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Well, here's my first question for the group- what's the best procedure for revamping my '82 goldwing aspencade?

This was my dads bike, last ridden in '87. Low miles, no damage except torn seats and lots of musty smell. Stored for 22 years- I still can't believe it. Chances are he would have prepared it for storage, since he did operate a Honda dealership for many years. After this long though, I'm sure it needs TLC plus.

So- where to start? I'm going to pull the plugs and spray some light oil around the cylinders, hoping to wet the entire circumference of the pistons, then let that sit for a few days. Maybe I should change the oil before I take the next step- ? Turn it over without the plugs in (plugs will be grounded to the engine with the wires attached). This will be done using jumper cables from a fully charged 12v battery, since the battery on the bike is going to be- well, it probably looks like an alien by now. Once I find it, I'll take it out.

I'm wondering about pre-pressurizing the oil system. I thought to remove the oil pressure sender, then pump some fresh oil in through there to hopefully get some lube to points where it has totally drained down. Anyone think this makes sense? I've been told to just turn it over without the plugs in, and watch for the oil pressure light to go out, but I don't want to damage dry bearings, etc. Am I worrying too much about this?

I guess one thing I wonder about is - can I just put in a liter of fresh oil (not overfilling it of course) and run it through a warm up and then change all the oil and the filter, or should I drain it cold first, then replace filter and oil, then start it for the first time in years? Same question goes for the antifreeze- if the level of what's in there is ok, can I run it like that til fully warmed up, or should it be changed before the engine is fired up?

Next question- the fuel system. My thought was to drain whatever might be in the tank, then partly fill with a fuel/carb cleaner mixture, run it through the carbs til they pee, then let that sit for several days. Add more fuel to the tank to make it mostly fuel, then try to fire it up. The alternative is to fully clean out the tank, remove and rebuild the carbs pretty much totally, clean and/or replace any fuel lines, --how far should I go- are there going to be problems with diaphrams in the carbs? As far as jets, am I better off to replace right away? What are the chances that I won't have to rebuild the carbs? If I do have to, is there still a source of parts for this bike?

Lots of questions, I know. I'd rather do the job right, and I'd also rather keep the expense down as much as possible. I'm no stranger to taking things apart and getting them back together again properly, so I'd be doing almost all of the work myself. I'm not going to attempt to change the tires myself, though. I'll leave that to a shop that can do it right.

All well-meaning replies accepted, appropriate advise is appreciated. Thanks
 

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1st: I would change the timing belts. This is an interference engine. One of them breaks and the engine is in deep kimshee. Pour a full can of Sea Foam into the crankcase oil. Right now, so it can start dissolving the crud down there.

2nd: Leave the plugs out, spray in a lot of MMO or tranny fluid, with the front cover off the engine while you are changing the timing belts, turn it over by hand a few times to work that oil onto the cylinder walls. Turn it in the correct direction and the oil pump will do its' magic. The bearings will be okay.

3rd: the carbs probably need to be cleaned, and maybe the gas tank is rusty? I would not try to use the gas tank until after you have verified that it is clean. Use an external jug to hold the clean gas and after you have turned the engine over several times, then you can use the starter to whirl it over.

In that gas jug? Put in a lot of Sea Foam, full strength for the first few whirls without the plugs installed. Pull that Sea Foam into the carbs and let it do its' magic. Let it set overnight a day or two. It will dissolve a lot of crud and maybe, just maybe get things clean enough that it will start and run later.

Lots more to think about, but this is just a "first things" I would do.
 

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I think that Azgl1500 pretty much nailed it. I do have one comment though. Wouldn't using the kill switch be easier than keeping sparkplugs hooked to the wires and grounded? I don't know just a thought.

Your dad being the man he was, I'll bet he ran the carbs dry before storing it. Depending on where he stored the bike, I would check air cleaner for rodent nests.

Keep us informed of your progress. You'll have a great bike when all is said and done. Remember though John's 1st listed item those timing belts. Unless you're "feeling lucky", (a broken belt=ruined engine).

Terry
 

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Even if the carbs work so-so after Seafoam (I like it a lot), aren't you going to end up doing the carbs anyway? why not just yankem out and clean them right the first time? new air cutoff and accelerator pump diaphrams too.

Also, please don't ride it until you verify the condition of the brakes! Not being able to stop is a "bad thing". I bet you'll have to rebuild or at least clean out the calipers and master cyls.

I'm sure the excitement of the bike would cloud my judgment and I would try to rush, only to make one bad choice after another in order to ride as soon as I could. Please don't be as dumb as me!
 

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Ahh, kimchee, Korea's national food, wonderful stuff. I acquired a taste for it from my Korean sister-in-law. You defintely don't want your MC in it deep.
I have an 84A that was left in a barn for many years and I will do as suggested on this thread before attempting to start it. Can't be too careful. I wish you luck.
Jim(inSC)
 

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Did you get your sleeping beauty running yet Darryl? I would love to read a happy ending and see some pictures.
 

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Curious if he got it running.

I had a intake valve contact the head and bend on a yard find.

Before turning it over AT ALL, I'd add to what's already been said and something I'll do from now on when waking up one of these interference engines is separate the carbs from the heads and squirt PB Blaster on the stem of the intake valves and let it soak a couple days soaking them some more periodically. Doing this will also soak the rings, cylinder walls, and exhaust seats.
Then before turning it over by hand, loosen all of the valve adjusters as far as they'll go and take a look see if the valves are closing.
Doing all this may seem overkill and unneccesary to some but it may just prevent having to pull a head to replace a bent valve.
 

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1st: Welcome to the forum.

2nd: I am appalled that some one here hasn't mentioned this before now.... pictures please. There's nothing like gazing full face into a sleeping beauty. Even if it is just a picture...
 

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Don't start it with 20 year old oil in it. drain it and refill. you will probably do several oil changes before your first ride. And for sure what brianinmaine said. I would flush the brake fluid. If you see little black chunks in the old fluid it's time for new brake lines, they rot from the inside.

Steve
 
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