Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

41 - 60 of 65 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
476 Posts
I did some research and found that the Napa P72190 fuel pump ($60) runs at 15 GPH and about 2.5-3.5 psi which is closer to the stock 10 GPH. The Delphi and Airtex pumps listed in other posts are running at +/- 20 GPH.

So, not being an engineer or mechanic, what do these numbers mean? In other words, which is better to have, and why? To me, if the rate is too low, I am guessing the engine will starve for fuel. But does it work in reverse- will the 20gph waste fuel or reduce gas mileage? Would it be better to have the pump at 20gph or even higher? What is the explanation?

Same questioning about the psi- what would be ideally perfect and why?

Thanx,

...the idiot. :dumb:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
The extra flow would not hurt the carbs UNLESS as a result the PSI causes damage to the carb parts.

About 3.5 psi is normal, up to 5 psi works fine.

I have read where someone put on a pump that was up to 15ish psi? and it seems to be okay.

3.5 psi will supply more fuel than the engine can burn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
No longer comes with wires.

Looks great!

One of the cool things about the Napa pump is the power wires that come with it are the exact length for the Wing. I just removed the screw holding the OE wire and replaced it with the wire that came with the pump. No cutting or splicing required. I did wrap them in the same plastic spiral that was on the OE wire.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Nobody has mentioned what type of fuel line is being used. According to NAPA their saying we cannot use a standard fuel line submersed in gas as it will corrode the outside of the line. Thoughts?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Pulled the pump. Good bad, right wrong, the OEM fuel hose looked like new so i used it. It was a perfect fit with the NAPA pump. Used the old gasket and no leaks. Could not have gone better. Thanks for all the great info.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17 Posts
Draining gas.

Hi all.

I am needing to change out my fuel pump, however my tank is almost full. Any ideas on how to proceed?

Also, Rockauto.com has the pump (Carter P72190)for $37.79 plus shipping. I'm buying two. The strainer is$4.62.

Thanks.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
With it almost full, you are most likely going to have fuel all over the floor if you open the fuel pump seal on the tank.

I would place a piece of rubber hose on the pump outlet, let it fall into a gas can, apply 12V directly to the B+ terminal and IF the pump will run at all, it can pump the gas out.

once it starts, it might even siphon the rest of it out.

3 gallons of fuel is about 3 inches below the tank opening IIRC.


failing all of that don't work, roll the bike out into loose dirt.
Open the fuel tank opening and just let the gas run over the top.

stick a hose in the tank and siphon out the rest into the gas can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Air Hose??

I've decided to carry a replacement pump with me. I understand the replacement instructions, but I'm curious about the "air hose" that no one seems to be worried about not replacing.

Where does that fitting inside the tank lead to? It's not a tank vent. So where does it go?:raspberry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Just an after action report.
My 97 SE was hesitating on acceleration and recently began trying to quit at
highway speed.
Using this thread, I replaced my fuel pump with the....
Carter pump P72190 this afternoon.
Purchased on Amazon for $41.
Some new fuel line, a couple of clamps and a 90 degree brass elbow cost me another
$25.
I took time to clean up all the electrical connectors, nuts etc.
The rubber gasket looked perfectly fine so I re-used it.
Everything went smooth until I needed to determine which of the leads (cut from the stock pump)
was positive and which was negative. The Carter pump has a + & - for the leads.
(if that was covered earlier I missed it)
So I hooked it all up outside the tank and turned on the key and tried my best to determine +- voltage
but was unsuccessful using normal testing techniques. Yes I did hit the starter.
Each wire appeared to supply current when one probe was on ground. Reverse the probes and the current reversed
on both.
So I just touched the leads to the pump and it appeared to kick in so I hooked it up what way and
put it all back together.

Of course it was not correct so I had to drain the tank again and reverse the leads and everything worked
perfectly. Test ride was perfect and it's running with much quicker throttle response and the hesitation
is gone. I have not had it on the highway yet.
(I had already replaced the coolant temp probe suggested on another thread which corrected a perpetual rich
issue.)
Now, it's getting a petcock rebuild whether it needs it or not.
Slowly but surely I am getting her road ready.
I've already done the fuel and air filters.
I plan on replacing the timing belts, radiator hoses and alternator before spring.
MikeB
97SE
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
wonderful report Mike,

glad your new acquisition is going to be road worthy come spring.

I don't recall if anyone mentioned the wiring for the Carter pump. I do remember that it has separate leads.... IIRC, one was red, the other white?
or maybe it was Black and White.
Black is positive in the car world, and white is negative

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Hey AZ,
There was a black and blue wire to the the stock pump. I know black is "hot" in house wiring so I went with that and it turned out to bewrong. The Pump I got only had screw terminals with a nut so I had to crimp my own connectors onto the wire ends. The old pump was factory wired so it had no markings. I was afraid to put 12 volts to it since I didn't know if I might damage it. In retrospect I should
have tested it in a bucket prior to reinstalling everything. It would have saved me 20 minutes or draining the fuel again and pulling it back out. I have attached some pics or the pump and the coolant temperature probe I replaced just in case it will help someone.
MikeB
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
yeah, reverse voltage on a DC motor will not hurt it, and with the pump sitting in a small container of fuel, you would have known within 2 seconds which wire is for +12

I am always trying to guess what a "black wire" is.... sometimes it is ground which is usually the case on DC systems.

other times, it is the HOT wire in A/C systems... which I always thought was a stupid thing to do... why in the hell didn't NEMA fix that back in the dark ages???

In my house, the electric is all black, every single strand if it is not part of a piece of Romex. the electrician was an idiot... he pulled in a circuit, hooked it up, and moved on.... to hell with documentation or colored tape.

I have spent days of tracing out the wiring in my house, and using a Tapewriter to label the switches. and I still have more than half of them to go.

24 circuits, all black, no labels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
This replacement pump appears to be the answer. I am wondering what is the most miles someone has put on since changing to the carter pump? I see the thread is a bit old but hopefully someone will see and reply as my pump is no longer pumping gas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
For starters, I just want to thank everyone for their suggestions/issues on replacing the fuel pump. First issue I had was that I couldn't find the replacement fuel pump suggested, however, I found one from O'Reilly Auto Parts with the same specs. It's the Import Direct E16061 (http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/IDF0/E16061.oap?ck=Search_e16061_-1_2318&keyword=e16061), and the strainer I used is a Delphi S13011(total cost $61.98 + tax). The pump didn't have clearly marked terminals, so I did a "bucket test" to determine polarity. (BTW, in DC voltage, black is ground(-), colors are positive(+)). While I had the bracket out, I decided to test the fuel level sensor(it was bad as well). Used the 99 Civic brake lever sensor for that too(about $3 at salvage yard)! Looks like I will get the fuel light at around 1.25 gallons. I've only run one tank through (but not a continuous run), though that will change shortly.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
while you are good at getting the fuel pump out of the tank,

why not calibrate the Fuel Gauge?

empty the tank of fuel, then fill it with exactly 3.0 gallons of fuel...
turn the key on and wait for the gauge to settle, and it will NOT be at 1/2 tank

reach inside the tank with you right hand to the upper left portion of the tank,
grasp the float arm and raise or lower it to make the gauge move to the 1/2 tank mark.

bend the float arm so that it stays there when you release the float.

you will be glad you did, because the LAST 3 gallons of fuel will be very easy to view.
When the tank is empty, the gauge will be at the very bottom red line.

the Low Fuel light should come on when the gauge is at the 1/8 tank level or there abouts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Thanks for the tip! Funny thing about my gauge, with a full tank, it's pegged to full, but when it has just one gallon(measured amount while on the center stand), it's well into the red zone. So, there must be another way to calibrate the float sensor. I added about a 1/4 gallon, and the fuel light went off. I think when I've run this tank out, I'll try to adjust the float one way or another. While I don't like the thought of bending the arm, it may be the only way I can fix it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
57,435 Posts
The float is attached to a variable resistor. The fuel tank is shaped a lot like a pear.
You can't hurt anything by bending the float arm. And it don't take very much of a bend.
The low fuel sensor is fixed at the 1 gallon level, you can't move it.
 
41 - 60 of 65 Posts
Top