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Surfed net to find goodaftermarket plug with magnet.The following info wasposted at one site offour sites found, in aproduct review there:
Plug has 13mm hex head.Original has17mm hex.Plug metal obviouslyNOT as strong asOEM plug [maybe made in China?]! Many usershave rounded off13 mm hex corners.T'was stated there could also be nasty possiblilty of breaking head off plug, leaving threaded shank stuck inengine case. All plugs found, appear tohave 13mm hex head.
IS there an aftermarket engine oil drain plug, with same dimensions as OEM?
Has anyone ever attempteddrilling a hole in threaded end ofHonda OEMplug,to insert a round magnet? And what adhesive to secure magnet, would withstand the high engine heat and oil?
LASTLY: It was stated here in an older post, that a Suzuki drain plug had exact same
thread size, with a longer threaded end, thus utilizingentire length of engine case internal drain hole threads.
Any advice about what others have used/done on their 1500s regarding this, would bemost appreciated. TTFN.......Old Tom aka papasmurf in NH
 

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It aint rocket science
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I would not worry about snapping the head of a bolt for the drain plug.

Well, if you were using an air wrench.:gunhead:

JD
 

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It should not be installed so tight as to be rounded/stripped upon removal anyway. I use a powerful magnet on the end of my oil filter. Try that and use a stock replacement plug if concerned about plug quality.
 

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Is a magnetic drain plug supposed to trap pieces of metal better than the oil filter? What about aluminum particles?
What are the advantages of a magnetic drain plug?
Tom Bishop
`98 S.E.
 

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papasmurf wrote:
~ Has anyone ever attempteddrilling a hole in threaded end ofHonda OEMplug,to insert a round magnet? And what adhesive to secure magnet, would withstand the high engine heat and oil? ~
Yes, I've done it several times. I've learned that, with the non-ferrous crankcase such as Hondas and most other MCs have, one needn't be too concerned about adhesive. The magnets will hold well in the steel plug without it, if the bore isn't too much larger than the magnet. Use of a drill press or a lathe is best; drilling by hand is not recommended.

If you don't trust that concept, I have also successfully used a two-part epoxy, and being a retired machinist, I have also employed a "light press-fit" on some of my efforts over the years, by reaming the hole to size after pre-drilling.

The biggest challenge with tight fits and adhesives, is the pressure build-up in the bore which prevents the full insertion of the magnets. What has worked best for me is to grind a wee flat along the side of the magnet, to relieve that pressure (also good to grind a small chamfer on the end of the magnet, to prevent galling of the bore.)

The thing is, some folks rightfully question the effectiveness of a magnetic drain plug, since the magnet's exposure to oil volume is so limited. Another idea seemingly well accepted is an arched magnet on the outside of spin-on oil filters, or in my case, a thin cresent-shaped (hard drive) magnet stuck on the metal end-cap of my cartridge-style filter. :waving:
 

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FenderHead wrote
The thing is, some folks rightfully question the effectiveness of a magnetic drain plug, since the magnet's exposure to oil volume is so limited. Another idea seemingly well accepted is an arched magnet on the outside of spin-on oil filters, or in my case, a thin cresent-shaped (hard drive) magnet stuck on the metal end-cap of my cartridge-style filter. :waving:
Most automatic transmissions have a magnet mounted in the pan. And they do catch quite a bit.

JD
 

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The engine case may be aluminum, but the rotating parts and gears themselves are steel. Get as much of the itty stuff as possible helps keep th eoil lubricating instead of cutting. Basically, any additional metal out of the oil is good.
 

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gumbyred , i have used these magnetic plugs in well serviced vehicles and was amazed at what they actually pickup.! Same thing goes for transmission pan magnets as they are always covered with metal powder even though the trans. has a very big filter.??? Go figure ???
 

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Magnetic drain plugs are used in numerous types of aircraft engines. In many of the applications the plugs act as a sensor device to electrically illuminate a "chip detector light" on the instrument panel. This type of magnetic use is not intended to accumulate ferrous particles, but to warn the operator that ferrous particles are being produced by something in the engine. The micron filter is intended to trap "minute" particles..."chips" usually mean that the damage is done...shut it down and salvage what you can. :praying:BTW: you should cut your filter open at each oil change and inspect in between the folds of the paper element. This is where you will find the big aluminum pieces. (hopefully not)

Norm
 

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I use a magnetic drain plug. I also use a stainless steel Micronic Oil Filter to. easy to open and see whats in the filter and oil.
 

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