Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
GL1200 1984
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, .

Long story short; bought myself '84 GL1200 Interstate couple of years ago, stripped it to the bare bones and trashed all the fairings
along the way. While putting it back together replaced stator, wheel bearings, fork seals and bunch of seals and gaskets.
I got it back to together this spring and amazingly it also started right off - but unfortunately with only two front cylinders running.
I've been trying to narrow the problem down about two weeks to no avail.

First I thought problem was fuel related because I'm SURE it had spark in all plugs, but not anymore. So took the carbs out and cleaned
everything. Actually did it three times. All jets ok, no stuck floats, levels ok and fuel in the bowls.

Well, as that didn't help I moved on to the ignition parts; cleaned connections, measured everything as per Clymer manual and also tried to
switch the coils. No spark. Finally bought a used ICM module, but the rear cylinders are dead and cold.

Then I read about measuring the pulse generators AC volts during cranking as the resistance might not tell everything. One PG showed
apx .5 AC volts but the secondary just barely 0.1 AC volts and very randomly. So PG busted?

I've been doing some short test rides and it does run fairly ok. It has some power loss and sounds like a twin but hey, it runs ;)
While riding couple days ago I noticed that the rear cylinders do start firing when the engine is revved about 4000rpms but not below that.
Don't know the actual rpm because my aftermarket tach doesn't play along at the moment. Would a broken PG behave this way?

Any ideas welcome before I begin to dig the PGs out from the rear (sigh).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,659 Posts
If you think about any generator. Be it an alternator, generator, or pulse generator, the faster they turn the more they put out. It is possible the high RPM makes just enough "power" from the PG to start firing. Be careful with these bikes. They can fool you into thinking they are running on 4 cylinders when they are running on 2. At a certain point the inertia will carry the engine right over the two dead cylinders and seem like they are making power.Especially if you are not familiar with the engine/bike. I have doubts about .1 (point one) output from the PG but certainly random can't be right. Did you check with the engine at idle? How about 3,000 RPM?
What puzzles me is that at the start of your post you wrote you were "SURE" it had spark. Then at the end of your post you noted no spark when you switched coils? Also how did you switch the coils? Did you do plug wires, and primary wiring?
 

·
Registered
GL1200 1984
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
What puzzles me is that at the start of your post you wrote you were "SURE" it had spark. Then at the end of your post you noted no spark when you switched coils? Also how did you switch the coils? Did you do plug wires, and primary wiring?
I'm certain that it runs with all four, because it will also heat up the exhaust manifolds for cyls 3 and 4, which doesn't happen when idling. It also gives a turbo-like kick when higher rpms are reached.

Very first thing I tested was the spark plugs taking them one at a time out and verified they had all spark when cranking. When I later did the same test plugs for cylinders 3 and 4 didn't have spark anymore, but at this point I'm beginning to doubt myself.

I took the coil pack out, turned it over (right coil would be left) and connected primary and secondary wires to it.

Haven't tested the AC volts while running the engine, just when cranking.
 

·
Registered
GL1200 1984
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Ok, got it sorted out. Problem was the air gap between the left PG and rotor, which was clearly too big. I loosened the PG and adjusted the gap apx same as the right side and all four cylinders started firing.

I'd also like to break the myth that the engine has to be removed in order to access the pulse generators on '84 GL1200. All that needs to be removed is the battery to make enough room for tools.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top