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When my bike sits for more than a few moments the data is lost for the clock and channel presets. Any thoughts on where to start trouble shooting?
 

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The Irish Crew
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You could have one of the faulty LCD displays that seems to plague the GL1500 from around 1996 on. I don't think a fix was ever found for it as the fault lies in the LCD. Best bet is probably a used one off EBay or a breakers near whereverit is you live.
 

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Well I'd be inclined to clean the terminals at the back of the dashfirst before consigning the LCD to the bin.
 

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Check fuses numbered 9 (5A) and 10 (10A). I would also checkthe pins at the harness plug at the radio.Check for dirt or corrosion. Connect a volt meter between the red/yellow wire (+) and the green (-) wire terminals (this is the memory circuit). You should have battery voltage with the ignition ON or Off.

Good Luck.
 

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Also check the memory wire that comes from the back of the radio. I think it's #2 wire, if not it's the yellow wire with the red stripe.
 

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I don't see how it could be the LCD, that's driven from the radio unit but the presets are stored on a chip in the radio unit. One way or another it's not getting it's keep alive voltage for that chip. I don't have a schematic of the radio itself but on the 1993 model fuse 13 in the relay box is the only one that comes directly off the battery and feeds the radio input along with the ignition switch. The keep alive voltage would have to come through that fuse since it's the only source of votage with the key off. The wire goes from the starter relay switch (red lead) to fuse 13 in the relay box and then it's a red/yellow wire to the radio socket. The first thing to check is the fuse, then check for +12V to ground with the key off, on the red/yellow wire on the back of the radio socket. It has to keep +12 on it at all times to keep the memory on.

A simple trick I use when working on my car or the bike to keep memory alive if I have to disconnect the battery is to connect my 12V drill battery in parallel with the battery cables before disconnecting the battery. It will hold the presets and keep the clock going for quite a while. You can do the same thing with a nine volt battery, one of the small rectangular ones. Disconnect the main battery first and then quickly connect the 9V battery. Typically the presets will hold for several seconds without power so you have time to hook up the temporary battery. You can use a diode to in series with the nine volt battery, connect it so the 'arrow' of the diode points to the negative pole of the 9V battery. With a diodeisolated like that you canconnect the 9V across the 12V main battery prior to disconnecting the 12V battery. Just about any silicon diode will to for isolation.

Crude sketch: (I'm a crude guy)

 
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Hey ramsdell :waving:

Your very welcome to the forum and visit often. :clapper:These guys will soon get your problemsorted, :weightlifter:and if they are beat, :crying:i will contact the wingnut for you, :jumper:he is the real expert on these things. :clapper:

:leprechaun: :18red: :leprechaun:
 
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