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So at 60ish psi in a GL1100, me a girl and gear on her we bottom out at times. I"m guessing starting over with new fork oil would do the trick? Any other thing i should be looking at? Any good notes on changing fork oil? Cheers! Dean
 

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60ish psi ?



Which model GL1100 do you have ? (year)



Dave.
 

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sorry Dave. I have the 81 interstate. And 60psi in the rear shocks. Is it normal when you lower air out of that shock that it also sprays out oil? Thanks for your consistent help!
 

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Hey, that's why we're here ;)



Yes it is normal that some oil will spray out, but it's usually just a mist. Bottoming out could force more oil into the lines and then you'd get a stream.



If you have 60ish psi after bottoming out then there's a real issue there, or (and i obviously don't know you personaly, so bear with me) your combined weight might be at the upper level of what the shocks can take.



If you have to re-pressurise the shocks after bottoming out then there's an airleak, either in the lines themselves or the o-rings have gone west.



Another option is to replace the standard ATF with a 30 weight fork oil and keep the pressure at about 44psi.



60 psi is just a tad over the maximum for these shocks (max = 57psi)



Dave.
 

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WingerDave wrote:
If you have 60ish psi after bottoming out then there's a real issue there, or (and i obviously don't know you personaly, so bear with me) your combined weight might be at the upper level of what the shocks can take.
So Im 240, she is 150 ish, and I bet we have a little less than 75 lbs of gear (?) so no more than 500 total? I dont feel like that would be too much for a goldwing to handle?
 

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I certainly wouldn't call that excesive, no (just worked that out in kilos = 212 kg).



I'd check for air leaks or too little oil (my moneys on the oil). The latter incures an overhaul.



What you could do, is look for a set of 1983 STD or Interstate shocks. They have stiffer springs inside and can be run at 0 psi (at a pinch, for short distances).



Dave.
 

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Had the same problem with my 1200, but worse. It was bottoming out with just me onboard. Shocks were shot. The right one especially. It was leaking ATF. Pulled them off and looked inside. Seals were shot, and I figured the springs were as well. So, I bit the bullet and got some Progressives. You can also rebuild the existing OEM shocks with Progressive Springs. Since I upgraded to the Progressives on the rear, ride is great and no more bottoming out.

Good Luck with whatever you do and Welcome to the Forum!



 

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WingerDave wrote
I'd check for air leaks or too little oil (my moneys on the oil). The latter incures an overhaul.
So if that is the case is it as simple as draining the oil out of the forks and adding new oil and then recharging? (Given there is no leaks). I noticed there is a drain plug at least on the front shocks, and I presume its just a hair more complicated than chaning the engine oil. Drain and refill. Sorry if these questions are stupid, I really appreciate your support. Hopefully I can get back on the road today. I do have a manual... but its easier for me to try to conceptualize it first (by asking stupid questions)

Dean
 

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Welcome to the forum. As for changing shock oil please go to the linke that WingerDave provided and download that manual. It is the factory service manual and explains in detail how to check and rebuild the shocks. As for the front "shocks" which are referred to as "forks" the process is similar but not as simple as draining out the old and putting in the new.
 

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Bob Cassel
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My 82 1100 I was bottoming out too, after a rebuild so I put progressive springs in. WOW, WHAT A DIFFERENCE. Cost was only about $50 and it took me a day (had to build a shock compression tool). Fist shock took about six hours, second about 45 minutes.

Invest the $50, you will not regret it. You'd have to take the shocks off anyway to refill them, take the extra time and do the job right.

If you'd like the tool I built, PM and I'll ship it to you for price of shipping, but you can build your own for about the same price.
 

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Heres a strange thought... what about removing the valve stem in the air line for the shocks... then pumping fork oil into that, and following it up with air... the air should clear out the oil and press it to where it should be right? I know its a long shot, but i'm broke and trying for something! Thanks!!!
 

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Bob Cassel
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Kinda hard to get the oil to flow up hill, and equally into both shocks.
 

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if the seals aren't leaking it might be possible to take the shock apart(seals) drain and replace the shock fluid,but at approx $12 per seal,is it worth the time and effort,w/o opening the shock up its almost impossible to get the shock empty
 

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opps double post
 

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I have an 82 Asp 1100 and have to run my front forks at 40# and the rear shocks at 65# to get a decent ride. With no air pressure they all bottom, are they supposed to be like that with a 220# rider? I have no leaks but have never checked the oil levels.
 

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40 # in the front ??? I think 20# is the max in the frontfor an 82 and 50# in the rear
 

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My 82 bottoms out also. I just got it and the PO said he pumped the rear up to 90 to get a good ride. I guess I'll try to go through them this winter.
 

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The only real way to truly stop your suspension form bottoming out is to rebuild your shocks and forks with new springs and seals. Changing the oil only yields a minor and very temporary improvement.

And you guys are putting way to much air into your suspension. Max for the front is less than 20 psi and 43psi for the rear.

If you are needing these ridiculously high psi settings to keep from bottoming out your springs are shot a need to be replaced.

You need to know and understand what each element of your shocks does. The weight of the bike, you, your passenger and any load is carried by the springs. The air pressure simple determines preload ride height, and the oil provides dampening so the wheel doesn't bounce over bumps.

Oil changes and high psi settings will NOT do you any good when ti comes to bottoming out. The ONLY thing that will cure that problem is new springs.
 
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