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Well, I am in the middle of my rear shock rebuild on my GL1100. I started with a Forum search and found Gambler's post on GL1200 shock rebuild and it has been a great help though the GL1100 is just a bit different.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/14189-1.html

Here is another post of the GL1100 rear shock spring replacement. Has great photos and details of the shock disassemble process with another version of Gambler's tool.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/86014.html


I also found a great deal of information that I wanted to condense into this post.


First, to disassemble the shocks, take a look at Gamblers post. He has come up with a very nice shock compression tool which is crucial. I made one as well with scrap in the garage.

Here is a picture ofone of my shocks disassembled. I'll go through some of the failures, how to clean and prepare parts and assembly.
 

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The parts I purchased for my rebuild include a new set of progressive springs, a new pair of shock seals, four o-rings and new bottoming bump stops.

Progressive Springs for the GL1100(you can find them cheaper elsewhere if you look)
http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Suspension-Spring-Kit-00-1170/dp/B000WK3Q1I/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1348858117&sr=1-1&keywords=00-1170


Bumper Stops $2.99 a pair
http://www.energysuspensionparts.com/proddetail.asp?prod=9.8104

Rear seals Honda part number 91257-463-013 about $11.00 each.
 

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The stock GL1100 and GL1200 shocks are Showa air-over shocks. The "shock" part of the rear assemble is "not" serviceable. It is a welded closed unit containing the piston, sleeve, compression and extension dampening valves. The GL1100 shock contains a rubber bumper stop on the shaft that cushions full compression. This is what causes a great deal of shock failures but can be remedied.


During my rebuild I found the rubber bump stop deteriorated. It appears not to be compatible with long exposure to oil. I also determined one of my shocks was not dampening on the compression stroke.

So... I wanted to investigate what actually failed and was surprised it wasn't wear of the internal components, it was the deterioration of the rubber bumper...

This is a picture of my shock, ground the cap off, and disassembled the components.
 

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What I found was the foot valve and piston valve were filled with goo from the bumper deterioration.

Here is a close up of the foot valve as I found it.
 

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This is what is left of the rubber pump stop.



The replacement bump stop I found is a universal polyurethane 3/8" ID, 1 1/4" OD. The ID is a bit small so you will have to drill out the center with a 7/16" bit to let it fit snuggly over the shaft. Make sure you clean the bushing very well after drilling.



I cut off the small nipple on the stop. I don't think you have to though.
 

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Now there are plenty of shock options on the market for the GL1100, air and standard.

One place you can look is for "take offs" from some Harley Davidsons. They are the same air shock but come generally in black and may be just a little bit longer.

Do a search on ebay for Harley Davidson Air Shock and you will find a lot of options. Try to get the newest and ones where they have been sealed since removable. It is impossible to know if fluid has leaked nor the current oil level.

Here are some Harley part numbers to guide your search.

54532-85
54536-02A
54540-93
54565-09 FLH FLHT FLHR FLHTI 13" (G5E3-00)
54565-97 (A) FLH 13"
54565-97 (B)
54565-97 (C)
54631-02B Road king FLHRS or FLHX or FLTRX 12" shock pair "low profile"
54632-98 bagger 12" or 12.5
54635-09 12"
54661-02A Road King FLHR Street Glide 12" single shock "lowered"
54662-09 street glide 11.5"
 

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As mentioned above, Gambler's post on GL1200 shock rebuild shows a nice home made shock compression tool.

Here is my shock compression tool. I used some all thread, and pieces of metal scrap I had around the garage. The board is cut from Adventech 3/4" flooring (not particle board) since I don't have a metal hole saw.
 

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So how do you fix a gummed up shock especially since you can't take the shock apart?

I had bought a couple shocks from one of our forum members and disassembled them to get a good shock. I found that these shocks also had the same problem with a deteriorated bump stop. I took both shocks and submerged them in lacquer thinner over night, activating them while submerged to make sure the internal sleevewas full.

Lacquer thinner will quickly dissolve the remnants of the bumperfrom the internal components. After soaking, remove and activate the shock several times to drain out all the thinner. I let my sit for a while in the sun to "bake" out the rest of the thinner.

There are no internal components of the GL1100 shock that will be adversely effected by the lacquer thinner.

Important: Before submersing the shock in lacquer thinner, remove the eye bushings.

Be gentle when activating the shock with lacquer thinner since it is not a lubricant.

As for the bumper, again I replaced it with http://www.energysuspensionparts.com/proddetail.asp?prod=9.8104 and will not be effected by Automatic Transmission Fluid.

You can not assemble the shock without the bump stop. This keeps the piston from hitting the foot valve inside the shock. If it does bottom out, it could crack the valve and ruin the valve seat.
 

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So with the shock in the compression tool you can begin to assemble.

I use the bump stop to hold the shaft at full extension...
 

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If you don't want to deal with using the original shock or believe they are not functioning properly, you can buy a new replacement.

You can replace the shock with the new replacement but only add 2.5 oz of fluid since the new shock is sealed

http://www.motorcyclepartsareus.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MPAU&Product_Code=771170

Scroll down to find the replacement shocks. But at $195, I would strongly suggest you consider a pair of Progressive's Series 12 standard shocks and abandon the air shocks all together. You will spend about the same and have several spring options. I have a pair on my naked gold wing and love them! I had them on my Aspy while I was doing my rebuild and strongly considered buying another pair but the chrome Series 12 are pricey, so I went ahead with this rebuild.
 

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First the spring seat, the locking nut on the end of the shaft, and then the springs and friction tube (white plastic cup).

I found that the progressive springs are just a bit larger, especially the inner spring so the friction tube was a tight fit.

Note: I really can't stress enough the importance of keeping everything very clean. I'm using compressed air to make sure there is NO dirt or particulate of any kind on these parts.
 

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Now for the air chamber sleeve and compress the springs. Things will wobble around a little bit but try to compress the springs evenly.
 

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Once you have the springs compressed enough, you can install the shock eye on the end of the shaft. I use just a bit of lock tight on the threads and automatic transmission fluid to lube the o-rings.

Once you tighten the lock nut, rotate the eye so the flat tabs on the inside of the air chamber tube line up with the slots on the shock eye, you can push it down until it sits flush.

Then loosen the compression tool evenly...
 

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You need to install a plug, cork, rubber stopper or the correct thread bolt into the air inlet of the shock to keep fluid from draining. Turn you shock over and place in the vise.

Again, it is very important to keep things clean, and do not use any metal tool near the chrome surface of the shock. One scratch will cause air and fluid leakage.

You will be adding 10.5 OZ of ATF in the shock before installing the seal. This is a great deal easier than trying to add it through the air inlet. I found a nice measuring cup at the dollar store, don't use your wife's, she will find out!

 

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Here is a picture of the assembly order of the seal and assorted parts. The one part that is not in this picture is the wire ring that is inside the air chamber tube. It keeps the metal guide in place.
 

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Next make sure the wire "c" ring is installed inside the air chamber tube. Lube the shock with a bit of ATF and slide on the metal guide with the flat side out. Make sure it is in far enough to sit on the wire "c" ring. Then install the thin washer, next the seal with the flat side out, pushing it down with your fingers. Next is the thick washer.
 

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Then using a piece of 1 1/2" PVC cut flush to tap in the seal. Be gentle. Install the snap ring. You really do need a pair of snap ring pliers for this. Don't risk scratching the chrome surface.
 

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Install you bellows and your done!


Hope this helps the GL1100 crowd.


Total cost, about $110. A lot cheaper than a new pair of replacement air shocks...

William
 

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very , very nicely done. enjoyed the pics too. now if we can get it over to the tech postsection.
 
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