Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1986 GL1200 Interstate. It has developed a knocking sound whenever I accelerate or decelerate, kind of like someone hitting the area around the transmission with a hammer. It is only one knock each time. There is no vibration, just a single knock each time I give it throttle, or release the throttle. I was thinking it was the Universal joint, but I am not sure. Any ideas on what is causing this sound?:?
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,341 Posts
Could be several things. U-joint is one possibility. Pull the rear wheel off and start looking there. If it's clunking, it should be obvious.
How long since you had the back end apart?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
578 Posts
I'd go with the U/J, as it takes up the slack the spider (cross) in the centre moves until under tension, normally with a clunk or knock, but as already said it would be worth pulling the diff as 1200's can have an issue with bearing/housing wear in the rear part of the drive line.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
223 Posts
I hope it isn't this, but check your spline that connects the rear wheel to the differential. The piece gets worn, and shortly after it starts knocking, It will strip out. The replacement isn't cheap. It calls for replacing the entire differential. I've chewed up three. The 86 was sort of a ******* year in that Honda changed the design. Earlier models can fit, but require some lathe time to make it fit.
What really burns me about this is, that the spline, and rear wheel fitting could be sold seperately-But isn't! That piece of the spline can be driven out with a hammer, and put back in the same way. Instead they get to stick you with buying a whole new differential.
Be very cautious about buying one used online, I"ve seen sellers pass off ones that are "Slightly worn" "Ask for photos of both parts. If they are remotely questionable, Don't touch them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, Purple Rider, you seem to be spot-on with where the sound is coming from. I had my brother help me in checking the exact location of where the knock was coming from, and the area you just described seems to be it. Ugh! Guess I will be dropping the rear soon to find out. Thanks for all the info, guys!
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
First off it's not a differential, a much different critter. The best fix for a damaged 1200 final drive is to replace it with a final drive from a 1500. It's a good fix because if you get a '90 or later final from a 1500 you get a five pin driven flange and replaceable rubber and aluminum blocks instead of the molded in ones that can't be replaced. You'll need the final and a 1500 rear wheel but it's worth it. Here's some info from the forum. If you do a search on the 'net you should be able to find the pictorial of doing the swap.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums...4299-final-drive-swap-gl1500-into-gl1200.html
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,341 Posts
Before you start junking the bike, it might be best to take it apart and have a look. It could also just be something loose.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
223 Posts
I'm sorry to be right on that one. If you've pulled a trailer much, like I have, my thinking is that's what takes it out. Everyone has told me to use Moly-desulfide grease, because that doesn't go away when it gets wet or washed. My spring checkup includes pulling the rear to check the grease. I've been searching for that specific grease, with little luck finding it. A good alternative has been high pressure mining machine grease, recommended to me by a local lubricants guru.

Now, someone fill me in on this 1200-1500 differential swap! Gimme the lowdown on what parts are needed. If I know then I promise to document on how to do it, and make it available to everyone. I'll even show you pictures of me washing my hands after I'm done!
 

·
It aint rocket science
Joined
·
3,967 Posts
I hope it isn't this, but check your spline that connects the rear wheel to the differential. The piece gets worn, and shortly after it starts knocking, It will strip out. The replacement isn't cheap. It calls for replacing the entire differential. I've chewed up three. The 86 was sort of a ******* year in that Honda changed the design. Earlier models can fit, but require some lathe time to make it fit.
What really burns me about this is, that the spline, and rear wheel fitting could be sold seperately-But isn't! That piece of the spline can be driven out with a hammer, and put back in the same way. Instead they get to stick you with buying a whole new differential.
Be very cautious about buying one used online, I"ve seen sellers pass off ones that are "Slightly worn" "Ask for photos of both parts. If they are remotely questionable, Don't touch them.
How many miles are on your ride?
 

·
Just Winging It
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
I agree with Bike...and Dennis a loose axle nut or shock it is worth a look. Pull the tire and check things out. Also there was no mention of the possibility of those original bad bearing choice Honda made in the tire often characterized as a clunky noise. Just saying there may be a less expensive fix.
 

·
Junior Grue
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
The clunking you describe is usually worn splines.

You'll find out when you pull the wheel and final drive.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
The proper lubricant for the splines anywhere on a Goldwing is MOLYBDENUM PASTE. Not molybdenum grease, it has to be Molybdenum paste of 60% molybdenum. Honda 60. Loctite also has moly paste 51048 in 8oz. jar for about $26. The stuff isn't cheap but there's no recommended substitute. Use the right stuff for the splines it's cheaper than replacing them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
223 Posts
Hmm, guess I'm making tracks to my local bearing dealer. $26 is dirt in comparison to a $500 repair. Now I gotta date with my wrenches.
 

·
Junior Grue
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
Hmm, guess I'm making tracks to my local bearing dealer. $26 is dirt in comparison to a $500 repair. Now I gotta date with my wrenches.
You've identified that it is a bearing without digging into it?:?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I had to change out my final drive and driven flange after only 60K miles, but was SO lucky to find a drive on ebay for $15 'BUY IT NOW' so I did (they average about $300 used) that had decent pics and the gear was not worn. I took a chance on it. The driven flange had to be purchased new ($95-OUCH!) but all is working good. Those gears need to be lubed often! Every year for sure. I got some really good hi-moly grease from a mechanic friend, but even so, it dries out. If I have to do it again, I'll go the 1500 route because a lot of 1500's are converted to trikes and there is more availability of rear wheels and tires cheap, and beefier brakes to boot with very little modification to make it fit. If you have an 86 and look for a driven flange (the gear that goes on the wheel) it needs to be for an 86...84-85's are a different size.
As the gears wear out, there is more lag time so more of a clunk when engaging. Most noticeable for me when shifting as I tend not to back off and then stomp on it...I'm a Grampa driver.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
One thing to remember is that the six pin flanges need lubrication, a thin coating of Moly Paste on the pins. The five pin flanges on the '90 and later 1500s are assembled dry with no lube.
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
2,410 Posts
Hopefully it is not the engine output slines, or the final drive output splines. If it is just a U joint, you're in luck, those are cheap and replaceable. Anything else is going to cost you. The 1200 has a lot of splines. There is the male ouput splines from the transmission, which connect to the female input splines in the U joint, then the female splines on the other side of the U joint that connect to the male splines on the front end of the driveshaft, then the male splines on the other end of the driveshaft that connect to the final drive gearcase, then the male splines on the back of the gearcase that connect with the female splines on the final driven flange, which attaches to the rear wheel using molded in rubber bushings (meaning they can't be replaced) On top of all that, some '84 and '85 models had a defective from the factory rear wheel, and the right side wheel bearing did not fit right. I had one of those wheels. I was lucky and was able to get an '86 or '87 wheel from a local member.

A big part of the reason I'm keeping my 1200 is because, despite all the problems I've had with it, is because I believe the engine/transmission are sound, and I know for a fact the rear drive, from the engine output shaft to the rubber dampers in the rear wheel are like new, and are now well coated in Moly paste
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I forgot to mention that my 86 Goldwing only has 32,000 miles on it and as far as I know, has never pulled a trailer.
 

·
Just Winging It
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
Let us know what you find when you pull the rear end apart.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top