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I was just wondering if you can install a statror for a limited 1200 in an aspencade 1200. Is this possible? Thanks!!
 

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I was just wondering if you can install a statror for a limited 1200 in an aspencade 1200. Is this possible? Thanks!!
Yes and no.
You cannot simply buy a Limited stator and install it. They're physically different.
You can, however, replace the rear case from an LTD, on an '85 engine and install all Limited parts. (Stator/rotor/regulator/rectifier.)
Here's the pinch. If you have an '85 aspy, you must use the '85 Limited rear case. If you have an '86 aspy, you must use the SE-i rear case. They ARE different.
 

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Yes and no.
You cannot simply buy a Limited stator and install it. They're physically different.
You can, however, replace the rear case from an LTD, on an '85 engine and install all Limited parts. (Stator/rotor/regulator/rectifier.)
Here's the pinch. If you have an '85 aspy, you must use the '85 Limited rear case. If you have an '86 aspy, you must use the SE-i rear case. They ARE different.
That's all correct. To clarify, the LTD rear case is enlarged to cater for the physically larger stator assembly.
 

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Stator replacement

Thanks to Steve's video's and instructions I was able to pull the engine today. Super helpful, thanks!

Only challenge I've found is that I can't pull the rear case off when replacing the stator, it clunks against something in/on the output shaft area? Anybody know what's happening, and how I can get around it? :)

1987 Goldwing Aspencade
 

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On the '87s, (and only the 87s) there's parts preventing the rear case from sliding off. The stoppage you're feeling in on the final output shaft.

Take a look at the on-line parts fiche's.. There's a bolt and bolt-lock on the final drive that prevents the output shaft from coming out of the gears. To access it you have to remove the side cover (just under the fuel pump).

It sucks, I know.
 

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Before you take the side cover off...

Try removing the oil-seal (the one around the final output shaft). You may damage the oil-seal beyond usage in doing so. But they're like $10-$15 new. So get one anyway.

There may be a snap-ring that's holding it on. Try there first.
 

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Welcome to the forum, David.
I think Vmsguy has you covered. Please come back and let us know how things went with the re-install and how the new stator works.
 

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Thank you for the Welcome Dennis!

I love this site! VMSGuy was spot on.......I choose option one first, because it was least destructive (gasket survived as well). Remove the side cover located beneath the fuel pump and on the shaft there are 2 screws (with retainers) in the shaft. Stuff a rag into the open engine/gearbox forward of the area, then super duper carefully remove the screws and retainers such that they don't fall in! After that the cover slides right off! And please note that this is on a 1987 1200 Aspencade. .....now I wait for the Stator and Gaskets to arrive....... :)

Thanks for your tremendous help fellas!
 

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Glad you got the cover off.

When you put the new stator in....

1. Clean-up the hole where the stator wires come through the cover.
2. Put a little oil on the o-ring on the stator wires. This will let it slide into that hole better.
3. Do NOT start the screws securing the stator to the cover until you've pulled the wires through and secured the plug with a snap ring on the outside of the cover.
4. Now put the screws securing the stator in.

In case you haven't guessed... I've replaced a stator or two.... The latest.. surprise, surprise.. an '87 Aspy.

P.S. Before re-installing the engine... inspect the clutch slave cylinder, make sure it's clean.
 

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OK, you guys are my favorite, thanks for the advice! :)

One lingering question is whether or not I should solder the wires versus using a replacement connector, as it seems it's why the stator failed (burnt prong on connector)? If I keep this thing sealed with electro-grease will it fail again? Or clip the connector and solder it? Or????? We bought this bike on Saturday (expecting a failed stator), tested, then had the engine out on Sunday, and hope to have it running again next Saturday. 50K on the engine, new tires, new AGM battery, looks nice, tranny's solid, suspension's solid, can't wait to run it again. This thing drives quite a bit nicer than my old CBX!
 

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PS....what's a reasonable timeframe to pull and replace a stator? I'm mechanically strong (mechanical designer/now IS geek), have the tools, and the desire. :)
 

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PS....what's a reasonable timeframe to pull and replace a stator? I'm mechanically strong (mechanical designer/now IS geek), have the tools, and the desire. :)
Were it me, I'd take a couple of days to clean up the frame and motor before putting it back in, and check all the little bits that are easier to get at with the motor out. But that's me. In a hurry, 6~8 hours is possible. Maybe less. Do you have the book? There is a definite sequence for putting the bolts back in and I found it makes a big difference. Also there is an adjustment Honda recommends to keep the motor quiet.

Oh, and solder the wires. Yes the plug destroys stators. If yours was burned, I suggest you also check the rectifier plug. They can do the same.
 

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When I pull/replace engines in a 1200. I deviate from the books a little.

Before I remove the engine, I pull the rear wheel, and then the rear "pumpkin". This allows me to remove the u-joint from the back of the engine. This allows me the space to remove the engine without removing the front timing belt covers.

Re-installing the engine, I reverse it. It's a pain in the backside trying to get bolts aligned and connecting the u-joint all at once. Taking the u-joint out of the equation simplifies it.

The frame will twist slightly as you get all the bolts and mounts tightened. So make sure you have them all started before you start torquing them down.

Make sure the main ground wire is clean. Make sure you put di-electric grease in the fan motor connection. Well.. any connection for that matter. Might as well.


As for your connector.. solder it.. might as well. You might want to hold of on soldering until you've got the bike together and are confident it'll stay together for a while before soldering.

I know a lot of people are tempted to add lights and wizbands and assorted frufru to these bikes back in the day. To me, they looked gaudy.. and as cheap as those lights and stuff were made, I think they contributed to stator burn-out as much as anything.
 

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Hi All,
Since I had to replace the stator connector anyways, I went ahead and soldered the connections in hopes it would remove any opportunity for this to happen again (I had a bad connector). To prevent this from happening to you; use de-electric grease on the stator connector annually (you've been warned)!!!

This was a big project, though if I had to do it again I would now move much faster knowing the process. A few things I took away;
1. when pulling the engine free of the UJ, be sure to slide the UJ back (there's a bunch of room gained by this)
2. Definitely align the cams and pull the right hand pully, and also the pickups on the crank, such that they stay with the frame.
3. Not quite sure where the 7 wire lead's connector is that goes to the bottom of the engine, so I ended up cutting it and then resoldering it. This did not make me happy, though I got over it.
4. You'll most definitely want to order a new stator, rear cover seal, clutch seal, and maybe o-ring seals (4) for the carbs and for the water pump and thermostat. You may not need the o-rings, but better safe than waiting for them on a parts order.
5. When screws are pulled to removed a cover, fairing piece, etc., stick them back in the hole they came from, or place them in little piles of parts so all stays together. Doing this I lost no screws or parts.
6. Getting the engine back in is a pain in the rear; would love to know the magic trick!

Doing the stator replacement was a lot of work, but in the end we saved a ton of money and I got to know our new/used bike better then I would have otherwise. We bought the bike cheap because of this issue, then did the work ourselves, thereby giving us a reliable new toy. :) It now runs great!

Thanks VMSGuy for your help, and Steve for the great videos and instructions.
David
 

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To remove/install the engine, I bought a transmission jack. Combined with removing the u-joint, the engine rolls out the side quite nicely.
 

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I missed Dennis' and VMSGuys posts before I last posted. I concur with both comments.

Getting the UJ out of the way absolutely must save a ton of time, especially if you don't need to remove the front covers or fight to get the UJ plugged in whilst attempting to land the engine.

I do need to get the book, does anyone have a favorite? Clymers? Would be interested in learning about the Honda adjustment.... I'm also going to dig in to find the Rectifier connector to grease it up.

Thanks for the help and ideas fellas! :)
 
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