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Ole Guy
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When your dust boots finally wear out, here is another option for replacement in addition to Honda stock dust boots if still available, or the Shock Mate SA-1995.

I used a 6 ½” piece of 2.50/2.75-21 inner tube.


Supplies:
2.50/2.75 inner tube
2 each 3’ hose clamps
2 each 2’ hose clamps
Grease


Place the bike on the center stand. Remove the saddle bags. Remove the lower shock bolts. Remove the old dust boots. The bare shock looks pretty good but will soon collect debris.


Measure the length needed. They need to be long enough for the maximum extension. With the swing arm free and suspended at the lower stop (rear tire is off the ground), it measured approximately 5 ½ inchesfrom the top from the upper groove on the shock’s main body to the bottom of the shock tube. The shock bolt holes were another ½ inch lower. I added another ½ inch for some overhang. I cut the tube pieces 6 ½ inches long. The tube curves some so cut the ends square by figuring in some angle. The old dust boot pieces are shown for comparison. The inside diameter of the dust boots is narrower than the tube, so there is plenty of room in the tube.


The cut tube at 6 1/2 inches.


The inside of the inner tube must be thoroughly washed clean of the white powder; I believe it is some form of powder acid used in the molding process. Dish detergent worked. Clean the lower tubes spotless, especially near the upper seal. Use your finger to feel for smoothness. Apply some grease to the lower tubes so the inner tubes slide freely when the shocks compresses. I used some white lithium. The tube’s diameter was a bit smaller than the upper body, so I rolled the top of the tube over so it would roll up on the body easier (see photo below). Little WD40 might make things slide too.


Seat the top of the tube neatly in the upper groove then place the 3’ hose clamp on and then tighten it. Install the shock bolts.


Open the 2’ hose clamp all the way then place it over the tube then close it. Close the clamp down about half way and position near the bottom. The crease formed itself, but adjust it as needed.



About ½ inch of tube needs to be pulled back towards the upper side to accommodate for the full travel of the shock when extended. This was approximately ½ inch in this case. The extra diameter of material on the bottom folds neatly by itself as the clamp tightened. There was a little pulling and adjusting to get it neatly tucked. The extra over hang helps give you something to work with and keeps it from flipping out the clamp as it is tightened completely.


On the left side, at the bottom of the shock the break line is close. Make certain the hose clamp band (over hang) does to contact the break line.


The rest of the shots are to show the finish job left and right.












[align=center] A view of the completed dust boot installed:
[/align]

 

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Nice! Thanks.
 

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Premium Member
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Very useful tip, thanks. New rubbers(when you can find them), are $20/25 each...:gunhead:
 

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This is a good thread, I'll move it into the Reference forum now.
 

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Thanks for the great tip, I'm betting you just saved alot of folks some money and extended the life of a lot of shocks:bowing:
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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Ole Guy sent me a note to add a last picture to his post, so go back up above and see the very last pix of the completed dust boot.

Great project, and saves a lot of money. :waving:
 

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