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Have to bleed the clutch on a 1990 GL1500, may have to rebuild seals too but not sure what are the steps to do this project. Takes to much time to have it serviced so I look to do the work myself. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Oh - THAT guy...
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Bleed it just like the brakes. Squeeze lever while cracking the bleeder valve.
I think a guy on here also said you can bungee/tape/whatever the handle in the 'squeezed in' position and leave it over night. He said this will allow any air trapped high up out of the master cylinder. I have not tried it, but I have broken loose the banjo bolt right at the lever and bled it before. Messy but effective.
 

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A vacuum bleeder/pump is a really good investment.
BE A MAN, suck on the end of the hose, just like gas siphoning.

LOL, no no, kidding.

Similar thing happened to me last year. Black rubber pieces were coming out with the fluid draining. Without blowing out all the fluid to clean it all out I tried a "rapid fist pop" the clutch lever. The repeated quick jolts to the fluid loosened a lot of stuff. Have not needed to rebuild the slave.... yet. Been 1.5 years and about +20K miles.
:?
 

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Wild Rhino - Canadian
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I just rebuilt my clutch slave, I replaced all the seals, spring and piston
Not all that hard to do. Takes some time though.
Alternator comes out to make it easier
Speed bleeders are nice to have.
you will be surprised to find just how much crap will be stuck inside the guts of it.
Go ahead and rebuild it, you are probably way over due.
I did the same on my brake calipers, and have been replacing hoses as I go along.

Good Luck
 

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I have read on here before about tying the lever down to bleed a hydraulic system. I can not imagine any way that could work. I would think just the opposite might be true. The fluid might migrate out to be replaced by air. When the lever is pulled in there should be no path for fluid to pass from the master in to the system. I would say that if you left the lever in a relaxed position and opened bleeders it could bleed by gravity but not with the lever pulled as this would shut off the flow of fluid.
 

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Hi, if you haven't got a service manual, you can download one at goldwingdocs.com it's the only way to get a handle on what you need to do if you are happy to have a crack at it yourself, for this issue and anything else that will crop up as time goes on.
Cheers,
Peter.
 

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I have read on here before about tying the lever down to bleed a hydraulic system. I can not imagine any way that could work. I would think just the opposite might be true. The fluid might migrate out to be replaced by air. When the lever is pulled in there should be no path for fluid to pass from the master in to the system. I would say that if you left the lever in a relaxed position and opened bleeders it could bleed by gravity but not with the lever pulled as this would shut off the flow of fluid.
It works for removing air bubbles by also turning the bars full lock as air bubbles will travel upwards into the reservoir overnight.
 

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It works for removing air bubbles by also turning the bars full lock as air bubbles will travel upwards into the reservoir overnight.

The part I can't understand is that if the clutch lever is pulled the piston and seal are blocking the flow of brake fluid and air to the reservoir. If air was to rise to the top it could not get in to the master cylinder with the lever pulled. Am I wrong?
 

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The part I can't understand is that if the clutch lever is pulled the piston and seal are blocking the flow of brake fluid and air to the reservoir. If air was to rise to the top it could not get in to the master cylinder with the lever pulled. Am I wrong?
You're quite right.
That's when you ''tickle'' (or burp) the last few drops of air out via the brake/clutch lever.
:readit:
 

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The part I can't understand is that if the clutch lever is pulled the piston and seal are blocking the flow of brake fluid and air to the reservoir. If air was to rise to the top it could not get in to the master cylinder with the lever pulled. Am I wrong?
Yup, air flows to the top and no air in the cylinder or lines. I did that on my bike and it worked perfect. :raspberry:
 

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Wild Rhino - Canadian
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The part I can't understand is that if the clutch lever is pulled the piston and seal are blocking the flow of brake fluid and air to the reservoir. If air was to rise to the top it could not get in to the master cylinder with the lever pulled. Am I wrong?

The trick is that the air travels to the top, with the lever pulled it will be sucked/pushed into the reservoir when the lever is released.
 
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