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bladeruner wrote:
Well I took the 1981 GL1100 forks apart today, didn't think I was going to get the socket head cap screws out of the bottom of the forks. Finally they came out, got the dust covers off and the right side was kinda of rusty under neath, after much tiring got those c clips off. Used the lower forks legs as a slide hammer and they came apart, however the top bushing stayed inside the lower tubes. I don't know to get them out? Also, on top of the seals there was a very thin washer. the right side was causing the rust. My replacement kit I bought from honda did not include those washers. Any suggestions?
The one time that the bushing stayed inside a tube, I used a screwdriver that was bent 90*. If you try this, be very careful not to scratch the inside of the tube.

As far as the washer goes, if you have everything else listed in post #14, thenI do not think that thewasher is required. I don't remember installing the washer on previous rebuilds.

Perhaps another member is more knowledgable about this washer.
 

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I was finally able to get the washer (backup plates) out of the fork lowers, using a steel bar with a steel roll pin drilled through and inserted. I put vise grips on the other end and used a brass 5lb bammer and they (backup plates)came out without damaging the fork lowers. Thanks for the link that was helpful in seeing how the parts should be on the forks. I got all the parts in and tried putting on the right side last night using the PVC pipe on the fork and tried to push the seal in. So far the seal did not want to go in, and I had to stop.
 

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I had put grease on all parts and inside the lower legs top end, but maybe I'm trying to put everything in at the same time and that's not working. Dave0340 gave advise as to, put the bigger fork bushing in first and back up ring in place and then work the seal in. So I will try that next.
 

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Dan, nothing like learning from trial and error! One question, where do you put the oil in during the non-fork removal method? I cant seem to get a clear answer as to how to put oil in the tube while replacing seals without removing the spring. I am assuming you still remove the cap, just pour in the oil then retighten the cap, after getting seal installed. correct? thanks for any help if you get this or not, i know its been a few years since you posted this.
James
 

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Scott, thanks for the input! got those off, no biggie but my problem is getting the seals seated. i have a bad left arm, especially when hammering or like activities. my left arm is numb from trying to drive that seal in there with the 1 1/2" pvc. i can see the top of the groove the circlip goes into, but i cant get it closer. i have been beating it off and on all night, I know, sounds personal, but I am talking about the fork seal! lol. i have moved a milk crate under the fork and using my good right arm to apply the hammering to the seal, but how hard and often do i need to beat it? i put atf on the seal to lubricate it as suggested earlier, is this just the painful part of the process noone has mentioned? thanks!
James
 

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Discussion Starter #109
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It shouldn't take that much work. Slowly compress the fork until it is compressed as far as you can get it. Mark it there and drop it down a couple of inches. That is where you want the pvc to be clamped to the upper fork. Making sure it is even and clamped good and tight, slide the bottom up quickly and it should seat easily. It shouldn't take more than a couple of quick "slams".
I will try to get a couple more pictures soon. I have been meaning to update this thread with better pictures.
I hope this helps.
 

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Well, now that makes more sense! I was using the PVC with 2 hose clamps around it and trying to slam it into the seal!! but I think this is the point of whether or not to just take off the 2 pinch bolts and the top tree bolt and just do it the right way. All it takes is those 6 bolts and removal of the air hose between the fork tubes (which needs to be done to refill fork fluid anyway) and the whole pvc pipe fits right over the whole tube, and bam, in two slams you are done, reassemble and you learn more about forks!!! I think doing this with the forks remaining on the bike is way overrated. I enjoyed and think that removing the forks was much easier and more rewarding, since putting something so crucial back together in exact measures using correct torques is worth the effort. My bike now runs smooth! that '82 feels new and smooth on the road! but thanks for the tutorial, i think i am ready to take on more fork seal jobs since some videos on youtube show that fork tubes are very similar and there is some money to be made in that department!
 

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I would like to know if there is a preferred weight and type of Fork Oil and how many CC/OZ in each tube?. I have an 86 1200 Interstate and usually will ride at max GVWR (me gear, wife and the bike). I have the Progressive fork springs, unless the POR lied to me. I think Progressive recommends 20wt on the GL1200.
With forks on bike and upper airlines removed,
I once drained and filled the fork tubes on my CB900C via the side drain hole, using a large hypo dermic marked with CC measures and a tube with rubber taper on end. Worked great but had a helper at ready to screw the drain bolt back in when I pulled the hose off.
 

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I just finished reading this post, and wish I had seen it a few years ago, as when I put new seals in my 86 Aspy. Great post, should help a lot of people a whole lot!
 

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Hello,



Today I attempted to change out my fork seals using this excellent tutorial...and I'm having difficulty.



After removing the top cap, bottom bolt, fork guts, the dust seal and retaining ring, I can't seem to get the upper and lower forks to separate, or to get the old seal to pop out.



I've tried the method mentioned in the tutorial of pulling the tubes apart to create a slide-hammer-ish motion, and after much banging, it's still a no-go.



Can anyone shed some light on what I'm doing wrong?



Yes, I'm new here...please see my intro in the new members area!



Thanks,



The Shadow
 

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Generous application of PB Blaster, heat from a pencil torch and literally destroying & prying out the old seal finally succeded in allowing me to get the uper & lower fork tubes apart. The problem was that over the course of 20+ years, the seal had bonded exceedingly well with the aluminum of the lower tube.

Problem solved!
 

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86 aspencade

just did one of the forks. I compressed the fork after rebuild, but before I reinstalled it to the triple trees. That's when I noticed a small hole at the top of the fork tube. Am I missing a gasket? Is this for the air ride? Is there a specific location that hole shoukd be facing when I reinstall it to the triple tree? Thank you in advance
 

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Just so every one knows tat has an aspencade. There is a small hole at the top of the fork tube. This hole shoukd be lined up towards the rider. Don't worry about the height at which it will rest. The c clip will let you know when to stop. The hole is for air ride. Nothing plus into it. It lines up with a grooved channel inside the upper triple tree. Thanks fir all the help every body.

Ps, this is why no one uses the search function. Because when you do and you revive an old thread. No one answers.
 
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