Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
88 1500

Quick question, rebuilding clutch slave cly. Besides the slave piston seals, there is one more behind the assembly, my guess is to seal the crank case from the slave cly.
My question is, can this seal be accessed to change once the slave cly is removed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will be getting the parts from Honda, the seal is only a couple bucks, just wanting to know if anyone has changed one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The bike has been sitting for the last ten years, all the hydraulics are in need of a rebuild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
88 1500

Quick question, rebuilding clutch slave cly. Besides the slave piston seals, there is one more behind the assembly, my guess is to seal the crank case from the slave cly.
My question is, can this seal be accessed to change once the slave cly is removed?

Yes, that seal (#15 as follows) can be removed once the slave cylinder is removed. I had to use a mechanics mirror to be able to see into the hole, and a curved pick to pull the old seal out.

Also:
-Replace the crush washers (Item#14) on the hydraulic line to the slave.
-If you buy a rebuild kit (such as K&N), it does not include all the consumable parts (such as Item #12, 15, 17, 18).


OIL SEAL (8X25X8)
91204-MB0-013

ref: The rear seal is also listed here as Item #28


OIL SEAL (28X48X9)
91204-MN5-005
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! That was the info I was looking for. Right now I have the exhaust system removed so I can get to it from the bottom. Will have to use a mirror no dought. I had to get the rear master cly off to rebuild and I have to replace the steel brake line that goes to the front brake. Previous owner cut the line and installed a compression fitting instead of removing the MC in the correct manner.
When I got the bike the clutch did not work, so I blead it to make sure it function correctly. That's been about two weeks, so I drained the system yesterday before disassemble, upon taking off the master cly cap I found no fluid, and no sign of leakage from the weep hole. So it must be going the other way!
The bike itself is in great shape, only 55k on it, still has the OEM front tire on it. All the time just sitting took its toll on it. Worst thing you can do to a bike!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
...Right now I have the exhaust system removed so I can get to it from the bottom...I had to get the rear master cly off to rebuild and I have to replace the steel brake line that goes to the front brake. Previous owner cut the line and installed a compression fitting instead of removing the MC in the correct manner...
If you're that far in, you might consider making a Custom 1-Piece Braided Stainless Steel brake line for the front/left, rather than put the stock one back... The advantages include eliminating one joint in the stock line (adjacent to right side of carb), which will reduce the tendancy to get air in the line.

 

·
Still Learning
Joined
·
13,274 Posts
Thanks! That was the info I was looking for. Right now I have the exhaust system removed so I can get to it from the bottom. Will have to use a mirror no dought. I had to get the rear master cly off to rebuild and I have to replace the steel brake line that goes to the front brake. Previous owner cut the line and installed a compression fitting instead of removing the MC in the correct manner.
When I got the bike the clutch did not work, so I blead it to make sure it function correctly. That's been about two weeks, so I drained the system yesterday before disassemble, upon taking off the master cly cap I found no fluid, and no sign of leakage from the weep hole. So it must be going the other way!
The bike itself is in great shape, only 55k on it, still has the OEM front tire on it. All the time just sitting took its toll on it. Worst thing you can do to a bike!!
The slave cylinder needs to at least be taken apart and cleaned out of the gunk causing the leak, better to get a seal kit or Honda seals. If the fluid is not changed yearly the gunk starts building up and once it starts, only cleaning will get it out, flushing only does not work at that point.
I agree with getting the stainless steel 1 piece line. You'll have better brakes too, no rubber line to stretch and reduce the braking power when you need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your help and advice. The flush was just to make sure the clutch functioned, in will be totally disassembled and OEM parts put back in, same goes for all the master clys and calipers.
I did not know there was a one piece line from the rear master cly to the front brake. This will have to be made custom I take it by reading your post. I bet that is a pretty penny.

Thanks again for all the suggestions and advice!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
...I did not know there was a one piece line from the rear master cly to the front brake. This will have to be made custom I take it by reading your post. I bet that is a pretty penny...
Only about $20 locally for the one line... Or, for only ~$90, I had made an Entire set (3 brake lines; 1 clutch), each a single length of Braided SS.

These guys actually have a kit for the GL1500, although I don't see it listed on their site:
Techa Fit
http://www.techna-fit.com/
[email protected]
1830 W. 208th Street
Torrance, CA 90501
310-212-5051
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19 Posts
If you so desire, you can go ahead and rebuild the clutch too while you are in that deep... It's really not a bad job once the alternator is out of the way... The clutch cover comes off pretty easy and the clutch basket comes out easy as well...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
196 Posts
Yes, that seal (#15 as follows) can be removed once the slave cylinder is removed. I had to use a mechanics mirror to be able to see into the hole, and a curved pick to pull the old seal out.

Also:
-Replace the crush washers (Item#14) on the hydraulic line to the slave.
-If you buy a rebuild kit (such as K&N), it does not include all the consumable parts (such as Item #12, 15, 17, 18).


OIL SEAL (8X25X8)
91204-MB0-013

ref: The rear seal is also listed here as Item #28


OIL SEAL (28X48X9)
91204-MN5-005

Alex. I am taking your advise and trying to replace OIL SEAL (28X48X9.

It seems VERY stuck. Unable to get it out. I've deformed the outer surface around the hole by trying to pry it out ... to the point that i'm sure i have no hope of using the old seal anymore. Can anyone confirm that sometimes this is difficult to remove? Perhaps it can get corroded into place?

As I've started putting some muscle into this and thinking about ways to use a hammer ... i thought i'd ask if there's something hidden behind this that i need to be aware of which might be damaged.

or perhaps i should be doing something other than prying it out?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
196 Posts
looking for guidance on clutch slave oil seal

either something is really screwed up or i'm doing something really wrong.

photo shows a bit of corrosion around clutch slave oil seal that i am trying to remove. my attempts have visibly damaged the seal.

since this is not coming out with a little prying, i've built a tool to catch on the inner edge of the seal-hole .. held firm with vise-grips .. to which i would like to apply some rear directed "pulling" force ( a hammer applied to the vise-grip handle ). so far that's not effective either.

should I ..

1) use my homemade tool and hit it harder?
2) use a different extraction technique?
3) remove the entire clutch cover to beat it out from the other side?
4) arrange for someone to bail me out?

I've got a trip planned in a couple weeks and I'm stressed about this thing sitting in pieces at this point.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
250 Posts
This is what I used. It still was not easy to get it in the correct position but I did get it out with this tool. I bought it at a auto parts store in their tool section. It is made for pulling seals. I looked for the company that made it but I could not find it on the tool. Good luck.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
196 Posts
hey, that's a help

by the looks of THAT tool, pulling this seal is not a trivial matter. it helps to know that I should be expecting a bit of a battle!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
250 Posts
Did a quick search and found this. Looks like Sears sells them also.


Description
Also known as: LIS-56750, LIS56750; 56750Seal Puller For oil and grease seals. Simply insert the tip of the tool behind the oil or grease seal, press and pull. Leverage works for you. Two size tips reach in and fit nearly all seal applications. Skin-packed. Shipping wt. 14 oz. # LIS56750

Looks like it is $10-$16 on Amazon.
 

·
Junior Grue
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
With that tool as with any leverage tool you have to protect the point you're using as a fulcrum.

But yes they are handy for removing stubborn seals.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top