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I rebuilt the carbs on my 89 GL1500 and adjusted and synced the carbs to what I thought was good. But after riding 100 miles it got worse. So I took the left fan out and went thru the process again. Had a tech connected and at half turn intervals watched the tach increase by about 50 rpm's and once I reached a point where it would start to drop then I I turned the pilot screws back in a half turn as the manual stated nd then one full trn back out. Then adjusted the idle and went to the right side and with 2 vacuum gauges connected I was able to sync the carbs to a setting that is equal on each side.

The hesitation was about 80% better but not perfect. I never had the hesitation that other with the 88's and the 89's experienced.

The question I have in all this is I unplugged the air temp unit mounted on the fairing mount. And the hesitation is virtually gone now completely.

What if any other problems will it have if I leave it disconnected. The later wings do not have this unit on them or at least there is not a mounting place for it on the fairing mounting bracket.
 

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If the spark plugs are the right color now, I say leave the sensor off. Or you could get another one, the one you took off could be gone bad.
 

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Yes plugs look fine. They are not looking like they are running rich or anything
 

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What does the Air Temp Unit do?

I have friend's bike with same problem... figured, like you, that we need to adjust the idle mixture... but if it's just the Air Temp Sensor being bad, then that's easier to deal with.
 

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Alot easier to deal with ... I am not exactly sure how it factors into the slow jeting of the carbs but I am still searching that out.. But it did solve my problem



But I am curious if it will in fact impact my fuel mileage
 

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The Ta sensor is on the front fairing stay to the right side should be able to see it looking forward in the right side of the fork tunnel (Air temp sensor - used in timing calculations -- higher resistance would be colder air, which would retard idle timing -- better low-rpm performance)

You can drop an adjustible pot inline with the sensor to lie to the bike's ECU and dial-up whatevere temp value you want ...
 

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I unplug mine and it solved the hesitation problem, but I lost about 5 mile per gallon. I plugged it back in! I would like to know if anyone has installed a new sensor and solved the problem that way.
 

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I just checked the manual for the 95 1500SE and it says the air temp sensor is attached to the cowl stay. The diagram is at http://www.bikebandit.com/houseofmo...gl1500a-gold-wing-aspencade/o/m9674#sch418460
My bike just started doing the same thing just recently and I have noticed a decrease in fuel mileage recently too.
My Clymer's manual says that in 1994 they changed the name of the sensor to IAT. My manual goes through a good explanation of where the sensor is and how to test it. Basically it is in the top, front, right hand corner of the air cleaner cover. at 68 deg it should measure 2-3K ohms and it should decrease to 200 - 400 ohms at 176 deg Fahrenheit.
It looks like an easy test - I will try it tomorrow.
 

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I checked the sensor (at one point only ~70 deg F) and had 2.2 K ohms which is what I expected.
While doing other maintenance I pulled all the plugs and while they looked good they were gaped too wide (~.038).
While I had the plugs out I did a compression check and five cylinders were 170 - 180 pounds and one cylinder (#3) was at 60 pounds.
I thought I was looking at an engine rebuild but until then I put 6 ounces of sea foam in the oil and went for a ride (almost 200 miles).
By the time I got home my RPMs had gone up almost 300 RPM (I had adjusted the RPMs earlier to bring them back up to specs.) and the engine was running smooth again:jumper:.
This is too good to be true so today I want to redo my compression check (off with the tupperware!!).
 

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I just finished the compression check and all cylinders were 195 +/_ 2 psi. :realshocked:
Not bad for almost 128K miles.
Now to check the timing (because I have never checked it!)
Almost seems like a waist of time!!!!

P.S. If you have a spark plug socket that will not hold the plug just take a sharp tool and pull back the rubber sleeve inside the socket and put a couple of 1 inch pieces of toothpick between the rubber and the outer wall (more if it is still too loose). This will tighten the grip of the socket and the plugs will stay in place.
 
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