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Bike starts getting hot after about 10-15 miles as soon as I get in town temp goes up. Fan works, Pump works.
I don't read that it's overheating, only that it runs hot.
Does the fan just come on, or does it cycle on and off?
And what else have you done lately with the cooling system?
 

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A slow accumulation of heat, and the inability to remove it does suggest a partially plugged radiator. Most rad shops will flow check it for next to nothing. No sense in pressure testing it if it doesn't leak.
Generally a bad cap continues to allow flow to the recovery bottle.
What is your rad cap/recovery bottle "doing"?
 

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Great ideas ya'll. I don't have an infrared sensor but she feels hot to me when I stop. Hose seemed stiff enough when I took it off to change thermostat and change timing belts.
If it were just an indication problem, the cooling fans would cycle normally. You say they come on and stay on. If that's the case, then the thermo switch AND the gauge are faulty?
If it reads hot, and the fans stay on, then it is hot.
Take your stand-by radiator to a radiator shop and have it FLOW tested. Then install it.
 

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Rod out costs money. Boiling out costs money.
A reputable shop will flow test before any repair. If there is little or restricted flow, then action needs to be taken. If not, it's generally a "no charge", and you're good to go.
I use Performance Radiator. I think they're nationwide. Let them make the decision.
But remember, the radiator you're taking in, is NOT the one you have a problem with.
If changing radiators solves your concern, then the original radiator needs attention.
If a "good flowing " radiator doesn't correct the problem, you can look somewhere else.
 

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I specifically asked in post #10 about your recovery system.
You said it was okay. Now you say it doesn't pull back coolant.
They are not overflow tanks. They are storage for the coolant "recovery" system.
Inspect your radiator cap and you'll see TWO seals. One for the top of the radiator neck, and one for the lower portion.
The area in the neck between these two seals is the "operating chamber" that allows the recovery system to work.
As the coolant increases in temperature, the pressure increases, because it is a closed system. To allow for expansion, the radiator cap (lower seal) vents coolant to the recovery bottle.
As the coolant decreases in temperature, it creates a low pressure area in the radiator and the coolant is then drawn back in to the radiator, past the same seal, thus keeping the cooling system "full" at all times.
The seal at the top ensures that the system stays tight. If coolant can leak out, air can leak in. If air can leak in, the coolant will NOT be drawn back into the system. You end up with a FULL bottle, and a LOW radiator. After repetitive "cycles", the system
will eventually overheat.
If your seals are badly worn, or cracked, replace the cap. If the seals appear good, have the cap tested to ensure it is operating correctly.
Inspect the sealing surface of the radiator neck for both seals. Make sure there are no "nicks" or low spots that would affect the operation of the system.
Inspect the hose between the radiator neck and the recovery bottle. No leaks, clamps in place?

Commonly overlooked is the upper portion of the neck where the radiator cap "locks" into position. This is a double step.
Once the cap is snug, you must PUSH DOWN and TURN the cap for proper seal. Unfortunately, some owners lack "finesse" and jamb the cap opening it or securing it, which causes the tangs on the neck to be deformed. This will result in no seal or poor seal and negatively affect the operation of the entire cooling system.
 
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