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Pushed 5 new rubber damper blocks w/aluminum inserts into my rear hub cavity. Attempted to install part #42617-MT8-000 flange, which locks them in place. CANNOTCOMPRESS new rubber block assemblies, to allow flange to turn and enter locking groove! There HAS to be asimpletrick to doing this but am at a losson how to accomplish. HELP!!

TTFN.....Old Tom aka papasmurf in NH

:stumped:
 

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Can you post a picture Tom? Is it the flange pins not sliding into the bushes is the problem?
 

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The new rubbers are... well... new, and have not previously been compressed behind their retaining plate (the gold steel disc that holds the dampers into the rear wheel - see photo below)



In the pic you can see the "tabs" on the plate need to fit under raised bosses cast into the wheel hub. this actually requires a pretty good amount of rotaton of that disk -- about 60* of rotation to align and with the "fat" rubbers sticking up high this can be tough to do... kinda like a tough-to-open pickle jar!



First, I add a touch of anti-seize to the outter tabs of the plate and bosses on the wheel (it's a dissimilar metal friction area.. you can wipe off any excess later)



I also wipe the rubber faces of the dampers with a light silicone oiland/or spray the bottom of the retaining plate with aerosol silicone to help things slip...



Look at the wheel and at the plate -- BOTH of them have a small alignment arrow. The arrow on the wheelin the photo is the first spoke counter-clockwise from the valve-stem.The arrows shouldbe alighnedas a starting position for thisretaining plate.



The next bit is the booger (with new dampers)... the push & turn bit. Sounds like this is where you're stuck. The idea is that you need to compress the properly installed dampers AND turn the retainer counter-clockwise enough to hold things in place ... all in one move.



I'm fat (about 17.9 stones :p) so having the wheel laid flat and just pushing down has worked for me... I also use a deadblow hammer and a brass drift to "start" the rotation as I lean on things. (really, it's one of the processes that I'll shut the garage door to do, I'm not sure I want my neighbors to see my fatass floppin' about like a beached whale)...



I can say that the last one I did had e re-thinking my process. At taht time I got a bit of clean 4x4 lumber cut to fit inside the wheel here. I Cut a notch into the center of the block to fit over the bearing hub; the net result was a block of wood that fit flat against the retaining plate.Two "lag bolts" were added to offer some way to "engage" the slots in the retainer... (I screqwed-up the placement on mine, with 5-slots these bolts need to be off-set fromt he block's centerline quite a bit to engage properly. One done, the "block" can be used as a big handle to press and twist the plate. I did have to grind the heads of the bolts down some (perhaps a pan-head or similar would be better here??)



I can say that pressing in wasn't really ever my issue; I seemed to have more of an issue turning it once it was pressed in. Using a hammer to dirve the plate to twist once I had it pressed in seemed to do the trick nicely (I've not been able to gently turn the plate except on used dampers).



Only other thought I have is that one or more of the dampers may need to be flipped... Are they all in OK and all look the same?





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[align=left]Good luck! (I'm thinking my next one will slide up on the shop press and have its plate turned with a brass drift! - I'm getting too old for the whale-shows.:gunhead:)[/align]
 

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I smack the rubber blocks (with metal inserts installed into each) into the wheel using a rubber mallet... no problem assembling after that.
 

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i had to do exactly what ALEX did to got them in.....take a rubber hammer and hit each of the pads, going around in a circle, then they should go in. by the way....make sure that you clean all of that area where the pads go before you try and install them....sometimes there is enough dirt/crud there to prohibit the pads from going down all the way....good luck.
 

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Same here...used a rubber mallet to get pads all the way in and then the retaining plate slided in easy. Not sure the retaining plate needs to be compressed nor whether the pads should be lubed.
 
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