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I have adjusted the rear brake pedal at the master cylinder both ways.All the way in and all the way out.Can't seem to find much if any difference in either extreme.Brake pedal seems to me that it has to travel a bit too far for my liking.I'd like the brakes to bit right quick.New pads on there and a rebuilt caliper too.

What am I missing?
 

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They're very hard to bleed properly. Until you do there won't be much difference in regard to the stop adjustment and you'll experience too much travel. I dunno about other GL's but my 1100 moto is: "use power bleeder..."

edit - just noticed you have Aspencade - aren't they linked to one caliper on the front? Either way, bleeding air is harder on my 1100 std than any other vehicle I've ever worked on. That's spanning 40 years and hundreds of other vehicles!
 

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Back several months one of members, who is an EMT, made a brake bleeder using a rather large syringe and tubing used on an oxygen mask...Worked great....I used that onmy wing, butmy problemwas caliper related problems not air in the line...

Claude....
 

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No argument there AC.The brakes have been bleed about as well as can be done.I'd say I bled a quart of fluid through the rear master cylinder till I got it as good as it is right now but of course I still don't like the "travel" issue.Are you saying the adjustment of the screw at the master cylinder won't do it? It HAS to be a bleed job?I'm not arguing...I'm just asking.
Yes the Aspencade is linked the front right and the rear.
 

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redbaron wrote:
Back several months one of members, who is an EMT, made a brake bleeder using a rather large syringe and tubing used on an oxygen mask...Worked great....I used that onmy wing, butmy problemwas caliper related problems not air in the line...

Claude....
it is a great way to do it if you have access to the syringe
 

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tomw wrote:
No argument there AC.The brakes have been bleed about as well as can be done.I'd say I bled a quart of fluid through the rear master cylinder till I got it as good as it is right now but of course I still don't like the "travel" issue.Are you saying the adjustment of the screw at the master cylinder won't do it? It HAS to be a bleed job?I'm not arguing...I'm just asking.
Yes the Aspencade is linked the front right and the rear.
you should be able to adjust foot height of the pedalor travel of the piston with the adjusting screw on the rear master. if you have a weak master or air it might not show it up, jb
 

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OK JBZ I get it.Thanks.Probably air A-G-A-I-N!
 

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I've seen a bunch of power bleeders made out of garden sprayers. I just ended up getting a real one for a few bucks.

tomw, you got air in the system and no amount of regular bleeding will get rid of it. Bench bleed the master and since the master and the caliber are on nearly level ground, get that rear up in the air and let gravity help you. Spend some time whacking the lines too, it's amazing how much air will cling to the pipes. I didn't think that rear brake pedal adjustment had much to do with braking but more to do with pedal height.
 

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For what it is worth... I found the same thing on my 80 gl1100. I found some bled ports with built in check valves. Worked for me
 

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Just bled the right front and the rear calipers.Pedal is nice and hard now.Just opened the bleeder a crack...and I do mean a crack and then pumped the pedal hard.Came up pretty quick on both the front and rear.
Nice call morram.
Thanks everyone.
 

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The front to rear linking on the Aspencades is for the '83 and higher. The '82 doesn't link.
 

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The " Unified Braking system " is on all 1983 Goldwings .

Tom once you get all the air out ,its got good stopping power . You will be able to lock the rear tire when its working correctly. I fought with mine a long time to get then working right . ITs a shame there so hard to bleed .
 

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I noticed just that fact today.I mean locking the rear wheel.I didn't lock it up but I can feel that its a nice tight brake now.
 

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As you've discovered the adjustment on the rear master is only for setting the up stop on the pedal. You can set the at rest position of the pedal with the adjustment, total pedal travel of a well bled system should be around 1-1 1/2". If it's more than that as you've discovered there is still air in the system. On the linked brake 'Wings, from 1983through the 1500 modelsyou need to start bleeding the master cylinder from the front caliper and do the rear caliper last. Thickness of the pads doesn't make any difference. Worn pads take the same pedal stroke as brand new ones. This is because the pads don't retract when you let go of the brakes, they justrelease pressure on the disk so it always takes the same amount of brake fluid from the master to operate them. The level in the master reservoir will do down over time because of pad wear but the pedal or lever won't feel any different. Very stubborn bleeding problems often are caused by plugged up relief ports in the master cylinder. If that tiny port gets plugged as they are known to do, you'll have a hell of a time bleeding the system. It's also likely the brakes will overheat and seize if that port is plugged.
 
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