volts for 7805 or 1.25 volts for LM317T)

R1 = Assume any value from about 470 to 1K for best results

Istndby = Standby current of regulator (use 2.5MA for 7805 or zero for LM317T)

Common Resistor Combinations for the 7805 regulator:


Vout

(Approx.) R1 R2

6 Volts 470 100
7 volts 470 150
8 Volts 470 220
9 Volts 470 330
12 Volt 470 510


The famous LM317T adjustable regulator is really nothing more than a fixed regulator with an output voltage of 1.25 volts. Builders seldom need voltages below 5 volts so the 7805 regulator is a good choice and it even costs a little bit less than the LM317T.
 

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