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Gavin, you seem to be saying that with the black wire connected to the battery positive the charge voltage is within an acceptable range.
Is that correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Ken, what I am saying is that with the blackwire connected to the positive post on the battery, the drop is 0.3V. Last time I checked it, that 15V preconnection dropped to 14.7V @ 2000 rpm when connected. I have not seen the 16V that was happening earlier in the week.
I did notice that idle was also 15V with the same 0.3V drop when connected.
 

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I will put my 2 cents here:

The Goldwing you have has a SHUNTED charging system,meaning that the alternator is running full output100% of the time and the power that is not used for the "care and running" is redirected to the RR which dissipates it as heat. Running full output does put a load on the engine that actually can be felt.(remember the bicycle generators that ran by rolling on the wheel and when the lights were on it took more effort to pedal)?
The shunt type RR would make a wonderful engine block heater. Sooooo, instead of that you may want to consider a SERIES type RR which, in effect, makes your alternator behave like a cars'. It,as the engine runs, regulates the output by modulating the stator. It supplies no power when it isn't needed and power when it is called for, thereby allowing the stator to run cooler which increases reliability. If your stator is good then keep it's chances of staying good for a long time.
That is what I did to my 1200. I used a CE605 from Roadster Cycle.com and haven't looked back. Installation is easy. You have to remove the old RR and tape up the old plug for saftey then install the new SERIES RR, solder the 3 charge wires to the stator output (yellow wires), heat shrink and tape them, then connect the RR battery wires (2 wires). Thats it, easy peazy. I mounted a LED digital voltmeter on my dash and the output is steady at 13.9 to 14.4 volts.
Why would one even consider a SHUNT type RR ????
 

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I've just finished doing several maintenance items on my new to me '85 LTD. One of the issues I addressed was the wiring between the stator, RR and the battery. I soldered all the connections between the stator and RR, and the charging system. The green ground wires are now connected to a new ground bus I installed. This bus bar is connected directly to the battery providing a good group for the RR. I used the original red/white striped charging wires because there is a capacitor in that circuit.

The black sense wire has been replaced with a switched/fused wire that comes from the battery. The sense wire is used to switch the relay (relays do not require a good power source). I did this because the bike is 30 years old and the sense wire is used by other relays and such. This can potentially drop the sense voltage considerably causing the charging circuit to overcharge the battery.

BeforeI did this wiring change, the charging system would output up to 14.5 or so volts according to the onboard voltmeter. Now the system is rock solid at 13.7V on the highway, well within specs.

The RR is a significant heat sink and I will be looking into the more modern RR to reduce this.

I have detailed what I did on GWDocs.

Hope this helps. Cheers

Ernest
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I will put my 2 cents here:

The Goldwing you have has a SHUNTED charging system,meaning that the alternator is running full output100% of the time and the power that is not used for the "care and running" is redirected to the RR which dissipates it as heat. Running full output does put a load on the engine that actually can be felt.(remember the bicycle generators that ran by rolling on the wheel and when the lights were on it took more effort to pedal)?
The shunt type RR would make a wonderful engine block heater. Sooooo, instead of that you may want to consider a SERIES type RR which, in effect, makes your alternator behave like a cars'. It,as the engine runs, regulates the output by modulating the stator. It supplies no power when it isn't needed and power when it is called for, thereby allowing the stator to run cooler which increases reliability. If your stator is good then keep it's chances of staying good for a long time.
That is what I did to my 1200. I used a CE605 from Roadster Cycle.com and haven't looked back. Installation is easy. You have to remove the old RR and tape up the old plug for saftey then install the new SERIES RR, solder the 3 charge wires to the stator output (yellow wires), heat shrink and tape them, then connect the RR battery wires (2 wires). Thats it, easy peazy. I mounted a LED digital voltmeter on my dash and the output is steady at 13.9 to 14.4 volts.
Why would one even consider a SHUNT type RR ????
Flash,never even thought about a series RR. I will look into this and see if this is an option. Does it not have the black wire coming out of it to the ignition switch?
 

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Sounds a lot like what my 1200 has done for the near 20 plus years I've had a volt meter on her.

They sure will ...... I learned to check mine constantly ..... at least once a week when I'm riding it regular. Daily at least once when on a longer ride or several day's ride. Gonna try a Odyssey PC680 in her when the current wet cell starts showing signs of weakness.

It'll kill a battery in short order if run dry and is a lot like running a bike with no battery .... it'll not do the bike any good either. I have a large squeeze bottle of distilled water with a small tube (used an extra battery vent tube) that's a tight fit in a hole in the cap and I have a rubber "cap" for the tube. No mess filling up the battery to upper line.

Just in case it maybe helps, I include a picture of the Honda page regards the reg/rec unit.
Looked at the schematic posted. I have an '85 LTD and this schematic is correct for it and it does have that white wire off the battery side of the starter solenoid going to a main relay. I looked at the other schematics that are in the Haynes and OEM service manuals and noticed the "white wire" coming off the battery side of the starter solenoid doesn't show up for the non-LTD/SEI bikes until '87. Cheers

Ernest
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Well, thank you for all the advice and feedback. Had the bike serviced with a mechanic friend and charging system is perfect, not sure where the 16V problem went to. In the servicing we replaced broken vacuum lines (you couldn't tell until they were off and bent to see all the splits), removed, rebuilt the carbs and sync'd them, new shock boots, final gear oil replaced). Bike runs like it was brand new. However the fan does not come on....
No power to the temperature sensor under the carbs. Fan works well with power to it. Now need to track down the problem.... oh well. bike is worth all the sleepless nights imagining where the short is.
 

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Well, thank you for all the advice and feedback. Had the bike serviced with a mechanic friend and charging system is perfect, not sure where the 16V problem went to. In the servicing we replaced broken vacuum lines (you couldn't tell until they were off and bent to see all the splits), removed, rebuilt the carbs and sync'd them, new shock boots, final gear oil replaced). Bike runs like it was brand new. However the fan does not come on....
No power to the temperature sensor under the carbs. Fan works well with power to it. Now need to track down the problem.... oh well. bike is worth all the sleepless nights imagining where the short is.

you are saying "a short".... normally that means to ground, and if so, the fan should be running all the time.

The fan switch has one side to ground now, as it is mounted in the radiator.
the other side ( high side of the switch ) goes to the fan motor, which already has 12V applied to it. ( or it should )

If the Fan Motor does not have 12V on it all the time, then you do NOT have a short, you have an OPEN wire/connection some where.

IF there were a SHORT, there would be a fuse blown that you would notice right away.

.
 

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On the four cylinder Wings +12V goes to one terminal of the fan switch which is just forward of the thermostat.
When the switch closes the +12V continues to one side of the fan motor with the other side being permanently grounded.
I have no idea where the fan fuse was relocated to in 1986.
 
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