Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few years ago I tossed the clock on my Aspencade in favor of a voltmeter off an SE-i. I have a watch.
This spring I had a small problem with power supply to the ignition and found the red spade terminal connections on the starter solenoid a bit dirty. I chalked it up to sitting for months on end and after plugging and unplugging a few times, the problem corrected itself.
I've also been noticing the charging system putting out less than usual. It was falling down to 12.8 at idle. I know, some guys think that's acceptable, but I don't. It's always run 13+.
Today I decided to tackle the problem before heading for California next month. The spade terminals on the solenoid were crusty, so I finally broke down and did the main fuse (dogbone) bypass modification and installed a 30 amp in line fuse holder. With very interesting results. The terminals had enough resistance to clamp the amperage returning to the battery, resulting in a lowered charging capacity.
Keep in mind, I have a stock stator and regulator. I performed the mod years ago to take battery voltage to the regulator, rather than sensing off the system voltage. The voltmeter reads actual battery voltage and is accurate. Readings at idle and 3,000 rpm show the regulator is functioning correctly. What a difference!


 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
688 Posts
I think it was your post a while back I followed with a relay to have the reg sense wire read the battery. I have a lithium ion small, small, battery. This way it stays in the 13's all the time, which is important for these batteries. They can't be overcharged or overdrawn. Thanks.
 

·
Impersonating a mechanic
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Dumb question

I've been over your first post in this thread a dozen times and must still be overlooking something:

After cleaning the contacts, your battery is showing 14.25 VDC @ 960 RPM and 13.94 VDC @ 3150 RPM? No comprende. I thought the higher the rpm the higher the voltage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I've been over your first post in this thread a dozen times and must still be overlooking something:

After cleaning the contacts, your battery is showing 14.25 VDC @ 960 RPM and 13.94 VDC @ 3150 RPM? No comprende. I thought the higher the rpm the higher the voltage.
Weird, huh?
The voltage is not rpm dependent. The regulator allows as much to the battery as it deems necessary. Kinda blows the myth about not keeping up at idle, don't it? And it's not uncommon to have a slight voltage decrease as the amperage increases. That's one of the reasons I posted the pics.
When I apply the brakes at idle, the voltage drops to @13.8. Fans kick on and it drops again to 13.2
When I rev to 3,000, it climbs to 14+ again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
The best I remember Mike's bike has been modified so the reference voltage comes straight from the battery. I think that has alot to do with the voltage difference at idle and at 3000rpm.....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,847 Posts
Mine has always charged higher at idle, then tapered off when the motor is revved. When the bike was new, I argued quite a bit with Honda because I thought it was the cause of my many battery failures.

I've also had arguments with folks here about it...
So, anyway, speaking of arguing. I contend that merely refreshing the contacts in the system would have netted similar charge rate improvements.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
279 Posts
when replacing the dog bone fuse would it be beneficial to put di-electric grease on the fuse terminals to insure good contact and no corrosion?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
when replacing the dog bone fuse would it be beneficial to put di-electric grease on the fuse terminals to insure good contact and no corrosion?
Some people recommend coating the dogbone entirely with dielectric grease. Anything that inhibits corrosion is a good thing.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,847 Posts
Wake up Dennis. That's what this post is about. Refreshing contacts. Eliminating dirty connectors. :readit:
Yes, but the wording infers that replacing the dogbone with a spade fuse was responsible for the gain in voltage. I contend that the similar gains would have been seen if the OEM fuse holder had been cleaned and re-used.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Yes, but the wording infers that replacing the dogbone with a spade fuse was responsible for the gain in voltage. I contend that the similar gains would have been seen if the OEM fuse holder had been cleaned and re-used.
No Dennis. The corrosion and resistance was in the spade terminals at the starter solenoid. I could have cleaned the dogbone fuse and contacts until the cows came home without making a difference.
 

·
It aint rocket science
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
Bottom line is those numbers are good.

Just a guess but the flip flop numbers probably have something to do with the limited amperage available at idle and how the system reacts to it. Never seen a car alternator do that and would be unique to the stator system of the 12.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Bottom line is those numbers are good.

Just a guess but the flip flop numbers probably have something to do with the limited amperage available at idle and how the system reacts to it. Never seen a car alternator do that and would be unique to the stator system of the 12.
The flip flop in numbers is a pretty standard occurrence on permanent magnet rotors. I suspect it's because instead of increasing the field like most automotive alternators, they have to cut back on the output. The regulation on our stators work, it's just not very sophisticated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
948 Posts
I'd rather have the clock.

Scott
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top