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Over the last few months, they've been working on repaving a large part of the highway I travel to/from work. Well, they've pretty much got it all finished and it is newly paved.



I noticed, however, that at the slower speeds (15mph and under in stop/go traffic) I've got a light bounce in my front end...Almost like the road is uneven. I didn't pay all that much attention to it during the construction, butthought itwould have goneaway once the final paving was done.



Does anyone know if they purposely make highway roads uneven for any particular reason or have I discovered a suspension issue with my 83 GL1100 Interstate?



I already know that I need to have my front fork seals replaced, as I'm not able to keep any air in the front suspension...But with my limited mechanical knowledge, I just want to be sure I'm not gonna lose my front wheel one of these days...........
 

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RckRagman wrote:
I'm not able to keep any air in the front suspension...


...sounds like the answer is right there.

Edit: Not enough rebound dampening will keep you bouncing-around.
 

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if the air goes somewhere, so the oil. if the forks dont have the same amount of fluid will produce bounce
 

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Low speed bounce isn't uncommon but generally not so pronounced. I think with the other mechanical issues that you have, it's compounded.

I run Dyna Beads and they too seem to compound the issue at slower speed till they can stick to were they need to be and work.

As far as the new road goes?....... They just redid the roads here in King that was a 4 lane very narrow road before the construction. So they widened the road about 20 feet and everyone was excited, they have been working on this for the past 3 years...... then at the very end of construction, they come in at night and pour a 24 foot wide concrete island right down the center of the road........ And the paving?....... A group of preschoolers could have gotten together and done a better job. So ya never know.....
 

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Thank you, all, for your input/confirmation...



But, again, I already know I'm going tohave the seals replaced professionally over the winter or when I wake her from the winter slumber...I just need to know I'm not gonna lose it and end up eating some of the newasphaltduring these last few weeks of pushing my luck to keep riding before any major snow/ice hits my area.

:?

Also want to be sure that I'm not causing more damage by riding with bad seals, which in turn could cost more when I have them replaced by then having to replace more than the seals/fluids.........



I've already learned a lot from this site and I only joined the past March. :thumbsup:
 

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The damage will come in the form of leaky seals which will get on your brake pads and rotors and if it gets into your speedo on the hub it will burn it out if it's electric.

Handling won't be great! I have a new set of forks coming for mine today, the old ones just won't keep a set of seals in them for some reason. I still take it for local rides but cornering is unpredictable and there is a difference in the handling, almost not safe. I definitely wouldn't take mine on the highway.
 

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I've rode many bikes with worn-out front-ends. Edit: ...you'll get use to the new ride characteristics (if you haven't already by now).

The thing to keep in mind with this are the bushings. Don't want to wear those or you'll be replacing them as well.
 

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Are you losing both air and fork oil, or just air?
 

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@ Gido...



To be honest, I have no idea. I never noticed any 'stains' under the bike, so I always felt lucky that a bike the age of mine didn't have any leaks.



When I first started this season, I'd fill the front with about 15-20psi and it would hold for a couple of days (the rear was at about 45psi and never lost any). Early September, I'd go to fill it and I could almost hear the air coming right back out and could feel the difference in my ride, especially if I happened to go around a bumpy corner. Learned quickly to take them a little slower. . .



I know that I've mentioned it in other posts, but I like to remind people that I'm OK on the basics mechanically, but start talking about having to change bearings or bushings, you've lost me.
 

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Rick, the seals on these are really easy to replace. First time I did it it took about 6 hours start to finish, 2 weeks later (and every 2 weeks after that) it took me about 1.5 hours. Very intimidating but easier than it looks. I would do it myself if I were you, and if you screw it up.... Pay someone then. Just make sure you get Honda brand products for the job.
 

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Jobe, I'd love to try. But I lack the garage (and proper tools)with which to perform those types of tasks. A quick brake bleed in my driveway is about the most I've attempted since the weather started getting under 50. But not having shelter to work in, or the tools, or a lift is pretty much why I can't even attempt something more than replacing brake pads (the biggest job I did myself this year). I've got no problem wiring some extra lights (those came out kinda cool), but I'd rather pay someone that KNOWS WHAT THEY'RE DOING so I can ride confident and safe.
 

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If you can't hold air pressure, you can't hold oil either. Probably no spots or stains as the oil left along time ago. With no oil you have no shock absorber, harmonic dampener which means it will pogo as you are describing.



Once you have new bushings and seals, this will be much better. But you're using too much air pressure. Start with none and move up to maybe 5 to 7psi only if you need less bounce.



If you need a new tire, go for it over the winter. If not you could have it spin balanced or add Dyna Beads while the forks are apart. My experience is that the Dyna Beads roll around faster then you can get up to a speed to notice - in other words, no vibration balance should be noticed.



Since I'm spending your money, might as well do the steering stem bearings when you're there. Who knows how old they are?



With all this, you'll be dodging cars on 495 like a pro come spring.
 

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Not having work space might be the problem for you, but tools are mostly basic. What you don't have you could probably buy cheaper than paying a shop, then you own the tools forever.

If you can pull the brakes and front wheel yourself, you should be able to do the fork seals also.
A couple good tutorials on the site for doing the work.
Make sure the seal are put in right side up, Clymers manual tells you to do them wrong for 1100's.
 

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After the brake cylinders are off..... 4 bolts on the fender, 4 bolts on the bottom holding the axle in, and 6 allen screws (or 2 allen screws and 4 #10 bolts)that just get loosened, not removed. Put a socket (or something) over the top caps and lightly tap the forks down. There is a very thin snap ring that you can remove by hand that sets the stop when you put them back in. It sets on each fork right below the top of the triple tree. It won't go down through the lower portion of the triple tree clamp.

Take the wipers off each fork, they just pry off easily. Inside there is a snap ring that can be removed with a dull screw driver, then remove the old seal, probably by puncturing it with the screwdriver and pry it out. Put the new seal in and seat it with a peice of PVC pipe, and reinstall the snap ring and new wiper.

The pipe didn't fit over mine but an 1 1/2" pvc fitting (coupler) will. Or take a 1 1/2 pipe and cut it length wise (2' piece is long enough) to spread it out to go over the forks, in order to drive the seal in place, Reverse the procedure to put back together.

Not pressuring you to do it, some people just feel better having "The professional" do it...... That was my original though. My professional wanted $200 labor plus parts to do it. For $39 in parts, I figured I would give it a crack..... and believe me, it took about a month before I finally built up the courage to do it......

I have my new to me set of forks that came with a super-brace and triple tree that I could do a short video that would show you the things I am talking about if you want to.
 

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had the same issue with my 1100. put another couple lbs in the front shocks and problem solved.
 
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