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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After rebuilding the carbs on my (5 years sitting in the barn 94 Aspencade SE - I did find some gunked up jets) - it has not solved the issue of dying when turning the throttle up from idle... has surging idle... almost like it is too lean. am back to square one. So the question is:

Since it was running well when parked, should i start with trying to make sure the carbs are synced even though I did not mess with the sync-linkage when disassembled.... or am I in for a more arduous task of testing the components in the spaghetti farm surrounding the motor. plugs were black ( attributed to having to keep it on choke cause it would not idle nice)... after cleaning plugs seem to be back to the normal cocoa brown. Looking for good videos of how to's cuz the service manual gives how to but NOT why... Local shop will not work on it due to age. Seems it is older than most of the techs there.... go figure.

Service performed: new jets, o-rings, seats, float valves/seats, mounting rubber and rebuilt accel pump. Did not mess at all with air pilot screws... book says they are set at the factory. Lastly, where do I hook up the vacuum gauges to perform the sync. Service manual also blank on that. I have checked by feel and also much visual inspection of all vacuum hoses I could see. Bought this for the wife and now I look like a schmuck....... 8>) 37K orig miles. adult ridden, northern Utah and NW Montana.... elevation between 2000 and 6000
 

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First make sure you are getting vacuum to the petcock, second make sure the petcock can hold a vacuum and that it opens and closes, third test the fuel pump.
 

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After rebuilding the carbs on my (5 years sitting in the barn 94 Aspencade SE - I did find some gunked up jets) - it has not solved the issue of dying when turning the throttle up from idle... has surging idle... almost like it is too lean. am back to square one. So the question is:

Since it was running well when parked, should i start with trying to make sure the carbs are synced even though I did not mess with the sync-linkage when disassembled.... or am I in for a more arduous task of testing the components in the spaghetti farm surrounding the motor. plugs were black ( attributed to having to keep it on choke cause it would not idle nice)... after cleaning plugs seem to be back to the normal cocoa brown. Looking for good videos of how to's cuz the service manual gives how to but NOT why... Local shop will not work on it due to age. Seems it is older than most of the techs there.... go figure.

Service performed: new jets, o-rings, seats, float valves/seats, mounting rubber and rebuilt accel pump. Did not mess at all with air pilot screws... book says they are set at the factory. Lastly, where do I hook up the vacuum gauges to perform the sync. Service manual also blank on that. I have checked by feel and also much visual inspection of all vacuum hoses I could see. Bought this for the wife and now I look like a schmuck....... 8>) 37K orig miles. adult ridden, northern Utah and NW Montana.... elevation between 2000 and 6000
Glenn,
Don't feel to bad. Many fail the first shot or two at carburetor repairs. I hate carbs for that reason. An important adjustment when refurbishing carbs is float height. A float height that is set to low will give the symptoms you describe. If you just inverted the carbs and set the height that is at least part of the issue. The needle has a spring in it and you rotate the carbs just far enough so the needle barely touches the seat. It must not compress the spring in the needle.Are you good there.
If you are good there then I have some bad news. The part you did not disassemble is usually the part that needs the most attention.The low speed circuit has the smallest "ports" and plug up tight, When they get plugged with varnish they are a bear to get open again. Seems most have best luck with a single bristle off a wire brush,
If you look at the floor of the throttle opening right at the throttle plate you should see several very small ports. They go in from that point to a tee, Then branch both up and down. The branch that goes up goes to the air bleed and is usually NOT much of an issue. The other branch goes to the low speed jet and passes by the adjusting screws you never removed. Those need to come out to get that circuit opened up.
There is an easy test. When the circuit is cleaned properly and the air jets are screwed in a few turns find a way to spray carb cleaner from the can in to the slow jet under pressure from the can. If it sprays out the air bleed put your finger over that, You should see carb cleaner coming out all of the low speed ports located by the throttle plate floor.

With all this said start with the easy stuff first, Make sure you have a nice clean flow of gas that fills the carbs before doing anything else as JD pointed out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Glenn,
Don't feel to bad. Many fail the first shot or two at carburetor repairs. I hate carbs for that reason. An important adjustment when refurbishing carbs is float height. A float height that is set to low will give the symptoms you describe. If you just inverted the carbs and set the height that is at least part of the issue. The needle has a spring in it and you rotate the carbs just far enough so the needle barely touches the seat. It must not compress the spring in the needle.Are you good there.
If you are good there then I have some bad news. The part you did not disassemble is usually the part that needs the most attention.The low speed circuit has the smallest "ports" and plug up tight, When they get plugged with varnish they are a bear to get open again. Seems most have best luck with a single bristle off a wire brush,
If you look at the floor of the throttle opening right at the throttle plate you should see several very small ports. They go in from that point to a tee, Then branch both up and down. The branch that goes up goes to the air bleed and is usually NOT much of an issue. The other branch goes to the low speed jet and passes by the adjusting screws you never removed. Those need to come out to get that circuit opened up.
There is an easy test. When the circuit is cleaned properly and the air jets are screwed in a few turns find a way to spray carb cleaner from the can in to the slow jet under pressure from the can. If it sprays out the air bleed put your finger over that, You should see carb cleaner coming out all of the low speed ports located by the throttle plate floor.

With all this said start with the easy stuff first, Make sure you have a nice clean flow of gas that fills the carbs before doing anything else as JD pointed out.
After this is all said and done, where do I hook up the Carb Sync gauges to balance the carbs? Are they the ports at the rear of each side of the intake manifolds? Thanks
 

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There is a screw in plug in the center of the right intake and you connect to where the green vacuum line connects to the left side.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Glenn,
Don't feel to bad. Many fail the first shot or two at carburetor repairs. I hate carbs for that reason. An important adjustment when refurbishing carbs is float height. A float height that is set to low will give the symptoms you describe. If you just inverted the carbs and set the height that is at least part of the issue. The needle has a spring in it and you rotate the carbs just far enough so the needle barely touches the seat. It must not compress the spring in the needle.Are you good there.
If you are good there then I have some bad news. The part you did not disassemble is usually the part that needs the most attention.The low speed circuit has the smallest "ports" and plug up tight, When they get plugged with varnish they are a bear to get open again. Seems most have best luck with a single bristle off a wire brush,
If you look at the floor of the throttle opening right at the throttle plate you should see several very small ports. They go in from that point to a tee, Then branch both up and down. The branch that goes up goes to the air bleed and is usually NOT much of an issue. The other branch goes to the low speed jet and passes by the adjusting screws you never removed. Those need to come out to get that circuit opened up.
There is an easy test. When the circuit is cleaned properly and the air jets are screwed in a few turns find a way to spray carb cleaner from the can in to the slow jet under pressure from the can. If it sprays out the air bleed put your finger over that, You should see carb cleaner coming out all of the low speed ports located by the throttle plate floor.

With all this said start with the easy stuff first, Make sure you have a nice clean flow of gas that fills the carbs before doing anything else as JD pointed out.
I know this is an old thread, but I have no time to get back to the old girl..... bot a 97 SE with only 17000miles in the meantime and this one has been chopped to make it look like a MAD-MAX bike. Runs great! I will find some time to take the carbs BACK OFF... (dang it) and see what's what this winter. Thanks all !!!!!!
 
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