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I am trying to find out what the max amount of total trailer weight I can pull with my 87 1200 aspencade. I am building my trailer and I am going to keep it as lite as possible but it would really help to have some max weight parameters. I haven't seen anything in writing on this, so I am looking to anyone on this forum for input.
 

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Just another ORF!
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If you are talking about a cargo type trailer, I would be aiming to keep it to around 175lbs, or lighter.



Dusty
 

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I wouldn't worry too much unless you are thinking of something extremely heavy. I put over 250,000 miles on a 1200 with a 200 pound sidecar and two passengers. Many of those miles also entailed pulling a 350 pound camper full of gear.
I sold that bike minus the sidecar, 12 or 13 years ago and it is still on the road today, now approaching 400k.
 

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[align=center]

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[align=center]Welcome diver dean[/align]
 

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Back on a day long ago when I had my first 1100 I did tow a load with the trailer weighing 1000 pounds (may still have the weight slip). I didn't say I was smart.

Taking off and stopping was a pain and I did burn up a set of rear pads by the time I delivered the trailer and payload.

My trailer load was normally 300 pounds (including the trailer) with all my camping gear and what ever else.
 

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Just keep in mind any state has laws as to weight before requiring brakes on the trailer, etc. Not that ours will get that heavy, but it is just a thought.
 

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Just another ORF!
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I thought you were looking for just the totalweight of the trailer, empty. :?

There are many camping trailers being pulled with a trailer GVW of 500lb (or better)

I remember years ago, reading of a chap with a GL1000, pulling his race bike (475lbs)around the country and would be traveling @75+mph pulling it with no problems. :weightlifter:
 

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Monkey with a Football
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My rule of thumb is:

The trailer weight (loaded) should not exceed 2/3 of the bike weight (loaded, including riders). The tongue weight should not exceed 35 lbs but no less than 20 lbs. The trailer should be level and parallel to the ground.
 

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Piled Higher and Deeper
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Its about safety and common sense.. Rudy's 2/3 (66%) rule is a good one... I've seen regulations (one in this country but mostly in others) that limit the GVW of the loaded trailerranging from40% to 100% of the tow vehicle GVW and will sometimes allow/limit to 200% when trailer brakes arepresent.

California is a littlelenient in that it only limits motorcycle trailers to 1500 lb (wow!) and if you add brakes you can go higher.. a quote below

As with other lightweight towing situations, motorcycle trailers are not required to have separate trailer brakes, provided the weight being towed does not exceed 1500 pounds. The California Department of Motor Vehicles suggests that if you do install brakes on a motorcycle trailer, you should ensure that the brakes do not brake harder than the motorcycle brakes. An inequality in braking power can cause the motorcycle to flip backward when the brakes are applied and send it over the trailer. Motorcycle trailer brakes should be adjusted properly at all times.


do you believe that.. flip "backward" when brakes are applied???and "send it over the trailer"??? I am not making that stuff up... some really creative engineers in on that one.... (Maybe there are some trailers attached high on the sissy bars)



Edit: And after a little thinking, I can come up with a scenario... if the trailer load that you are pulling has a HIGH center of gravity, applying brakes will greatly increase the tounge load so that the bike front might get light or even leave the ground.. maybe if you hit the brakes hard enough, it would flip like hitting a spoon or fork on a table... still a bit far fetched..
 

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Still Learning
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sandiegobrass wrote:
Its about safety and common sense.. Rudy's 2/3 (66%) rule is a good one... I've seen regulations (one in this country but mostly in others) that limit the GVW of the loaded trailerranging from40% to 100% of the tow vehicle GVW and will sometimes allow/limit to 200% when trailer brakes arepresent.

California is a littlelenient in that it only limits motorcycle trailers to 1500 lb (wow!) and if you add brakes you can go higher.. a quote below

As with other lightweight towing situations, motorcycle trailers are not required to have separate trailer brakes, provided the weight being towed does not exceed 1500 pounds. The California Department of Motor Vehicles suggests that if you do install brakes on a motorcycle trailer, you should ensure that the brakes do not brake harder than the motorcycle brakes. An inequality in braking power can cause the motorcycle to flip backward when the brakes are applied and send it over the trailer. Motorcycle trailer brakes should be adjusted properly at all times.


do you believe that.. flip "backward" when brakes are applied???and "send it over the trailer"??? I am not making that stuff up... some really creative engineers in on that one.... (Maybe there are some trailers attached high on the sissy bars)



Edit: And after a little thinking, I can come up with a scenario... if the trailer load that you are pulling has a HIGH center of gravity, applying brakes will greatly increase the tounge load so that the bike front might get light or even leave the ground.. maybe if you hit the brakes hard enough, it would flip like hitting a spoon or fork on a table... still a bit far fetched..
You missed the most important part.... send it over the trailer! OH MY!:shock:
can cause the motorcycle to flip backward when the brakes are applied and send it over the trailer.
 

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I'll have to see if I can find any info on the UK's DVLA laws on bike trailers as my (hopefully) new 84 Aspencade I get tomorrow has a towbar and I plan to use it.
 

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spongebob wrote:
I'll have to see if I can find any info on the UK's DVLA laws on bike trailers as my (hopefully) new 84 Aspencade I get tomorrow has a towbar and I plan to use it.
Pretty strict about weight in the UK LINK
 

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Thanks for the link ,at least I'm clear on what I can do now. I like the last point they state just incase I was thinking of towing two trailers with the kids in them, although fair enough they point it out as its the kind of thing I would do for a laugh!:action:
 

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I,ve seen a pic of a Goldwing with a single wheel trailer on it, not sure exactly how good it works but I like the idea of making one as I can get the parts easily, anyone seen or built or used one???
 
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