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Discussion Starter #1
According to UTube the mimimum voltage coming out of the stator is 4.0/4.3.
Does anyone know the max it can put out?

I have traced a no charge condition, on this bike the stator is putting out 6.0. Is that too much? The regulator is dead, I am wondering if the 6.0 may have fried the reg.

Thanks for your help.
 

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2012 GL1800
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Don't know how Utube video was measuring the output of the stator. The actual voltage between any two of the yellow wires is 50 to 60 volts AC. You will have to disconnect the plug to measure the voltage. Just be careful not to short them while testing.
 

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To fully check this you need to start by inspecting the connectors at the stator and the starter relay for burning. Next pull the fake tank and check the regulator connector for burning also. As far as the stator here goes:

"Stator Test

1- First, put the bike on the centerstand. Cut the wires on both sides of the stator connector plug. Strip the insulation aprox. 1/2"-1" back on all three yellow wires. Label each wire A, B, and C.

2- With a multimeter, digital or analog, set to read resistance, check each leg to ground for short's. If no short's are found, (o resistance), you're good to go so far.

3- With the meter set to read resistance, check across each leg. A to B, B to C, then C to A. The reading's should be about 3 ohm's. If you read infinite resistance across any of the legs you have an open winding and the stator is bad. If they read good, keep going.

4- A helper is good to have for this next step. With the battery fully charged and the three yellow wire's separated so they cannot make contact, crank the bike. Have your helper rev the bike to 3000rpm after the bike warm's up.

IMPORTANT!!!

You are checking for AC voltage NOT DC voltage!! Make sure the meter is set to read a minimum of 120vac!!

With the bike at 3000rpm, check leg A to B. Note the voltage.
Then check leg B to C. Note the voltage.
Finaly check leg C to A. Note the voltage.

Compare the three readings. They should be between 50-70vac plus or minus about 5vac per leg. If they read good, chances are you've got a bad regulator."
 

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That sounds like the video by our founder Steve Saunders where he measures DC Voltage on each stator leg.

My opinion is that it tells you more about the health of your rectifier diodes than your stator but I wouldn't trust it for diagnosing either.
 

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What little I know tells me that a 1200's rectifier/regulator does nothing to affect voltages on those three yellow wires, it just rectifies the AC output to DC and regulates the voltage for the bike's use, the dumb stator just puts out what it can as the rotor with magnet in it spins past windings, and it does so as AC.
 

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Agreed, that video is way off base.

Saunders shows a lower voltage (measured on a DC scale!) on one of the legs to ground. That will be caused by the voltage regulator which works by shunting one of the stator legs to ground as needed to maintain correct voltage output. This works by throwing the entire three-phase "Y" circuit out of balance and keeping the resulting rectified output at ~14 volts DC.

So a lower "DC" voltage (!) seen on one leg will always occur regardless if the stator is good or bad unless the regulator is running at "wide-open" output (no shunting).

There is no DC voltage on the stator wires, The meter is getting fooled by the clipped AC waveform - all the sine wave peaks over about 14v Peak are gone due to rectification and system load.
 
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I did that test on a known bad stator and got the same DC volts on all 3 legs adding up to battery voltage so the test is not valid.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for the reply's, I will retest with the plug unhooked. Plenty of slack so separation is easy.
 

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If you still have the plug, is it showing signs of heat?

Also...your profile says "1987 GL1100". Which is correct? It can't be both.
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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Discussion Starter #11
If you still have the plug, is it showing signs of heat?

Also...your profile says "1987 GL1100". Which is correct? It can't be both.
Typo, I am new to the old wings, always have had Harley's. Got a soft spot in my heart for those old machines. So many still going say's a lot for them. It is a 1200.
 
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The stator and rotating magnet is a 3 phase AC generator
The first stage of the regulator is the rectifier. It is a 6 diode bridge design that puts out a relatively smooth DC (much better than a 4 diode bridge on single phase)
The second section of the regulator, is a shunt design devise. It actually shunts the excess power from the generating system to ground. Basically it just puts so much load on the stator that we don't exceed 14.1 VDC or so.

That surprisingly is the only way to get rid of the excess power when you do not have an alternator system with a field coil control.
Very common system on motorcycles, although some are going to a full alternator.


My first reg did not shunt anything, voltage went over 18 volts across the battery, blew a few light bulbs.
My second reg shunted everything to ground, That only ran for enough time for me to see what was happening. I read about 9v across the battery and going down. I stopped that before I burned the stator.
My third reg works perfect, no problems.


I hold a FCC General class license in electronics, so I have done my research in to how these things operate.
 

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Dave-85-LTD;5847873 The second section of the regulator said:
In recent years there are now Aftermarket Rec/Reg units using high-power MOSFET output, a "Series" regulator. Rather than shunting excess power to ground these units pass only the current needed to maintain the correct system voltage. Under light load the voltages on the AC side of the bridge and the unregulated side of the MOSFET can go rather high (careful if poking around the stator connections with a meter probe).

This technology wasn't available when Honda was making the 4 cylinder 'Wing engines, but nowadays is in more common use on modern bikes with permanent-magnet type alternators. Any three-phase MOSFET Rec/Reg unit of sufficient wattage is easily adaptable to a 4 cyl Goldwing. There may even be an aftermarket mfr making a "plug-and-play" unit these days.
 
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