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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I did the poor boy alternator conversion on my 84 Aspencade two years ago. After doing so, I also installed a new battery. Had no problems the first year until it was almost time to put it away for the winter when I noticed the battery seemed to be getting weak. The following spring after getting the bike out I load tested the battery and it was shot. It was a cheap battery, and I figured maybe I just got a bum battery. Last year I went to Batteries Plus and bought a high end sealed battery and figured my problems would be solved. Same thing happened to me this year. The battery will not keep a charge. The bike runs great, and after riding it the battery voltage is always at 12.6, but seems to keep burning up batteries. All the recommended parts were used, and instructions were followed to a tee during installation. After putting a voltmeter on it and watching during accelerating, it seems to me I may be getting too much of a charge from the alternator and keep frying the batteries. After riding the bike 40 miles today, I pulled the battery after 2 hours and it was still warm. Has anyone had this experience? Is it possible to put a voltage regulator in the system? Thanks in advance for any feedback.
 

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After putting a voltmeter on it and watching during accelerating, it seems to me I may be getting too much of a charge from the alternator and keep frying the batteries.
Welcome to the forum.

When you say "too much of a charge" what are the numbers?
The alternator you're using has a built in regulator and if it's over charging that internal regulator needs changing.
 

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...After putting a voltmeter on it and watching during accelerating, it seems to me I may be getting too much of a charge from the alternator and keep frying the batteries...


You need to tell us how many volts you are seeing on the meter. Otherwise its hard for us to advise you properly.
 

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Batteries will be charged above 13.5 volts and some modern alternators charge as high as 14.7 volts. 12.5 volts is the resting voltage of a fully charged battery, if you have just finished running your bike the voltage should be considerably higher than 12.6 volts.
 

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check where your alt "exciter" wire is connected to,make sure its connected to a key on source only,otherwise it will discharge your battery,but your charging voltage may be too high too because of a bad internal regulator in the alternator as everyone has previously stated
 

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Go back to the stock stator!
I've been waiting years to say that!!
Seriously though, the alternator is internally regulated. It should top out at @ 14.2-14.4 volts. Too much more than that, you'll fry batteries.
I'm not sure if you can get the regulator(s) separate anymore. Some brands yes, some brands no.
If you're charging @14.8+, the regulator is not cutting back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update

Thanks for the replies. Today I took the battery back to see if I can get a replacement for it as it is still under warranty so I can't do any more testing until I find out what's going to go on with that. When I put the multimeter on it last year during acceleration if I remember correctly it would skyrocket to 16-17 volts. At idle it would be at around 10 volts output. I'll do another test when I get a battery back and give a definite numbers report. I'm also going to check the "exciter" wire from the alternator to make sure it is to a keyed connection. If it is the regulator in the alternator I'm hoping I can purchase that separately. If not I may tear it down and switch back to a standard stater. :praying:
 

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As you already have the external alternator going back to a stator makes no sense.

If the alternator is at fault and not rebuild-able you'd still be time and money ahead getting a new one rather than pulling the engine to install a new stator and possibly a new regulator/rectifier.

I'm not saying one is better than the other, only that it's easier to deal with what you've got.
 

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I'm not saying one is better than the other, only that it's easier to deal with what you've got.
The external alternator puts out more, is cheaper, far less in labor to replace.
In those terms, it's better than the stock stator.
If you've already carved up the bike putting an external on it, there's no reason to go back to the low output stock stator.
I was just kiddin'..........sort of.;)
 

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The external alternator puts out more, is cheaper, far less in labor to replace.
In those terms, it's better than the stock stator.
But if you want your bike stock which some do replacing the stator makes sense.

However in this case he already has the external alternator so going back to a stator as I said makes no sense.
 

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But if you want your bike stock which some do replacing the stator makes sense.

However in this case he already has the external alternator so going back to a stator as I said makes no sense.
There's an echo in here....
 

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Why not just add a external regulator.
 

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Hey pardner..that thar alternator is putting out to much @ 17v...I don't know what type of alternator you have thar but if it's internal regulated..the regulator is bad..if you are pretty good at tear down and rebuild..check your rectifiers very closely and replace even if one just shows a little off the scale..most DC batteries do not like the AC current that tries to leak through a bad diode rectifier bridge..you can check stator windings and insulators while you in there too..if all checks out,simply replace the regulator and by all means please CHECK ALL INSULATORS,BRUSHES and ROTOR INSULATORS..a lot of guys that think they know how to rebuild alternators and starters overlook an overheated/melted insulator on the rotor or rectifier bridge and output post..try to replace them with original insulators(new rectifiers come with insulators pressed in place) but you can make you own with some ABS plastic and such from the hardware store..just make sure that it is a non-conductive type of plastic(yes there are some that will conduct when a little warm from melt through..how I know??I see them thar things in and out of the plant all day when metal particals get thrown around and copper embed itself to make some type of ground path/or postive path to start destruction within the plastics..these things can burn up regulators,diodes,diode trio's and in some high end electronic regulated alternators in a heartbeat..some alternators are internal fan cooled,some external cooled while some don't (special apps for those with-out the fans) have fans..please make sure yours do have some type of fan built with the alternator..this HELPS a lot to keep the unit from running too hot while charging..the regulator see's this and try to adjust and compensate but the circuit inside the electronic regulator can blow it's diodes and resistors and give it one or two values..dead or overcharge..this will indeed put undue stress everywhere in the charging system and in some cases the electrical system..electrical system componets such as stereo,igniters,coils,lighting etc,etc will be taken out..even more so if AC current starts it's path, DC componets do not like AC so all they like to do is fry and make you cry..so please look things over and nail this down and do careful checks on your repair..an alternator is the way to go but cross you I's and dot your T's when getting into electrical charging systems..now go git 'er dun!!
 

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Take the alternator to any alternator repair shop and they can fit a new rectifier into it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Update on Poor Boy conversion output

Hi again everyone. Well Batteries Plus honored their warranty and gave me an new battery. Took the alternator to the local electrical repair shop. They tested the output of the alternator which was a max of 14.2v at about 50 amps, which I was told to be normal, and everything checked out fine with the alternator. After reinstalling the alternator I did some more voltage testing. At 2500, 3000, and 4000 rpm, I am getting a solid reading of 14.39v output. At idle, I start at about 12.6v and drop voltage the longer the bike stays running. I'm wondering if my mulitimeter could be that far off? Checked the wiring which seemed to be fine. The exciter wire is connected to the positive terminal on the fuse box above the air filter box. One concern I have is that I also have the other wire(there are two wires coming out of the round plastic output plug (I seen the name for it on the site and have searched and searched for it and cannot find the diagram) spliced with the exciter wire going to the fuse box. Could this cause a problem?:? I'm just wondering why I'm getting a reading of 14.39v when the professional testing bench showed a max output of 14.2. Does anyone think 14.39 volts is enough to fry batteries. I've been through two in two years and It's the only idea that I have which may be the cause. Thanks for any input. And also for the you tube video. A great idea.
 

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What size is the pulley on the crankshaft?
I believe early versions of the Poorboy used a pulley equal in size to the alternator pulley which didn't turn some alternators fast enough to charge at idle.

And no 14.39v will not fry your battery.
 

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If you installed the poorboy two years ago and haven't had any problems until now, then the regulator is faulty, or your belt is too loose.
They tested the alternator output good, but you don't seem to be keeping up at idle.
 

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Hi again everyone. Well Batteries Plus honored their warranty and gave me an new battery. Took the alternator to the local electrical repair shop. They tested the output of the alternator which was a max of 14.2v at about 50 amps, which I was told to be normal, and everything checked out fine with the alternator. After reinstalling the alternator I did some more voltage testing. At 2500, 3000, and 4000 rpm, I am getting a solid reading of 14.39v output. At idle, I start at about 12.6v and drop voltage the longer the bike stays running. I'm wondering if my mulitimeter could be that far off? Checked the wiring which seemed to be fine. The exciter wire is connected to the positive terminal on the fuse box above the air filter box. One concern I have is that I also have the other wire(there are two wires coming out of the round plastic output plug (I seen the name for it on the site and have searched and searched for it and cannot find the diagram) spliced with the exciter wire going to the fuse box. Could this cause a problem?:? I'm just wondering why I'm getting a reading of 14.39v when the professional testing bench showed a max output of 14.2. Does anyone think 14.39 volts is enough to fry batteries. I've been through two in two years and It's the only idea that I have which may be the cause. Thanks for any input. And also for the you tube video. A great idea.
Clip the other wire off, one wire to excite the alternator. 8 volts is enough to excite with,I used a wire with 14+ volts and fried the regulator.
 
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