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I am probably going about this wrong but I blew the guts out of my rear shock. I have the replacement oil seal. I also have the Powersportspro diagram showing order but what is the orientation of the parts and how much transmission fluid do I put back in.

Note to self: next time figure out how to catch the parts before scattering them in an oily mess in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket.
 

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the body bushing goes in first, with the open side towards the TOP of the shock. there is a circlip that installs in the body to keep it form going too far. the washer goes in next, no special alignment there. then the seal, seal retainer, and finally the circlip. replace boot, and reinstall. it helps when filling the oil to block the airline and pour the oil in before installing any of the above. IIRC fill is 225 cc of oil.
 

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Thanks, I was able to find what I needed after I searched long enough. It seemed a lot of threads asked the same ? And many of them dwindled off without an affirmative answer. Thanks to one of the Guru's earlier suggestions though, what I did was pull the other shock and this time I stuck a piece of dowel rod through the eye of the shock to catch the parts. So I was able to finish the first one. I had been pretty sure about the oil seal but wasn't sure about the guide. The both go in open side first or flat side towards the open end. The whole operation took about3 hrs. The third hour was spent encouraging the oil in to the shock because I did not do it during the install. I did not even remove the bags. Some body had suggested earlier that you should do one shock at a time. Since I pulled both shocks I found I had more room. I mounted both top sides then slide a wedge under the back tire to mount the bottom pins. I had a funnel that just fit over the air connection and I pumped the back tire up and down to draw in the fluid. I used 8.8 ounces of ATF because somebody said they had instructions that said that. My rear end feels much more secure on high speed curves. My next step will be figuring out how to change the oil in the front forks with out pulling them.

Again thanks
 

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changing front fork oil is easy. there is a drain plug on the center bottom of the trac unit. also remove the fork cap (carefully they are under spring pressure) this will allow the forks to drain. reinstall drain plug, fill with oil, reinstall fork cap (sounds worse than it is) and you are done.
 

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travelinmays wrote:
My next step will be figuring out how to change the oil in the front forks with out pulling them.
travelinmays, as Scott said there are drain plugsnear the bottom of both forks (on the rear of the leg next to the anti-dive valve).. To re-fill you can either pull the top spring caps ( a real pain by yourself) OR, pullthe air line (R/H side up under the top plastic filler cover & glove box) then use a vacuum pump on the air line & suck the oil back into each leg through the drain plug hole (use a plastic connector that you force into the drain hole & length of hose).. It will suck right in & if you maintain a slight vacuum it won't leak when you re-install the drain plug (do one side at a time)..

Twisty
 

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Thanks will do. I am amazed at the diffence in my rear suspension. Both shocks looked like they had a mixture of tar and brown water in them. I suspect the front will be as bad. When I had the shocks apart I filled them with carb cleaner and let them soak for a bit. Would it be a good Idea to suck some cleaner up into the front fork or am I likely to damage a seal.
 

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shouldnt hurt anything, but I would use a high detergent oil like tranny fluid, run it for a week, and change it again. worst thing to happen would be to score the inner wall on the lower tube. this would cause binding and poor operation. lack of lube (like when using a solvent) COULD cause this. ATF is the reccomended lube, so no harm will come from using it.
 

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I will run an ounce of magic Sea Foam in each for a week.
 

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Thanks to all and Major Kudos to Twisty. Twisty suggested using an air line to fork and drawing a vacuum on it to put the oil back in. What I did was remove the air by accessing the manual fill valve on the left fork then I removed the shraider valve. I then connected a small reversible air pump. I pulled a vacuum removed both drains and inserted hoses into both drain holes. I then flipped the switch on the air pump and pumped all the old oil in to catch bottles. I emptied the catch bottles and put a small about of sea foam in each an sucked that up in to the fork I left the pump on suck for 10 min so that the seafoam would be agitated by bubbles in each fork. I then blew out the sea foam and let the pump blow for 5 min. I then put 10 ounces in each catch bottle and switched to vacuum again. After sucking in the ATF I left the pump in suck while reinstalling the plugs. Total time to change the fluid was about 30 min. The bike now floats down the road. It amazes me how many chores the manuals make overly complicated and impossible to discourage the home mechanic. Mine says that you have to remove the front forks to do this. Do you think they actually go through all that crap. Again thanks and Mana isn't good enough for Twisty I think we need to add Kudos to his list of awards.:toast:
 
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