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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to change the brake fluid in my front brakes, but the screws are too tight to turn without stripping the heads. What tool do you guys use?
I tried spraying some rust remover around them but it didn't seem to help.
I'm open for suggestions? GREAT BIG screwdriver or what?
Thanks
 

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I want to change the brake fluid in my front brakes, but the screws are too tight to turn without stripping the heads. What tool do you guys use?
I tried spraying some rust remover around them but it didn't seem to help.
I'm open for suggestions? GREAT BIG screwdriver or what?
Thanks
I think you are asking of the Master cyl screws?
I use a hand impact driver to break them loose, others have posted using an automatic center punch to start the screws loose.
Replace the screws with Stainless steel screws from the hardware store, take yours with you to match up.
 

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Ditto what newday777 said. Try an impact driver first. If that doesn't work, you can either try a dremel to cut a flat slot in the head and try a big flat head, or you can try to drill the head and hope that when you get the cap off you can get ahold of the shaft with some vice grips.

Another idea, which I don't how great an idea it is, would be to give the screws a little heat first... but that might cause other damage too.

No matter how you get 'em out though, head down to ace afterwards and grab some stainless screws. I did, and mine come out every time now.
 

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Another technique that I've been using more and more is to Tap on the end of the Screwdriver/Allen-key/etc, while trying to loosen the screw. The Vibration quite commonly enables the screw to break free.

I did this the other day on a drain pan bolt from my truck... took 1/2-hour of light tapping (with simultaneous torque on allen key), then the bolt broke free and it was out.
 

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I'm not positive which 'screws' you are talking about.....bleeder valves/screws? If you can use a wrench, always try to use a 6 point socket/wrench becaseu it will grip it much better than a 12pt.
 

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If you are talking about the Philips screws on the master cylinders, I have had good success removing stubborn screws by using a screw gun (battery powered drill/screwgun) and progressively increasing the amount of clutch engagement on the chuck... In doing this, the tool is effectively acting like an impact driver with increasing torque values... It is imperative to exert a strong downward force on the drill and bit when doing this so you don't strip the screws... This method has worked well for me in several areas including the carburetor shroud on my 1500 whose screws were last installed by the proverbial #800 shop gorilla...

Les
 

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When mine were frozen I used an easy out bit made for screws. I think it cost $3. Drilled into the screw head first, that allowed the bit to get a good bite and out they came.
If you have a very steady hand you could just drill out the screw heads. They are fairly soft. Once the heads are reduced in size enough the reservoir lid while lift off, then you can remove the rest of the scew with fingers or needle nose pliers.

Tip: To avoid this happening again, the new screws should be tightened finger tight or gently snug. Just seat them plus a hair.
 

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A good quality, proper fitting phillips is a big help. If that won't do it, a bit of impact...I have a 3/8 phillips bit...tap on the back a few times with a hammer. Still not, I have a very sharp small chisel...get a bite on the side of the countersunk screw. Or...if I'm in a different mood I'll go with the 'drill the head off' with a sharp 3/16 drill bit. The rest can be easily removed with a pliers when the cover is removed.
 

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...Tip: To avoid this happening again, the new screws should be tightened finger tight or gently snug. Just seat them plus a hair.
+1... It also helps to apply a light coating of grease or oil prior to installation... I just roll them through my oily fingers.
 

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When I'm in that sort of a pinch and the heads HAVE to be drilled off, I have a set of left-handed drill bits I keep just for that purpose. The best thing about them is that the screw usually backs itself out just before the head is completely drilled out. They are VERY handy to keep around. Try not to mix them up with your right hand ones, though. ;)

http://www.harborfreight.com/13-piece-left-hand-drill-bit-set-95146.html

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Is it possible you were not using a JIS screwdriver - it is slightly different than a phillips screwdriver most of us americans have, and may fit the screw heads on these bikes a little better
 
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