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I did some research and found that the Napa P72190 fuel pump ($60) runs at 15 GPH and about 2.5-3.5 psi which is closer to the stock 10 GPH. The Delphi and Airtex pumps listed in other posts are running at +/- 20 GPH.

I bought the Napa pump today along with a fuel strainer for the inlet Napa FS0009 ($8).

I followed the instructions on http://www.berrysweb.com/1500_fuel_pump.htm

AZgl1500 EDIT: berrysweb is gone as of 8/28/2012

The same article has been archived at:
https://www.yousendit.com/download/TEhWUXVrQXBmVGFGa2NUQw




The Napa pump comes with a rubber sleeve that fits around the pump and fits into the metal band on the Wing's pump bracket perfectly. It also comes with two connecting wires with fittings on them. I unscrewed the old wires and installed the new ones in their place. The length was perfect. I installed a new piece of 5/16 fuel line and it was done.

I put it back in the tank and after priming it, the bike fired right up! Best $70 I've spent.



EDIT: this pump produces 2.5 psi as measured by a fuel gauge.
 

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+ another one here. The documents are now filed. Thank you.



Regards, Tony.
 

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Ignoramus Primus
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Good work ttiger!
Just curious, is the 15 gph your own measurement or the advertised flow rate. I'm the berrysweb guy and previous experience has shown that sometimes the advertised flow is not always what you get.
 

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Hi Needlenick. I think you did a great job with your barrysweb.com site you deserve a lot of credit for what you did there. Re 1500 fule pump

Thanks a lot.:claps:

Keith
 

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The flow rate was what the spec sheet said. I remember you saying they all tended to run higher.

I am finishing the other stuff on the bike and I'll start riding it to see how it works out.
 

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Update

So far so good.
The bike is running fine. It has the '88 hesitation off-idle that I need to fix, but riding it around it's running well and has plenty of power plus a smooth idle.

I have not checked the fuel pressure with a gauge, but the fact that it's running well tells me the pump is working as it should.
 

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P72190 Fuel Pump from NAPA

PM'd ttiger and followed up with his thoughts on installing the NAPA P72190 fuel pump.


Everything pretty much fell into place without me loosing any screws or cutting my fingers.


Here is a pictorial view of how I put it together.


You will note in the last few photos that I used a piece of 5/16" fuel line (same used for the pump's outlet port) to extend that larger 'S' curved return line to the bottom of the fuel tank and below the assembly frame.


Honda's design ported that line directly inside the fuel strainer. I think that was dumb dumb. Any bubbles generated in that process would cause the OEM fuel pump to cavitate and pushing air into the carbs, not fuel....


Oh well, here is my way and my highway for the conversion. Results? Bike runs very smooth now without acting like it is out of gas.


My opinion is this is the single best and easiest method there is to replace the Honda OEM fuel pump. My total out of pocket cost was $78.00 with tax included.



EDIT: Photobucket deleted all of the pictures :frown2::surprise:

Buttoned everything up, left the fuel hose off of the outlet port and turned the switch key ON.
Nothing!!!! Oh uh? What did I do wrong now?
Hit the Starter Button and fuel sprayed all over the place.

Hmmmmm.. it works!!!


EDIT: 03/25/2019



All of my pictures were on PhotoBucket and I won't pay them $400/year to get them back.

 

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Looks great!

One of the cool things about the Napa pump is the power wires that come with it are the exact length for the Wing. I just removed the screw holding the OE wire and replaced it with the wire that came with the pump. No cutting or splicing required. I did wrap them in the same plastic spiral that was on the OE wire.
 

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Great Info ttiger, I worked at a Auto Parts for quite a few years, always helping bikers like myself with issues like this. Thanks for sharing!!
 

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I have a 1988 Goldwing and have a fuel problem with it that I can't seem to resolve.

After filling up my gas tank, I rode down the road about a mile and it just died on me.

I could get it started, but as soon as I would give it some throttle, it would shut off.

I got it home by letting it idle. I thought it might be bad gas and I pumped all the gas. I went to a different gas station and bought about 2 gallons and put that in, but it still wouldn't start. I took off the fuel line at the filter and turned on the ignition and got no fuel. I checked my shop manual and did the test it said to do. I thought I got it down to a bad fuel pump relay. I installed the new relay, but still nothing.

Sincerely,

Steve
 

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When you turn the key on, you'll only get a second or two of fuel pump. When you hit the starter, do you get fuel?

The bank angle sensor can also cause a no start.

Is the fuel filter clean?
 

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It aint rocket science
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Does anyone know what this pump puts out for psi.?

JD
 

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DriverRider wrote:
Does anyone know what this pump puts out for psi.?

JD
okay fellers, it is not all that bad.

The pump that I installed puts out 2.5 psi as measured by a new pressure gauge that I purchased specifically to find out "how much".







The fuel pump that I bought did not have wires with it.
It did have binding posts with a lock washer, nut, and two high quality nylon insulated crimp terminals. I stripped the wire back far enough to double the wire on itself and then crimped it down hard. Got a nice "gas tight" crimp like it should be. Tug test showed it to be very firm.



I did have one "uh oh". When I did the install the first time I noted that the fuel line had to make a 90 degree curve to attach to the fuel pump. I thought at the time "this isn't going to work, it will collapse".

Well, it was 104* and I was in a hurry to get the "job done". Why is it there is always enough time to do the job again, but never enough to do it right the first time?

The fuel line collapsed the next day, and I had "plenty of time" to do it right by inserting a brass 90* elbow. Works great now.






Not shown in this picture are the black ty-wraps used to secure the wiring around the frame.

Also not shown in this picture is the return line. Left that out on purpose for the picture because it is huge and obstructs the view of everything else.
 

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ttiger wrote:
When you turn the key on, you'll only get a second or two of fuel pump. When you hit the starter, do you get fuel?

The bank angle sensor can also cause a no start.

Is the fuel filter clean?
One note here. I also thought 2 seconds or so on "key on".

On my 98SE that is not so. There is NO voltage applied to the fuel pump at all when the key is switched to ON. A voltmeter verified that, plus I left the fuel line off the outlet to verify no fuel flow. NO fuel to free air at all.

Connected the fuel gauge's fuel line and a touch of the starter button turned the fuel pump on and I was rewarded with a quick splash of fuel and the pressure gauge jumped up to 2.5 psi.

So, on initial starting of the 1500s, if it has been sitting long enough for the fuel to evaporate out of the carbs, it is going to be an extended start up cranking session.

I got to experience that as the bike had died from fuel starvation when the fuel line collapsed. I put the mixture control on full rich and cranked it over. Took about 4 or 5 seconds to start the engine. That's not too bad for a dry carb to running engine.

This NAPA pump does a lot better in that regard compared to the OEM fuel pump after a long layup. The OEM pump would not pump up enough to start the engine until I had quit and rested the battery about 2 or 3 times. I suspect that OEM pump was running very slow. The impeller must have been dragging some?
 

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packard1 wrote:
I have a 1988 Goldwing and have a fuel problem with it that I can't seem to resolve.

After filling up my gas tank, I rode down the road about a mile and it just died on me.

I could get it started, but as soon as I would give it some throttle, it would shut off.

I got it home by letting it idle. I thought it might be bad gas and I pumped all the gas. I went to a different gas station and bought about 2 gallons and put that in, but it still wouldn't start. I took off the fuel line at the filter and turned on the ignition and got no fuel. I checked my shop manual and did the test it said to do. I thought I got it down to a bad fuel pump relay. I installed the new relay, but still nothing.

Sincerely,

Steve
What you just described is exactly what the OEM pump was doing on my bike.

I had been riding along in 104*F weather, stopped for a moment or 5. Got back on the bike and headed for home. 1 mile later, it acted like "vapor lock" and the bike kept going slower and slower. I nursed it along for maybe a mile at 1500 rpm. Then it just quit.

Got off the bike, did a quick voltage check of the battery (12.7 volts) and then while engine cranking (10.8 volts).

Maybe 10 minutes at most the bike was stopped. Pulled the headlight and light fuses to reduce the load "just in case". Hit the starter and it lit off.

Nursed it to the house about 10 miles away and proceeded to change out the fuel pump. What you see posted above here fixed the problem for me.
 
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