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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a 90 gl1500. when i got it it had a pull to the left. I knew it needed tires. Bought new tires, new wheel bearings, checked the swing arm and tree bearings. as soon as i put on the new tires i noticed a wobble. I checked air pressures and had the front at 34 the rear at 38 ,lbs. after increasing the tire pressure to 38 front and 42 rear the wobble is better till i get to 60mph. Now it's scary. I have a super brace installed as well. I did notice that the fork bushings have some play in them. Could this be the wobble. I would love to find out what it is. Don't want to sell it but not comfortable riding something that dosn't feel stable.
 

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It is a tire out of balance or out of round. Even with loose forks it shouldn't wobble if the tire is true. Check that the tires are seated all the way around the rim, there should be a line on the tire that is even all the way around.
 

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I don't imagine the pull to the left was caused by tires,Po may have hit something and tweeked the bike. Or crashed it and did the cosmetics and sold it. Get it checked for an alignment problem.
wilf
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The tires are seated correctly, balanced and have been checked for out of round. As for the pull to the left- That was caused from uneven wear due to the crown in the road. As for alignment i wonder if that could be checked with a plumb bob??
 

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Still Learning
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Has the bike been in an accident?
Have you inspected the frame steering neck for stress cracks?

Has the triple tree been removed and inspected for bends in the spindle?

There was a post a year or two ago of someone buying a rebuilt bike that had gone into a ditch, the Guy who bought it and did the "repairs " didn't pull the triple tree. Well the new owner finally did as the steerimg was a bit jerky and found the spindle shaft a pretzel.
 

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Check your steering head bearing preload as well... I developed a slight deceleration wobble some time ago on my previous 1500 (93 Aspy) and after checking the steering head bearings with a spring gauge found that they were way too loose... Might be worth a check...

Les
 

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1993 gl1500, 1976 gl1000
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The tires are seated correctly, balanced and have been checked for out of round. As for the pull to the left- That was caused from uneven wear due to the crown in the road. As for alignment i wonder if that could be checked with a plumb bob??
Pull to the left is not caused by wear due to the crown in the road. Alignment check. Don't overlook the rear tire as a possible cause of your wobble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I replaced both tires at the same time as well as the bearings. The pull to the left is now gone. May not seem right but, new tires cured it. the uneven tire wear ( more on the than the right sitting on the bike) surely caused it to pull left. Purhaps the other owner was a race car driver and enjoyed turning left, who knows. what should the head torque be?
 

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My thoughts are your new tires may have stopped the pull to the left but did not cure the problem. Now your bike pulls to the left and the right hence the wobble. Goldwings are not know for highspeed wobble to heavy. they are know for a low speed decel wobble.
Wilf
 

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just picked up a 93 GL1500. Was only able to test drive a short bit. On longer rides after buying it, noticed a pull to the left. Thought it was the tire, then saw a slight fork bend. Pulled the forks, saw the tweaked trees.

Long story short, new trees and forks from e-bay, new all balls bearings, lots of reading on here, and a few hours of my time, and she is smooth as glass.

Not saying the tires weren't doing it, just make sure its not something bigger. I would dig into the front end, as the steering bearing replacements are much better and a good upgrade anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
hello everyone. per my post from a while ago. I am now rebuilding my front forks. I checked the play (wobble ) of each fork before the rebuild and just finished the first fork. I still have play in the bushings even with new ones. Is this normal. Has anyone found the same isse.
 

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hello everyone. per my post from a while ago. I am now rebuilding my front forks. I checked the play (wobble ) of each fork before the rebuild and just finished the first fork. I still have play in the bushings even with new ones. Is this normal. Has anyone found the same isse.
How much play in the fork ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I remember reading something a while ago about putting a dimple in the bushing to tighten them up. Can't remember how nor can I find it again.
 

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I would check the sliders (inside tube) for trueness. take it apart and place it on a known flat surface, a cast iron table saw top.
I had a set of bent forks and triple tree that I had to replace, one fork was visibly bent, the other you had to look close to see it, and the triple tree had to come out to see just how bad it was.
If you get to the point of checking load on the head bearing, and have the forks off, pulling the triple tree is not much more.
If you need forks and or a triple tree, I a set that needs a home.
I replaced both the outside and inside tubes, rebuilt them prior to installation.
Good Luck
 

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Hi Jammer. You should be able to detect NO movement in the lower fork tubes by pulling forward and back and from side to side. If you replaced the bushings and you still can feel movement then the lower fork tubes or sliders as some people call them are worn inside. take them apart and clean them real good. Use a bright lite and look down the tube and you will see a shinny area in the lower part of the tube where the bushing rides. You could try some thin brass shim stock under the new bushings to tighten them up a bit but if you do this you must make sure when it's assembled it slides freely through it's complete travel. I have had worn sliders on a couple of the wings I have had. How many miles does your wing have on it ? Most people do not change there fork oil often enough . Think about all the work that fork is doing and how many times it bounces up and down during a ride and how hot it gets. On my 1500 I change fork oil every other oil change. I change engine oil every 6000 to 8000 miles. My 1500 had worn sliders when I bought it and I found a complete front end on e-bay for 50 bucks with only 40,000 miles on it. Hope this helps some.

Cyclepath

hello everyone. per my post from a while ago. I am now rebuilding my front forks. I checked the play (wobble ) of each fork before the rebuild and just finished the first fork. I still have play in the bushings even with new ones. Is this normal. Has anyone found the same isse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm at 64,000 and the oil I took out was black. I seem to have play at any location of the tube. The top bushing did not go in easy. is this normal for the top to go in hard?? I put atf in the one that is done and also I have one spring inside another and when I hat bumps I can hear the springs hitting each other. would you say they are stock springs??
 
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