Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
imported post

A person has offered me a 1978 GL1000 :1000darkblue:for a very cheap price. ($300.00) It looks like hell and will take a lot of work to get in shape to run. There is no major frame damage, it's just in parts. (he tried to fix it and gave up)

I've read web pages on this model and I must admit they make me think the bike is a problem child.:?

What my question is: should I waste my time with it and make it run again.(I do rebuild old bikes) or do a "flea bay" with the parts? Then again I could just pass on the offer.

What do you guys think?:baffled:
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
imported post

As long as you've got lots of money for parts and have the know how to do it and you want a hobby, go ahead. You'll probably end up spending 1500-3000 US dollars on parts and supplies to make it into a nice bike. If you're not so handy you may be better off waiting for a good deal on a Wing that's been taken care of a little better.

Hope this helps a bit.

Vic
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
183 Posts
imported post

any bike from 78 has the potential to be a problem child.



The price is right if you don't mind doing the fixing up yourself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
imported post

I don't want to offend any GL1000 owners, but I personally think that a GL1000 in decent condition is still a beast to handle and most of them run like a pig to boot. Buying a $300 dog is likely to result in you throwing money into a bottomless hole, with no guarantee of 100% success. Bottom line is I wouldn't touch this with a bargepole (except to push it away). A basket case GL1100 would be a better bet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
imported post

Jason wrote:
I don't want to offend any GL1000 owners, but I personally think that a GL1000 in decent condition is still a beast to handle and most of them run like a pig to boot. Buying a $300 dog is likely to result in you throwing money into a bottomless hole, with no guarantee of 100% success. Bottom line is I wouldn't touch this with a bargepole (except to push it away). A basket case GL1100 would be a better bet.
You are reading my mind. I was hoping somebody could show me a good side to this offer. If I put $1000.00 in parts I may be able to make it street legal. Then the next question could I even sell it for $1300.00 to break even. The only gain would be the lesson of "staying away from these bikes"...... :shock:

Maybe there is a "good side" I just don't see it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
427 Posts
imported post

Duck and run. You'll never get your money out of it. Take it from one who's been there.
 

·
The Irish Crew
Joined
·
3,932 Posts
imported post

keener wrote:
Duck and run. You'll never get your money out of it. Take it from one who's been there.
That puts it well. Anyone remember all the grief tha Gilles had with his 1000? No matter how much time and cash he put into the carbs in particular, the bike still never ran as well as he expected it to. :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
114 Posts
imported post

Not a good idea to take on a poor condition gl1000. better I think to spend more money on a good condition example as cheaper in the long run it will be. Less money will be needed to keep a good example in good order.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,938 Posts
imported post

Hey Jason tell us how you really feel?!!!!

You made my day, I needed a good laugh!!:goofygrin:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
imported post

Save your money for a more worthwhile project Corneo. Even if you got the crate for nothing it will probably cost more than you would ever get back when selling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
imported post

I just rebuilt a '77 GL1000. Not too much grief - did a lot of reading - lots of research, and got a good factory manual. A friend lent me all his specialized GL1000 tools.

It took a few months (most of the timewaiting for parts from ebay sellers). Aside from changing the timing belts I didn't have to to any internal engine work, but I did have to completely rebuild the carbs, the wire harness, acquire and install lots of missing parts, take care of rust in the tank, clean, etc.

It was a bit of a challenge, but nothing that I couldn't do myself. I do, however have 21 years of experience as an aircraft mechanic - I'm sure that helped.

Do you want a project or do you want to ride?

If you want a project, and you're mechanically inclined and have the space and tools to do the job - by all means do it.

If you want to ride, if you have the space - buy the bike and part it out on ebay. You could possibly make enough to almost pay for a running bike.

Marco,

Ashland, OR
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
626 Posts
imported post

Its a shame to see so many old Wings being abandoned and rusted up. The GL1000 is the granddaddy after all, I guess its like in real life where many granddads end up abandoned in the old folks home. :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42 Posts
imported post

Keener is right and mine was actually a pretty nice example that had been taken good care of. Bottom line is if you like to ride more than fiddle, then this is not the right bike. I ended up selling mine and got 2500 cdn for it so I took it and ran but I did loose on it even though I did all or most of the work. These bikes look nice but can be agravating. It is the carburators that will likely cause the most grief.

Gilles
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
35 Posts
imported post

Hello All; I have been sandbaggin it here but you all have pulled me in. I bought a 75 Gl1000 this April that was barn fresh and rested after 13 years. It was a mess but with a lot of tech tips from these sites and all these experienced guys, we were able to put 6000 miles on it this year. I ride with a friend that has a HD Ultra Classic and he can't get away from me. I did do a lot of wrenchin but didn't have to get a second job to buy a trouble free unit. Mine is the 85th made and its all part of the charm. A wing for $300? Ill make room fer it.....

Thanks

Bill Veith

Erie Pa
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,875 Posts
imported post

If you are intrigued by the bike itself for its year and model. If you have room to lay it all out and it won't be disturbed, If you are prepared to be nickeled and dimed, and if you are in no rush or have any timeline. If you really enjoy working on time consuming projects. If you want to keep a classic out of the boneyard.

[align=center] THEN MAKE IT MINT AND MAKE US PROUD:clapper:[/align]
[align=center]:1000red:[/align]
[align=center]If you do this project, maybe we can talk Steve into making you aSUPER GURU [/align]
[align=center][/align]
[align=left]Kyle[/align]
You only get out of it as much as you put into it!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
imported post

If I may put in my 2 cents worth...

If you're considering the purchase from the standpoint of reviving it and then selling it for a profit, I'd agree with those who have advised you to pass on it. You'd never see profit even from the parts, let alone the time and effort.

If you are an enthusiast for this model, then we wouldn't even be discussing this, would we?:D You'd have snatched it up already, storage spaceor not. A good friend posted this quotationon another site I frequent, and it seems appropriate here:

You are embarking on a rolling restoration . Each season you will improve your bike. You will amass a store of parts, probably an engine also. Around you, more and more parts will be produced as pattern parts. In around 5 years (10, 20?) your bike will be perfect (not overperfect, just perfect). In 50 years it will also be perfect. Your 8,000 mile bike will now be a 200,000 mile bike. You see, once a classic gets into the hands of an enthusiast, it doesnt matter if its done 8,000 miles or 200,000 - the point is that part of the pleasure for us is maintaining and rejuvenating our machines. Expect to restore your bike maybe 4 or five times in your life, very basically when your young and pure, more detailed and originally when your older. Bikes arent human, they dont wear down and die! Get out there and enjoy!"

This was written by Harry Teicher, a Danish Honda CB500/4 owner.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Restoring bikes isn't all that much different (financially speaking) from restoring airplanes. I just sold a Commonwealth Skyranger that I rebuilt from a basket case for $20,000. I had $30,500 in the thing. Paid $5,000 for the wrecked airplane. So the money isn't in it, cost me about -$4.00/hr to work on the thing. That's the negative.

The positive was I got a hell of a lot of satisfaction bringing the old girl back to her original glory. I got a good 100hrs fun flying it, and learned a few new things to boot. My '86SEI is kinda the same deal. It probably won't sell for as much as I have in it, but I had a good time getting it back into shape (mostly cosmetic) and really enjoy riding the green machine. (still think it's a better color than red)

I think it's always a lot easier to buy a nice machine, but it only says you have the money. To rebuild one is to gain a bit of pride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

I didn't buy my old bike and fix it up to sell it. I bought it to fix it up, make it look nice, and ride the wheels off it! So what that I have almost $3000 in it, it's much cheaper than a new one, and easier to fix.

Raymond
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I always have mixed feelings about old machines being parted out. It's sad to see one going the way of all things but on the other handif they weren't we probably couldn't keep ours going due to lack of parts.

I plan to ride the Green Machine until one of us can't anymore. With any luck it will be me that craps out first since the bike has 42 years on me. :santawaving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

Especially when it's a really nice complete running bike that gets parted out and ebay'ed. But like you say, that one bike may keep a few others on the road. Maybe, maybe not. Still sad though.

And parts are a lot easier to find for the bike than the rider! No wonder they last longer..
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top