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I recently installed HID's on my bike and really love them. I bought a delay relay for it (10 sec. delay) and now I just need to wire it in. I thought I had a grasp of what I am supposed to do but googling it just confused me. I'm guessing relays are very flexible. I've never installed one before.

Anyways I came across this photo by wingsconsin and it seemed similar to what I'm trying to do only I'm not using a switch to control the circuits. I just want the delay for the HID's. Could use some help though to make sure I understand what I'm supposed to do. Here is the photo I found from wingsconsin.



I'd like to install this relay so I alter the factory harness as little as possible so everything can be put back to original if desired. I am figuring the way to do the least altering is tap in after the oem connector to the headlight harness. Does this make sense?

a) So should I cut the factory headlight harness then connect that positive lead (from the ignition switch side) to #30?
b) And on the headlight harness connect that positive lead (that goes to the HIDs) to the #87?
c) And then can I connect the same positive lead to #86 as I connected to #30? It just needs switched power right?
d) And then finally connect #85 to a switched ground? Can I tap into the factory harness to the same ground that goes to the headlights?
e) or am I completely off?

p.s. what is the 87A circuit for?
 

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I recently installed HID's on my bike and really love them. I bought a delay relay for it (10 sec. delay) and now I just need to wire it in. I thought I had a grasp of what I am supposed to do but googling it just confused me. I'm guessing relays are very flexible. I've never installed one before.

Anyways I came across this photo by wingsconsin and it seemed similar to what I'm trying to do only I'm not using a switch to control the circuits. I just want the delay for the HID's. Could use some help though to make sure I understand what I'm supposed to do. Here is the photo I found from wingsconsin.



I'd like to install this relay so I alter the factory harness as little as possible so everything can be put back to original if desired. I am figuring the way to do the least altering is tap in after the oem connector to the headlight harness. Does this make sense?

a) So should I cut the factory headlight harness then connect that positive lead (from the ignition switch side) to #30?
I would add a fuse at the battery and run a dedicated line to 30..
b) And on the headlight harness connect that positive lead (that goes to the HIDs) to the #87?
87 is the terminal that would go from the relay to the headlights to light them. It is a normally open terminal. 87A is the same But it is normally closed. you would use 87 the normally open.
c) And then can I connect the same positive lead to #86 as I connected to #30? It just needs switched power right?
See below
d) And then finally connect #85 to a switched ground? Can I tap into the factory harness to the same ground that goes to the headlights?
See below
e) or am I completely off?

p.s. what is the 87A circuit for?
Ok, to be more generic I would say this. 85 and 86 trigger the relay. That is turn it off and on only. Either terminal 85 or 86 can be 12 volts but the other must be a ground of course. The load part of the relay travels from 30 to 87A when the relay is off, (NC) or 87 when the relay is turned on. (NO)

I would wire as follows. I would find a wire that is hot with the headlight on. Beware it must be hot in bright or dim and could be a challenge. After that it is easy. Run that wire to 85 or 86. Ground the other to the frame. Now when you turn your lights on the bike the relay turns on so we have to get power to the lights. Bring a fused wire from the battery to 30. Now run a wire from 87 to your fancy new lights. So the sequence of events is that when 12 volts is applied between 85 and 86 that turns in the relay. (think of it as a switch) NOW the switch is closed and the power will flow from the battery to 30. Through the normally open #87 (now closed) terminal and off to your lights. Easy peasy. Hope this helps.

Edit: You got it. Perfect..... You are too fast!! :bow: I might have a question as to how much current the lights draw. Will the fuse stand the load to 30? At worst run a fused wire from a hot (like the battery) to 30 and save the hassle of fuses or worse yet melted wires. Also, is there a switched ground in the bikes circuit? If you have a constant ground (85) and a constant 12 volts (86) it will never shut off. It might be fine as printed. Yours to investigate.
 

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I would pick up the relay signal at the alternator. If it isn't charging then the HID is not active. Would solve the problem for guys with the plasma lights too, once they fire if there is a significant voltage drop(starter motor) they will not restart.
 

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Edit: You got it. Perfect..... You are too fast!! :bow: I might have a question as to how much current the lights draw. Will the fuse stand the load to 30? At worst run a fused wire from a hot (like the battery) to 30 and save the hassle of fuses or worse yet melted wires. Also, is there a switched ground in the bikes circuit? If you have a constant ground (85) and a constant 12 volts (86) it will never shut off. It might be fine as printed. Yours to investigate.
Thanks. I think the HID's are safe. They were 35watts and supposed to draw less than stock oem halogens. They are connected to the factory wire harness and appear to be working ok.

Just a question. Why would it be a bad idea to wire this into the ground of the factory harness? Or can someone suggest a nice grounding spot up front?
 

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Relay/Wiring

Happytrails...

Thanks. I think the HID's are safe. They were 35watts and supposed to draw less than stock oem halogens. They are connected to the factory wire harness and appear to be working ok.

Just a question. Why would it be a bad idea to wire this into the ground of the factory harness?

I never like removing insulation and splicing into the original wiring, it just creates one more area for corrosion, build up of resistance etc. to occur. One more unnecessary "possible" trouble spot.......!


Or can someone suggest a nice grounding spot up front?
There is an OEM ground point on the radiator (near the thermostatic fan motor switch).
 

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I didn't mean not to use the existing ground.It is not an issue, I just didn't realize how much knowledge you had and wanted to be sure you understood there had to be a switch somewhere. In your diagram it was just shown as plus and neg. Of course any place you get in the factory harness do a good job but I'm sure you will do that.

Also I have a question. Can you tell me what the name of the product is that you made the electric's diagram? Very nice.
 

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I didn't mean not to use the existing ground.It is not an issue, I just didn't realize how much knowledge you had and wanted to be sure you understood there had to be a switch somewhere. In your diagram it was just shown as plus and neg. Of course any place you get in the factory harness do a good job but I'm sure you will do that.

Also I have a question. Can you tell me what the name of the product is that you made the electric's diagram? Very nice.
Im not very good electrical but im trying to learn. Sometimes its confusing.

Many thanks to you all for understanding and help thru the rough spots.

I used Autocad for that diagram. I use it everyday so it had become second nature for me. If anybody ever wants anything drawn in CAD just let me know. I can whip up a drawing or template from a sketch or maybe a description.
 

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Just 1 last question. I'm stopping to pick up supplies tonite (either wallyworld or advanced auto). What gauge wire do I need to tie into the headlight harness wiring? 14ga? tia!
 

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At 30 amps #14 is very adequate. Look at the attached chart. I bet the bike has #16 or #18 but just a guess.
 

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I would pick up the relay signal at the alternator. If it isn't charging then the HID is not active. Would solve the problem for guys with the plasma lights too, once they fire if there is a significant voltage drop(starter motor) they will not restart.
We bought two of the timed relays. One for my Goldwing & one for my Brothers. But we have little wiring knowledge. And with me being color blind makes the task a touch more difficult. Could someone please walk us through the wiring of the timed relay connections to the HID lights & alternator so the lights only come on once the bike is started?
Thanks in advance.
Dave in Colorado..
 

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I would pick up the relay signal at the alternator. If it isn't charging then the HID is not active. Would solve the problem for guys with the plasma lights too, once they fire if there is a significant voltage drop(starter motor) they will not restart.
If you think about it,
This is a not good point for the 12V source for the HID ballast.

The output lead of an alternator goes direct to the battery all the time, key on, or key off. It only outputs power when the engine is running, that is true, but the lead itself always has battery power on it. ( reverse blocking diodes are inside the alternator )

On my bike, DaveO430's bike, and Lopeha's bike, Dave used the oil pressure switch signal to ground as the switching point. The delay relay is "hot" all the time, you just interrupt the Ground Signal instead.

The idea is, you do not want the ballast to fire up unless the engine is running.

Another source for the Delay Relay would be the Accessory switch block. That is only on IF the key switch is turned on. But, this has a problem if you don't actually try to start the bike.... the HID will be turned on at the time out period anyway, regardless of whether the engine is running.

IMO, as an electronics background person of 50+ years, you want a switching point that is operated by Oil Pressure.

This negates all of the bad places to hookup the power. You get the 12V + direct from the battery thru a fused wire ( close to battery ).

The switch lead is the ground signal from the oil pressure switch.

You definitely do NOT want to source the +12V power lead from the OEM headlight switch, as that is pulsed with the START button....
 

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If you think about it,
This is a not good point for the 12V source for the HID ballast.

The output lead of an alternator goes direct to the battery all the time, key on, or key off. It only outputs power when the engine is running, that is true, but the lead itself always has battery power on it. ( reverse blocking diodes are inside the alternator )

On my bike, DaveO430's bike, and Lopeha's bike, Dave used the oil pressure switch signal to ground as the switching point. The delay relay is "hot" all the time, you just interrupt the Ground Signal instead.

The idea is, you do not want the ballast to fire up unless the engine is running.

Another source for the Delay Relay would be the Accessory switch block. That is only on IF the key switch is turned on. But, this has a problem if you don't actually try to start the bike.... the HID will be turned on at the time out period anyway, regardless of whether the engine is running.

IMO, as an electronics background person of 50+ years, you want a switching point that is operated by Oil Pressure.

This negates all of the bad places to hookup the power. You get the 12V + direct from the battery thru a fused wire ( close to battery ).

The switch lead is the ground signal from the oil pressure switch.

You definitely do NOT want to source the +12V power lead from the OEM headlight switch, as that is pulsed with the START button....
Thanks for your response and expertise on this. Could you please tell me exactly how to and where to make the connections on the timed relay and the GL1500 for it to work off the oil pressure switch.
Thanks again.

This is the timed relay we are using.

http://www.retro-solutions.net/product-info.php?HID_Time_Delay_Relay-pid602.html
 

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What Dave did, was to use a separate relay that is connected from 12V+ on the hot side,
and to the Oil Pressure switch on the ground side. This was on our 1800s, so I do not have direct info for the 1500s.

However, both use an oil pressure switch in the same manner. The Oil Pressure switch is already grounded by virtue of being installed in the engine block. The single wire is from the contact that is closed to ground.

The relay controlled by the oil pressure switch turns on the power to the HID ballasts on our bikes.

This totally negates the need for a Time Delay Relay, as the oil pressure is "your time delay feature". ( I can leave my key turned ON all day, but the HIDs will not turn on until the engine starts.)

This gives an added benefit IMO, the Low Beam HID is always ON if the engine is running.
So, when I switch on the High Beams they are both ON.... this really wakes up the dum dum dolts in front of you.

Over the last 5,000 miles there has not been one driver attempt to pull out in front of me at an intersection, nor has there been any drivers attempt to make a left turn in front of me from an oncoming situation. And yes, I have witnessed many such scenarios where they started to do the Left Turn and suddenly stopped, and also on one occasion, I saw a car pull out from a Weed Infested intersection and then suddenly the front bumper dipped way down.

I attribute all of the above to the much increased Light Visibility of the HID lights along with me also running the High Beams ON all the time.

I have never had anyone complain to me, flashing light? nope,
a LEO? nope

So, IMO, the HIDs are a valuable asset to our Stay Alive Arsenal.

Now, with the newer LED headlights coming on.... oh yes, very nice. But they weren't available when Dave and I did our modifications.
 

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What Dave did, was to use a separate relay that is connected from 12V+ on the hot side,
and to the Oil Pressure switch on the ground side. This was on our 1800s, so I do not have direct info for the 1500s.

However, both use an oil pressure switch in the same manner. The Oil Pressure switch is already grounded by virtue of being installed in the engine block. The single wire is from the contact that is closed to ground.

The relay controlled by the oil pressure switch turns on the power to the HID ballasts on our bikes.

This totally negates the need for a Time Delay Relay, as the oil pressure is "your time delay feature". ( I can leave my key turned ON all day, but the HIDs will not turn on until the engine starts.)
An 1800 is a whole different thing, it has a relay already activated by the oil pressure switch, the 1500 does not. On an 1800 all you have to do is connect the coil of the low beam relay to the output of the headlight adjust relay and it's done. On a 1500 you almost have to add 2 relays to get the same job done.
 

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An 1800 is a whole different thing, it has a relay already activated by the oil pressure switch, the 1500 does not. On an 1800 all you have to do is connect the coil of the low beam relay to the output of the headlight adjust relay and it's done. On a 1500 you almost have to add 2 relays to get the same job done.
Thanks for your input.

Could you please tell me how to wire the HID relays to the oil pressure switch for a GL1500?
 

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This should do it, unless I missed something. Your kit should have the wire coming from the battery + so all you have to do is wire the relays into it. I may have to translate the writing. :grin3:
 

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