Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,435 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Need an outside opinion:

91 Aspy. I got clutch problems.
Doesn't catch until I let the lever almost all the way out. Already mity-vac bled it twice this season, the 2nd time didn't really help.

Usually I just bleed itonce a year and that's in March/April after hibernation and it's good all summer(original clutch lines). Also, the slave cylinder is clean and seems okay to me.:baffled: No gunk in the lines or master either, just nice clean dot4.

What's happening right nowis that besides the clutch not engaging until the lever is about 2/3 out, is the lever doesn't seem to be spongy. Also it's a bit of a bear to get from neutral into first if it's warm, not that hard to do when it's cold though. I'm certain there's no air in the lines.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.
 

·
Guru
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
imported post

If it were a cable clutch, you would just adjust the throw. but being hydraulic, I am not sure if you could. At any rate, it sounds like the mechinism is not moving the clutch plates apart enough. Is there any manual adjustment on a hydraulic clutch down at the tranny?

When engaged, do you get good lock up with your clutches or do they slip?
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

On the 1500s I've ridden including mine the clutch doesn't engage until the lever is about 2/3 or 3/4 of the way out. It only requires about 3/4-1" of movement on the lever to disengage the clutch. Your's sounds pretty normal to me.

When idling with the engine in first gear, clutch disengaged,on smooth level ground try rocking your bike forward and back. If you can feel any drag making it much easier to roll forward compared to rolling backward you may have some clutch drag. As for hitting neutral, it's usualy easiest to shift down to first gear and then lift up for neutral. Shifting down into neutral is more difficult. The weight of oil your using can also affect shifting. I have no problem in any of the temps I ride in using DELO 400 15W40.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
529 Posts
imported post

check for clutch slippage, get on a freeway and as you are going up the ramp, accelerate hard, if it slips, you might be due for a clutch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,435 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
imported post

Thanks for the suggestions and the link.

More info:

--Running Delo for a few years now.
--Problem is that it's very hard to get it out of nuetral while warm.
--Underway, the lever seems to catch farther out. And it also seems a bit 'doggish.' I don't know if that would classify as a slipping clutch, but it is noticeable and it's not a fuel problem because it revs just fine.

I've already bled the clutch linesfully through again, and there's no air in this puppy. I'm sure of that.
The slave cylinder is clean and so are the lines and master too.

It snowed for a few seconds today so riding it again in the near future to do the OD slippage ramptest might not be possible. But I'm familiar with what the problems are so I'd like to cover any possiblitieswhile it's hibernating.

What would be the characteristics ofworn clutch and steel plates?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
imported post

What would be the characteristics ofworn clutch and steel plates?
You have friction and steel plates. So long as there is material on the friction plates and they are not glazed, they will function properly. Once the material isworn off, then there is steel to steel contact and thatis were the slipping occurs. It only takes one bad friction disc to slip real bad.

The clutch is locked with the pressure plate, andI do not believe the slave piston floats. So, if the friction disks were to wear evenly and getthinner, I would think that it would push the rod out a little towards the slave cylinder. So, maybe clutch lever operation would be further out, but I would think this would be negligible and not noticeable (false hope).
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

The clutch lever's operating position shouldn't change much with wear on the clutch in a hydraulic system. It works a lot like disk brakes, the brake pedal doesn't go down further with brake pad wear because the amount of travel to release the clutch or actuate the brake doesn't change, the starting point of the travel may change but the hydraulic cylinder will simply feed more fluid into the system compensating for the clutch or brake wear so the lever or pedal operating positions don't change much if at all.

A mechanical clutch works differently because there's no way for the cable to self adjust. Since the cable can't self adjust like a hydraulic system the operating point on the clutch lever will slowly work further and further out as the clutch material wears.

Hydraulic drum brakes work differently too, unlike disk brake pads which don't retract after each use, the drum brake piston is pushed back in each time by springs which retract the drum type shoes. The shoes have to be pushed back in because one of the two shoes is a servo type which tends to pull itself into the drum due to the motion of the drum. Left to itself it would lock up the brake. Luckily the opposing brake shoe is an anti-servo shoe which helps balance the servo shoe.
 

·
Pwhoever
Joined
·
3,182 Posts
imported post

Another possibility that might be causing problems could be the rubber clutch line. They have been known to be unable to hold pressure and will expand when they get older. Just something to look at...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
imported post

As Paul says, as brake pads or clutch discs wear, fluid from the master cylinder resevoir simply gets transferred into the slave cylinder(s). Show me a car with worn brake pads and a full master cylinder resevoir, and I will show you a person who is topping up it up as it goes down. When that low level light comes on, it is telling you that your brake pads are worn and it is time to pay attention-that, and the horrible squeal that should also happen.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
imported post

Disk brakes have calipers that float to compensate for wear.

Drum shoes,has those automatic self adjusters. If those freeze up, and the shoes wear, one would have excessive pedal travel, and one can resort to pumping the foot pedal quickly. But stationary, thelong springs decompression the shoe diameter which basically would require excess travel to the drum.

Wetclutch has has that lifting plateand lifting rod. I can not remember, but I believe there is a spring in the slave piston and this setup would beself adjusting.Due to design, I do notthink excessive clutch wear would be noticeable at the had lever.

You could get a sparemaster clutch cylinder for comparison. I PM'ed and called thegentlemen in the other post about his rebuild.I had rebuilt mine with the "same old seals" twice. Upon inspection, I could not see anything wrong and the lever was "still way out" (Iwas really trying tomake sure the compensator port was open). I bought the rebuild kit anyway thinking that was not my problem, but it did correct my problem on the third try. Apparently, the tolerance is very tight and any swelling, flattening, or relaxingof the seal can cover the compensator port.

You would need to determine if your lever is operating within normal parameters.

I am still interested in your hard neutral. What does a bent shifter fork do, and how do they get bent? Excessive foot pressure?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1 Posts
imported post

I was havingvery similar problems with the clutch on my 1500. I bled the lines several times with no luck. I couldn't seem to find the problem until a friend looked into the reservoir and noticed a tiny piece of dirt. It was just enough to cause the clutch to engage at different points. Sometimes it would appear as though the clutch was slipping. After cleaning the reservoir really good, I haven't had any other problems.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top