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Not that I want to do a stoppie, but I am trying to get the Mush out of my front brakes and was wondering if the front brake was able to actually lock up the front wheel or not. I have been reading posts all day on this forum and bleeding brakes all sorts of ways and even rebuilt the front master cylinder today and I still cannot get the front brake to tighten up.

What I have noticed is that whenever I turn the wheel by hand the lever must go half way closed before the wheel stops. Once the lever gets to the half way point the brake feels pretty good but then it hits the handlebar to soon.

I cracked the banjo bolts, used a vacuum pump, now I got a bungee cord on it, but I tried the bungee before and the results where short lived.

This has been an on going problem for some time and I want to fix it. My wife and I am going over the mountains to staunton va to a reunion from wv this weekend and want to get it right. Taking rt 250 down and rt 33 back.

The bike stops OK with the brakes the way they are when used with the back brake, and would be safe enough, but I feel the front brakes should be better. The 1100 is under braked anyway.

Randy
 

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Hey, Neighbor.

Never had an 1100, but I KNOW a 1200 will lock the front wheel.

I just bled mine the normal way, and managed to get all the air out. You must have a bubble hiding somewhere. Did you try emptying the whole system (dump the caliper out) and blow everything open and dry with compressed air - then start over ?

All I can think of is moisture, trash, or ugly old juice laying in the caliper bores.

Sorry I can't be of more help.
 

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Hey Randy, I don't know the condition of your brake lines, but they may be expanding under pressure. They may be stretching enough to give you that air in the line feeling. I haven't changedmy linescause it's tighter than new stuff, but when in doubt, you could eliminate one thing by doing it.
 

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I will tell you what I did that might have caused a problem. I had the left front caliper off last year and accidentally pulled the brake. the piston moved out pretty far, so I took a c clamp and sucked it back in. The brakes never seemed as good after that. But as far as I can tell both calipers are grabbing the same. Just to much sponge. The last guy that had it about 30-40 thousand ago supposedly rebuilt the front calipers. I hear you on the total clean out. Maybe will try that.

Been thinking about the lines also. Over 200 bucks for a set. Anything cheaper out there?

Thanks for the reply.
 

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seeing as you have a standard this might work. it seems to work good for me . loosen the clamps that hold the handlebars just a tad. pivot the bars as high as you can and move them in up and down in differant positions and pump the master while in in differant positions. you might have a trapped bubble. be careful that the fluid doesnt spill. jb
 

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I know when I rebuilt the brakes on my 1100, the only way that I finally got all the air bled out of my front brakes was to remove the lower mounting bolt on the front calipers and rotate them a little until the bleeder valves were pointing straight up. Due to the angle the calipers are mounted, there is always a tiny bit of air trapped that you just can't get out unless you can get the bleeders at the top of the caliper. Mine are quite firm now and I can (and have) locked the front wheel before.
 

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There's no doubt that it's air in the system. The fact that you have to pull the lever half way in to get the wheel to stop when spinning it proves that. If the problem was bad hoses it wouldn't affect the unloaded spin that you're doing. It takes more pressure than that to expand even the most rotten brake lines.
You say you rebuilt the master cylinder. Did you make sure the small port that goes between the reservoir and the cylinder bore is open? That's the one of two that's closest to the banjo end of the cylinder. If that hole (it's very tiny at the bottom of a larger dead ended looking hole) is plugged it will be impossible to bleed the system.
One desperation measure you can try is to tie the brake handle down firmly and leave it over night. This can clear up some air problems but in this case I really think it's in the small master cylinder port.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Thanks for the help everybody. The small port is clear. Takes a small "e" guitar string. Anyway I took all the advice and it seems to help some, but I doubt It will ever be factory till I upgrade the lines maybe. I have it clamped with a bungee right now, but I did this is the past and it went back to being spongy in a short time. The bungee has never worked for me in the past for very long. But others seem to have success with it.

I also installed a fork brace and hooked up two large speakers in my tank bag in addition to the radio pod for the trip. Stereo really cranks now. The wife always complains she cannot hear the music. Now it wont be a problem.


Randy
 

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A few months ago I had to rebuild the rear caliper due to a lockup so I went ahead and put new seals in all calipers along with new brake pads. I used a might-vac to bleed the brakes and have plenty of stopping power and yes, I can lockup the front brakes if I grab them hard enough. 82 1100i.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Bagmaster wrote:
A few months ago I had to rebuild the rear caliper due to a lockup so I went ahead and put new seals in all calipers along with new brake pads. I used a might-vac to bleed the brakes and have plenty of stopping power and yes, I can lockup the front brakes if I grab them hard enough. 82 1100i.
I believe the 82 went to bigger brakes right?
 

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I've got an 81, and trying to avoid a stupid cager with no brake lights, I locked it up good, and in fact, did a nice appropriate "stoppie" rear wheel just a bit off... well... it also scared the @$#% out of me... but anyway. I've never been able to pull my brake lever all the way in. full stop at half way. JUST AN FYI.:action:
 

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Here's one more suggestion just to add to the mix.

instead of using a bungee cord to hold it while you are bleeding them, because that might NOT give you the pressure you need.

Get yourself another MAN to squeeze that brake handle and pump it three times and hold it on the 4th and then bleed it while its at higher pressure. Do that 3 or 4 times and see if that will firm it up.

Make sure you do both front calipers. Its unsafe to have one work and one not work. The Brakes need to pull evenly.

Thats my .02 worth ... your mileage may vary.
 

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The bungee cord works for a different reason: You could have bubbles of air in the system that are too large to fit through brake system orifices.

By using a bungee cord to hold the brake lever on overnight, holding pressure in the brake system, the air bubbles are compressed, so that they fit through the orifices and gradually make their way up to the master cylinder reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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That makes sense. So I need to bungee cord it every night for a while?
 

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Tip I read on another forum.

The 1100 caliper sets just a little bit off of straight up and down where the bleeder is located. This allows many times for a very small bubble of air to remain in the caliper no matter how many times nor how diligently you bleed the lines. It only takes a very small amount of air to make the brakes "mushy".

Lossen the upper bolt holding the caliper in place just a bit, then remove the lower bolt. This allows the caliper to pivot slightly so the bleeder valve is straight up and down and the pads are still over the rotors.

In this position, proceed to bleed the brakes as usual and the air bubble will be eliminated and you will have solid brake pressure. Replace and tighten the calipers and ride safely.

Hope this helps, it sure did on mine.
 

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There is also the suck it through method. Put a tube and big syringes on the bleeder and draw the brake fluid and air into the syringe..keep adding fluid to master until no bubbles..so no pumping..just sucking..this method can also be used to change out old brake fluid without introducing air the the system..suck until clean fluid starts to to seen..

You buy a set to do this too..for $20 at HF.
 

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OK so I was having some issues with my brakes.

My old lady was given a vibrating "bullet" as a joke.

I zip tied it to the brake lines and held the lever half way, left it that way till the battery died in the thing.

Now I've taken the time to find one that actually has two "bullets" so you could zip tie one to each of the front brake lines. I even found a code to get 15% off the purchase!

Find the product here and when you check out enter 6GR in the space that says "Coupon or Partner Code"

I know I know...but it did work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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I want to thank everyone for there suggestions. It is slowly getting better every time I work on it.

Thanks again!!!

Randy
 
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