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Discussion Starter #1
Well, a nail requires a slightly premature rear tire replacement. I have the tires. Decided to go with the OEM K177. I had good luck, good wear, and minimal scalloping with the nearly new ones that came on the bike in 2012. They are at about 13K miles. Anyway, the bags are off, the mufflers are loose, and ready to drop the wheel.

My questions are several:
1) I have looked at a couple of how-to's, and it would appear that the rear wheel is removable with the bike only standing on the center stand. I'm looking at it, and I don't see the clearance to get that puppy out of there. There is only 2 inches, at best, under the rear tire. I see in one how-to that it appears the tire is being supported with 2-2x4's. That's more space than I have. I do have an aluminum motorcycle jack, that is brand new. I just don't trust it due to front-to-rear weight distribution. That may be correctable. The question is, has anyone removed the rear wheel with that small a clearance using just the center stand ? The new tire will be slightly taller to complicate things.

2) Gonna change the rear brake pads at the same time. I don't have them yet. So far the local shops only have the EBC pads. Any good ? Trying to get this done in the next 2 days, so no time to order the OEM's. Or, are the EBC's of a questionable enough quality that I should just order the OEM's and delay my schedule ?

3) Going to change the air shock fluid. Is ATF the best thing to use, or good enough, or should it be fork oil ? 140ml as I read it, or 4.7 oz. Also, where is the desiccant located in the pump system ? Was going to dry it out, if needed. Also, changing the shock boot with a Monroe SA1997 boot. Anyone else had luck with that boot on the GW air shock ?

4) Already planning on Moly 60 on the drive splines. I also already have a set of the 5 rubber cushions for the wheel drive pins. Are they a high wear item, like the alternator rubbers ? Or, if they look good, just leave the old ones in ?

Any other thoughts or tips ?
Thanks in advance for any replies..... :bow:
 

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I usually remove the tag mount and the rear fender/panel then i roll the tire out the back. There is also a brace behind the rear fender/panel that has to be removed.
 

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The wheel will come off on center stand if you also remove the final drive at the same time.

I use EBC sintered pads, with the HH after the number. Just be sure to clean the pistons before you push them in. Also clean and lube the slider pins with brake grease.

ATF is @ 7 wt oil which is what comes in the shock. 10 wt fork oil is good too.
 

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I've used the luggage pack lift/pivot method the last two times.

There's no easy way to do it, compared to normal motorcycles.
 

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Pull the license plate frame and rear fender for tire removal.

I wouldn't waste my time with the cheapie $22 EBC pads, go with Stu's suggestion for the upgraded pad or OEM. Replace torn caliper pin boots and use caliper slide grease on pins.

ATF fine for shock.

Whats the mileage? Unless the drive cushions fall out by themselves they are likely good, they are not a high wear item.

Where the short hooked hose is on compressor is where the beads are I think.
 

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I have read of a rust issue on a recessed weld of the swingarm, inner side

When rear wheel is removed, look in there, clean well and spray some Flex Seal or similar product to coat the surface = seal the weld

Those who ride in inclement weather or wash the bike with a hose get water in that area
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, all.
Got the wheel off by removing the tag and rear fender area. Perfect. Thanks for the heads up, guys.

Had to go with EBC HH pads, as that is all I could find in the area on short notice. They will likely be better than the organics that came off, totally worn out. Got the caliper lube, cleaned the caliper, ready to go.

Bike has 49K miles, and 2 of the rubber drive cushions were cracked. All were loose to one degree or another. I replaced them all with new.

Still need to take out the air shock for an oil change, and maybe the air pump. We'll see. Got a Monroe SA1997 shock boot that looks like a great replacement fit.

Will take a look at the swingarm. This bike is in pristine shape, and doesn't look like it has ever seen a salty road, and not much rain either, as it's not a daily rider. I've done 10K miles in 2 years of weekends and short trips.

And....of course, one question. The left shock lower bolt was very hard to unscrew. The threads appear fine, so I don't think it is a crossthread issue. I could barely back the bolt out far enough to remove the caliper bracket. I have brought the pressure on the air shock to 0psi. So the question, is the left spring shock still 'under pressure' when the swingarm is at its farthest travel ? Is that what is putting pressure on the lower shock bolt making it so hard to turn/remove ? Or, is there some other common reason for that bolt to be so difficult ? It appears that the only threads on the bolt are up at the shoulder, and already unthreaded. The rest of the bolt appears to be smooth shaft, all the way out to the caliper bracket. I'm concerned about the pressure and force it will take to get the threads restarted on reinstallation of the bracket. It's so tight, I will not be able to feel if the threads are correct, or crossthreading. Any suggestions ?

Thanks, again. JC
 

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Possibly the shouldered area and the bushing in the shock is corroded, sand clean and lube.
Test the theads without shock installed.
It can just be the downward weight of the wheel and final drive putting pressure on the bolt. I've used a lever under the tire to push upwards to remove and install. Be sure to put a sinch strap from the center stand to the front engine guard so the bike doesn't take a nap on you if you are doing this on the center stand. If on a bike jack strap the bike to the jack to steady it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have, essentially, the same jack as WingAdmin on GoldwingDocs. Mine is aluminum, instead of steel. Positioned exactly the same as his, the bike seems to lift very ass heavy. The front comes way off the ground, before the rear ever leaves the ground. You can see that the jack has much more weight on the rear pad by an uneven lifting of the jack 'scissors'. When I did use it the last time, I had to take it off the center stand, and have someone else position the jack further back under the folded center stand to achieve a reasonable balance. Overall, it is still a very small footprint for such a large bike. Not my favorite way to work on things. (picture below) Apparently no longer available from Torin. Virtually identical to the Sears Craftsman model.

Regarding the shock bolt, the wheel is already removed, gone to the shop, and had the tire put on. The bolt is still very hard to turn. I have not yet removed it from the shock or swingarm. Just far enough to remove the caliper bracket. That's why I asked about the travel of the shock in relation to the swingarm. Surely the swingarm couldn't weigh that much. So is it likely that the shock is pushing down on the bolt creating the binding effect ?

While we're at it, the tire is mounted, and supposedly balanced via some electronic balance method. The weights are all on one side, in one place, and there are nine of them, marked 5 each, with what appears to be a brand, K&L I think. I assume they are 5 grams each. Isn't that a lot of weight for a balance ?

Just did a search, and 45 grams = 1.6 oz. I guess it's not as much as I thought. Anyway, sound reasonable ?
 

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Ummmm, that sounds like a lot of weight to me.

Personally, I do not like lead weights on m/c tires.
I much prefer to use beads, Dyna Beads, sand blasting beads, etc...

just as long as they are ceramic beads. About 2 oz in the front and 3 oz in the rear will make sure the tire is always balanced for its' life time.

The beads will spread around the tire as the rolling speed increases, seeking the perfect balance at all times.

That Torin jack does indeed look like my Craftsman Aluminum m/c jack.
 

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FWIW: This based on 14 year Love Affair w/yours truly & wife's '95SE/ California Friendship III sidecar rig. Am ex-USAF jet aircraft mechanic...do all my own work on our rig, except tire changes.
Wish to set something straight on brake pads: When rig went on the road in Summer, 2002, had replaced all 6 brake pads with new Honda OEMs. Could have cost us our life, if not for The Good Lord watching over us! Pads were broken in OK w/3 weeks of riding done. Was coming downhill late at night in northern NH to stop sign at bottom w/4-way intersection. Braked harder & harder...did NO GOOD...ended up in center of intersection! The ONLY thing which saved us was NO traffic present at the time! Badly shaken up, we continued home. Immediately contacted local, SUPER GL mechanic/ friend, JIM [ from whom I'd bought all parts, accessories, tires, helmets, etc. for 12 years, until his untimely death of leukemia in 2012 ]. HE recommended EBC type HH pads then & there [I'd never heard of them before]! Have run ONLY this brand/type for 12 years w/no problems AND with same OEM rotors!
Sidecar rigs are HEAVY...after a few days break-in on new EBC pads, our rig would STOP ON A DIME EVERY TIME WITH NO PROBLEMS! Even purposely went back to the same intersection we could have been injured or killed at and went downhill exactly the same way. Our rig stopped with NO problem, right where it should have!
Until one tries a product themselves, HOW can they express an opinion about it, good OR bad! My two cents on the matter. TTFN & RIDE SAFE ALWAYS.
.....Old Tom aka papasmurf in New Hampshire
 

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I don't like the narrowness of the aluminum jack. The one on the gwdocs site has the same width on the rear wheels as the front of the jack.
I just noticed that those instructions show him lifting the 1100. On the 1500s and 1800s, I place the rear pad on the center stand pivot (c-stand up). You have to play with the jack forward and back to find the sweet spot you like, also depends how much you take off the rear if it starts being light on the rear, you can put a block or small jack under the front of the motor or a block under the front tire. Are you putting the jack in from the right side of the bike as you should be, that way with the bike on the side stand you can start the jack under, hold hand brake set and the grip with one hand, other hand on the seat grab to pull the bike upright and steady with one hand on the hand brake so the bike doesn't move back or forward then slide the jack further under and start jack up(mine has foot controls for up and down on the Craftsman jack-steel). You can learn to do it yourself once you learn how to find the balance of the bike though a helper on the left side is advisable when available.

Honda used to offer a weight that clamped to the center of the rim ridge in different weights so the weight was fully centered.
 

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Honda still offers the weights in 10g, 20g and 30g. #11 on the fiche
http://www.westernhonda.com/fiche_section_detail.asp?section=2503376&category=Motorcycles&make=Honda&year=2000&fveh=132041

This is the jack I have in NH.
http://m.sears.com/craftsman-motorcycle-atv-jack/p-00950190000P

In Oceanside I have an older Torin jack similar but doesn't have the foot down control, which makes it harder as you have to reach down to turn the pressure release by hand so it's more challenging, pice was $40 from craigslist ad there a few years ago.
 

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Bluewater,

I agree with Papa Smurf. I see no issues with EBC pads at all. Some people are pretty anal about using OEM parts and tend to work facts and figures into their stories about the quality of OEM stuff in general, like some OEM parts were never engineered poorly to start with. EBC makes great parts as far as I am concerned as far as brake and clutch parts goes. I have been using them for a long long time.

Also yes to the change of the rubber cushions (dampeners) in the rear rim... BUT... make sure that you inspect the retaining plate and the aluminum inserts for wear. It should be obvious especially if the dampeners are worn. You will have to hammer in the new in dampeners and then install the inserts. Make sure the dampener pockets are clean and make sure both are in all the way.

This is what happened to mine in the time it took to go through the life of my rear tire (E3). When I replaced the tire they were good, then, next tire replacement they looked like this. The dampeners should have been replaced the previous tire change. DO NOT LUBE THE PINS!!!

It is always good to completely refresh your compressor, not just the desiccant. It's quick and easy and extends its life.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the comments, guys. Finished it up today. Went back to the shop that mounted and balanced the wheel. They use a pretty exotic electronic balancing machine, and assured me that the weight installed to balance is the correct weight and placement. They only stock 5gm weights, and that is the reason for the quantity (9).

Flushed and filled the air shock with 140ml of ATF. The oil that came out of the shock (also 140ml) was in surprisingly good shape. I doubt it has been changed before, so to come out a nice dark oily color, and no obnoxious smell, with no indication of moisture was a shock to me. Still, I flushed it with some ATF, and then filled it with the correct amount. I skipped the pump desiccant, as the oil was in such good shape.

Got the brake pads on with no issues. They seem to be seating in nicely, with what little riding I have done.

That lower left shock bolt that seemed to be binding, turned out to be, apparently, just the bolt hanging on what I assume is the rubber cushion in the lower shock. Sprayed it with some WD40 and it loosened right up. Sprayed it later with some silicone spray right before assembly. No problems.

I ran the wheel up to what would be about 70mph, 3000 rpms, in 5th gear to check for imbalance, while on the center stand. Seemed fine, with minimal vibration.

Now, a little venting:
Just a note regarding bike shops. I chose to do this work myself because of all the ancillary work I wanted to do while it was apart. I discovered the brake pad issue while doing it. But, the pads. Couldn't locate any Honda OEM's, went in search of EBC's, the HH version. One shop about 45min. away told me they had them, and also the Honda superseded version of Moly 60. When I got there, she had a pair of 'out of package pads' that she said were the EBC HH pads for the bike. The model # stamped was FA69...period. I had found that they should be FA69/3HH for the Wing. She swore up and down they were the correct pads, and the full sintered version. I wound up taking another pair of FA69/3V pads from her, based on what I could find online in the parking lot. Those are the semi-sintered pads for the bike. Didn't take the Moly 60 substitue, because they wanted $18 for it, and I had already found the Moly 60 at several shops around town for $11. Went to another rather old, large shop in St.Pete looking for the Moly, and happened upon the book that specs the correct pads. They make an organic FA69/3, the semi-sintered FA69/3V that I got from the first shop (after immediately returning the wrong and non-HH pads), and the full-sintered FA69/3HH that I was looking for. Turns out the second shop had the correct pads, stamped as such, in the package. I bought them as well, and the Moly 60. So, it turns out that the first shop was trying to sell me FA69 pads (the wrong pad for a Goldwing SE '97), that were not full-sintered, but organic pads, for the sintered price. I installed the HH pads, and may keep the semi-sintered as a spare set. I rode bikes a lot, back in the day. Early 70's to early 80's. I had forgotten my opinion of bike shops, in general....all of them, until this experience, yesterday. It reminded me of my opinion that bike shops view their customers like 'marks'. To be lied to, and screwed, at every opportunity. I came to that conclusion 30 years ago, and this only reinforced it. It seems, considering the fleeting nature of these shops, that they have to sell, sell, sell, anything, everything, in order to make a buck, to attempt to stay in business. Maybe that's the reason for their failure rate, in the first place. Anyway, I do have to say, the second shop, that had the right parts, that knew what they were doing, and run a first class operation, has been in business for at least 50 years, as I remember the same shop advertising when I was a kid. They will be on my list if I need to use a shops' service in the future. So, when dealing with the 'kids' behind the counter at you local bike service shop. You need to be informed. Know what you are looking for, by model and #. The internet has made this MUCH easier than years past. I'll keep doing any and all work that I can handle, before taking my bike to a shop. In 2.5 years with this bike, that has been all the work that has been performed. This forum is AAA+++. It makes us all smarter than we really are. Thanks to all who contributed to my question, and all others on these forum pages.
:bow:
 
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