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Clutch was slipping and fluid was nasty (from PO) so I decided to drain the fluids and replace. I have been trying to get all the air out of lines but it doesn't seem to work. First I need to know 1 thing. I actually closed the bleeder valve all the way and am still get getting air. So is the bleeder screw bad? Shouldn't it be completely air tight after closing?
 

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If you drained the master of fluid and then refilled, then you need to bleed the master first before bleeding the slave.



The clutch line is attached at the master with a banjo nut.Hold the clutch handle in and crack the banjo bolt loose. It should let air and fluid out of the master. Tighten the banjo and let off the clutch handle. You should get pressure at the clutch handle now. You may have to do this a couple of times. Once you don't get any more air at the banjo nut you can bleed the slave. Just don't let the res. go empty on fluid while bleeding or you will have to do thewhole thing all over again.



Kurt
 

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I actually hooked a tube to bleeder screw and closed the screw and tried to bleed again and air brake fluid and air bubbles came through still. I took the bleeder screw out and wrapped teflon tape around it and it took care of the problem. I think I have it. Gonna take it out for a ride and see.
 

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Hand vacuum pump, you'll be killin' yourself any other way.
 

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" Hand vacum pump, you'll be killin' yourself any other way. "

Blackknytecnc,

I'm new to all of this, and am wondering if you could explain
the hand pump to bleed the clutch on the Aspencade ?

I'm soon to get a 1984 Aspendade 1200 and will need to
learn all I can.

Thanks
Roger
 

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It's just a hand operated vacuum bleeder, I got mine at harbor freight. It's got a rubber nipple you hook up to the bleed screw. You crack open the bleeder and start pumping, making sure to keep the level in the master cylinder up. It's a little harder to tell when there's no more air in the system, but I just usually call it at about 4 master cylinders worth of fluid coming out. When I did mine it seemed to handle the banjo bolt for me, but you may not get so lucky. The worst part is the location of the slave cylinder. I'd highly recomend grabbing a book for it.

I found, for whatever reason, the old school "pump the pedal" doesn't work on the wing. But the vacuum bleeder does. Took me three hours of the old methodbefore I gave up and decided I had a bad slave for the clutch and a bad master for the rear. When the guy at the shop told me I didn't have it bled right, I got the pump. Five minutes on each circuit and it was good to go.
 

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I just realized I forgot to throw in my standard warning. If you have to bleed the brakes too, remember that it's linked brakes, so bleed the fronts first or the rear will NOT bleed. Another lesson in "don't do what I did" :cheesygrin:
 

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I've been using a Mighty-Vac for years. Got it from MotionPro. I keep promoting vacuum bleeders here, but seem to meet with a bit of resistance. I don't understand that because they are so inexpexsive considering what they do for you.

I've never had to open the banjo bolts. Just pump until you're getting clear fluid in the hose.
 

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Amen Dennis... Amen...
 

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blackknytecnc,
Thanks for the information on the vacuum pump. I can see how that would be a far better way to perform the bleeding process. I have noted the info. on bleeding the brakes. Thanks for that info as well. I will be looking for a repair manual, I have used manuals in the past and they are great to have on hand. Again I do thank you for the info here.
 

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I want to thank everyone for helping me here. I want to thank Bamaeagle for the link to harbor freight. I have gone there and checked out the vacuum pump. Sense I know at some time in the future I'll be needing one of those I'm gonna go buy one and have it on hand. Bike....and Dennis, You use the Mighty Vac ? I'll do a search for that brand name as well. Again, I want to thank everyone for your help. Y'all are great and and I'm real happy that I came across this site, So a big Thank you goes out you Steve Saunders... Thank You
 

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You can also make a bleeder -

Get a 1 gallon pickle jar.

Find 36" of plastic or rubber tubing where the ID will fit your bleeder nipple >tightly<

Punch a hole in the lid just a whisker smaller than the OD of your tubing.

Make one piece of tubing long enough to go to the bottom of the jar, plus 6 inches. Add an inline coupler so you can add the longer piece of tubing as you need to.

Get 2' of 1" tubing (or whatever size fits your wet/dry vac). Again, make the other hole just slightly smaller than the tube.

force both tubes into place, the smaller tube running to the bottom of the jar.

Seal them both with silicon caulk.

punch multiple small holes around the perimeter of the larger tube, at the end you will connect to the wet/dry vac.

This will prevent a complete suction seal, and will help you control the rate at which the fluid is drawn in to the bleeder.

when you're ready to bleed your system do the following.

connect the longer piece of tubing to the coupler, connect the other end to your brake/clutch.

pour about 1" of brake fluid in the bottom of the jar. Seal the lid.

Connect the larger tube to your wet/dry vac. Power it up.

Control the flow rate by covering/uncovering the holes immediately adjacent to the vac nozzle.

Takes about 90 seconds to bleed the system.

I did this some years ago when I was housebound in a snow storm (living in the mountains of AZ)... I wanted to bleed the brakes but didn't have a vacuum pump.

It worked REALLY well.

I'd rather just use a hand vac pump, but you use what you have...
 

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LOL...
Now that is one heck of a project there. I think I'll stick the Mighty Vac :ROFL::ROFL::ROFL:
 

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I would too.... Although it took about 20 minutes of fiddling to put together. And it kept me busy during a blizzard... Y'know?
 

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Yep, and a job well done because it worked and that's what counts. And yep, I know about the blizzards and out here in Oklahoma we can have some pretty bad ice storms. And when that happens all ya can do is stay inside, keep warm, and listen to the sound of the branches breaking and falling from the trees.:( So... Yep, I know

azdesertdad wrote:
I would too.... Although it took about 20 minutes of fiddling to put together. And it kept me busy during a blizzard... Y'know?
 
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