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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I find that I get a BIG "clunk" ( in the trans? ) when the bike has been idling and warming up with choke, when I put it into first gear .. unless i goose the throttle a few times before putting it into gear.

Since I've figured out how to avoid the "clunk", this isn't a question about what to do .. rather I wonder if there's an explanation as to why this would be the case?

Is there something spinning/freeing when the engine is goosed that doesn't happen with a choke idle?

Curious minds want to know.
 

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2000 GL1500SE
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That is your clutch plates still stuck together. Your goosing the throttle a couple of times with the clutch pulled in helps to break the plates loose from each other. This is normally only necessary when the bike is cold like on the first start of the day.
 

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How long since the clutch Dot4 was changed and fully flushed?
 

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Make sure the choke is off so it is at normal idle. Pull the clutch in a few times before shifting to break the clutch plates apart. And like Newday said, flush the clutch system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
these suggestions are right in line with what i'd suspected. i neglected to make the observation that this is most prone to happen when the bike is cold and i'm eager to get going, and start riding before it's fully warm and idling smooth with no choke. It's hard to resist the urge to ride when the big girl is fired up and ready! .. especially when I was commuting to work on it.

I've changed the clutch fluid regularly since I've owned if for 3+ years.

Thanks for the insights!
 

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Too add to what everyone else says I would add this. The Goldwing uses a wet clutch that runs in the engine oil. When it is cold and sticky the oil tends to stick the clutch plates together. That makes it "clunk" when you put it in gear as they break loose from eachother. I'm not sure it hurts anything but I too do not like the sound of the clunk. My solution is one of two things. If you must warm the engine when it's cold do so. Then turn the engine back off. Shift in to gear and start it in gear. No noise whatsoever then. I don't warm mine up. I just start it and drive low RPM for a while until it warms up. So, what I do is start it in gear and go. If I forget and start in neutral, I turn it off. Put it in gear and start it again. Like I say, I doubt the clunk hurts anything other than your feelings, but I prefer my method for my own peace of mind. As you said it is only a slight inconvenience as it only happens when you start cold.
 

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2000 GL1500SE
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My current bike, a 1500, does not do the "clunk" thing when putting it into gear. I usually just warm it for a couple of minutes until it runs good with the choke set for a slight fast idle (about 1200 rpm) then hold the clutch in for a few seconds before shifting into first and it just snicks right in gear quietly. I have owned 4 other Goldwings, including a 85 LTD I bought new, and they all had a big clunk when shifting into gear the first time it was started for the day. Don't know why this one shifts so good but it does. In fact it shifts better through the gears than any other of my previous Goldwings. I guess all the tolerances fell into place the right way on this one.
 

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My 1500 does not clunk either after returning the choke to a fast idle. But that may be because you seniors advised me right away to clean the slave as well as the master clutch reservoir. There was some gunk in there that could not have been good. Thanks again.
 

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Not looking to get into another thread on oil,but the oil you're useing will make a difference also.
 

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Not looking to get into another thread on oil,but the oil you're useing will make a difference also.


+1 on oil. I switched to Delo 15/40 and bike slides right into gear. Also holding clutch in for a bit before shifting in gear does help.
 

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Ditto to all the above, also hold the front brake when you finally kick her into gear.
 

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Just to be thorough, you might also check the clutch lever grommet. That little bugger can cause some annoying issues. I typed this up in another GoldWing forum:

I have seen this problem on several different Goldwings throughout the different generations. I've attached a picture to help explain what is happening. You can see in the picture the bushing fails to fill its hole, and the arrow points to where the floating linkage poked through the lever itself.
What is happening: The pushrod that actuates the master cylinder, by design, just floats in the space between the cylinder's plunger and a bushing which resides within the actual clutch lever. This pushrod is known for pushing its way through the bushing. Early symptoms include the extra play in the lever before engaging the cylinder's plunger, and the annoying, arbitrary canceling of the cruise control (or complete failure to engage the C.C.) If left to take its own course, the pushrod will eventually push its way completely through the bushing and continue on through the lever itself. Later symptoms include the clutch lever feeling 'loose,' the clutch lever failing to disengage the clutch completely, and worse, the friction point degrading towards the end of the clutch lever travel...that is to say, you pull the lever and you don't feel the clutch working until the lever is pulled almost all the way, releasing the lever has the clutch fully engaged very quickly upon release of the lever. Essentially speaking, when you pull the clutch lever, the first 80% of lever travel just gets the pushrod to engage the plunger, clutch activity is only in the last 20% or so of the lever's travel. Inversely, when you release the lever, the clutch is fully engaged in the first 20% of lever travel. Finally, lol, just before the pushrod finally breaks through the far side of the LEVER (as you can see in the attached photograph,) the pushrod is just too far from fully engaging the clutch, symptoms being the increased difficulty in finding neutral with the engine running, clunking into gear, the bike lurching while stopped, in gear, clutch fully pulled...at this time, you might think about getting a new clutch lever, bushing, and pushrod, about $35 from the dealership, you can reuse the O-ring from the old pushrod.

 
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