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I recently had to replace my oil pump, shaft and sump pump after a catastrophic failure.
Before I this happened and I had to pull the motor my Wing started and was ready to go even though I as a rule waited till I had 2 bars on the temp gauge. Since I've gotten it all back together I'm having carb issues. Now when I start it it needs to be choked longer, and I have to wait till it really warms up or its very sluggish on acceleration and i get some slight backfiring on deceleration. I've ordered a master rebuild kit from Randakks. Has anyone else experienced this before and if so did you find it was running lean?

Cheers!
 

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I'm not the best person to be replying here, so please wait for other information to weigh against my post.

The mixture on the GL-1200 is not controlled by a rich/lean adjustment as per normal carbs. The mixture is controlled directly by the float adjustment.

I just resurrected a poorly running GL-1200 myself. You'd have been convinced it needed a complete carb rebuild, with all the "trimmings" if you'd have heard it yourself. The word "Tractor" comes to mind.

Poor to warm-up, bad idle until really warm, easy to kill leaving a stopsign, etc. etc. etc.

Seemed to "wake up" sometimes, but not well. The prior owner was baffled, and let it go to me for a song, as he was done futzing with it.

Solution: simply syncing the carbs. It appears that this is the most frequently needed item on GL-1000,1100,1200s. I can't explain WHY they go out of sync like the do - but - note this fact. In the Honda GL-1200 maintenance manual, the carb sync is listed as an 8,000 mile interval service item. For me that means about every-other oil change. (I change at 3,000).

Once I got it thru my head that this was an item needing frequent attention, my GL-1200s have been running just sweetly ever since. It really made me smile to rehabilitate a poorly running GL that the prior owner had given up on. (And took $1,100 for).

Half the time is just taking off the lower parts of the fairing to gain access to the screwholes for the vacuum lines.
 

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I'm no expert either, but have had to remove the carbs at least 4 times in the last 1000 miles on my 84. Twice had bad diaphrams, twice had clogged or partially clogged pilot jets from sitting too long. The pilots will sure cause lean running for sure.
 

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When you pulled the motor, you would have had to pull the carbs off. Check for a bad gasket area where your engine might be sucking air from out side the manifolds.

run some sea foam through your tank to help scrub your carbs out.

After a ride on the wing, pull your plugs & see what color they are. Light tan would be lean to normal where dark or a fluffy build up would be a lil rich.
 

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Yes indeed the carbs were removed and the intake manifold o rings were replaced. I've been leaning towards that slow air valve diaphragm. And also I am thinking that while off some crud dried up then broke loose when new gas was introduced and is now clogging a jet. It actually runs very smooth, it's just the long warm up time and slight backfiring on deceleration and slight sluggishness on acceleration thats happening now. So with the weather inching towards a lot of icy road days Im in no hurry and will be removing them, replacing the diaphragm, and overhauling the carbs, and replacing the vacuum lines just because. I have also rigged up a sync tool that may or may not actually work..lol But I like to tinker around in the shop anyway.
:santawaving:
Cheers!
 
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