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Discussion Starter #1
98' GL1500 SE continues to Crank Over with th key in the Off position!
I tried to start my bike a week ago and the battery was stone dead- i discovered that the key had been left on in the first click position. ok no biggie right? I hooked up the battery charger for a few hours. It started right up. I let it run for 15 minutes or so and shut it off. A few days later I tried to start it again and the battery was dead again. so I was going to Jump Start it off my boat battery.
When I hooked up the jumper cables the engine started to crank over ( key off and not touching the start button) Just simply hooking up power to the battery makes it turn over !
Do I have a stuck starter solenoid? and how does this happen from sitting for a few days?
 

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I would guess your starter relay A is stuck.
 

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98' GL1500 SE continues to Crank Over with th key in the Off position!
I tried to start my bike a week ago and the battery was stone dead- i discovered that the key had been left on in the first click position. ok no biggie right? I hooked up the battery charger for a few hours. It started right up. I let it run for 15 minutes or so and shut it off. A few days later I tried to start it again and the battery was dead again. so I was going to Jump Start it off my boat battery.
When I hooked up the jumper cables the engine started to crank over ( key off and not touching the start button) Just simply hooking up power to the battery makes it turn over !
Do I have a stuck starter solenoid? and how does this happen from sitting for a few days?
Give the solenoid a few "raps" with the handle of a screwdriver. The most common cause of stuck solenoids is weak batteries. When you first engage the starter the amp draw is high but just for a fraction of a second with a strong battery. If the battery is not up to snuff it can not kick the starter hard enough to get by the initial high amp draw. So it continues to draw high amps and the high amps fuses the contacts together.. It needs a fully charged good battery to give the starter a fast spin to get things moving. That is when the amp draw can go from 300 amp to as low as 30 amps. If if the speed of the starter is slow because of bad battery (or poor wiring) the starter will continue to draw high amps and fuse the contacts internal the solenoid. (relay) As long as the contacts are fused and touching the engine will crank and the starter will continue to run.In essence it takes 300 amps to get up to speed and only 30 amps to keep it there. That is assuming you can get the starter up to speed with good battery and wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, I'll get give it a try and report back on it- I think i'm in need of a new battery- this one is 6 years old
-Jeff
 

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Thanks guys, I'll get give it a try and report back on it- I think i'm in need of a new battery- this one is 6 years old
-Jeff
get an AGM battery, no NOT waste money on a Wet Cell.

the engine will start before you can get your fingers off the Start Button.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had a AMG battery in my ebay shopping cart for a while but hadn't bought it - I do plan to buy an AMG
 

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I have also had this situation where the starter would run as soon as key was turned on. The wire coming down from start switch had shorted out behind steering head. It would blow fuses also though if handlebars were turned hard left.
gumbyred
 

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WingRider, You could have had a couple of scenario's....

1. Low voltage battery caused the relay A contacts to stick in the closed position.

2. The relay A failed.

First with ignition OFF, test if the relay A contacts are open or closed.

Check for voltage on the relay A terminal labeled "M". Voltage = closed. No voltage = open.

If closed I would replace the relay A.

Next check the condition of your battery. If it will not accept a charge OR fails a load test, replace your battery with an AGM battery such as a Deka. Sold under several different names at auto parts stores etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, as Redwing52 mentioned, I tapped on the solenoid with the butt end of a screwdriver- the cranking over when the battery is connected has stopped happening. I haven't had the battery tested yet.
 

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.In essence it takes 300 amps to get up to speed and only 30 amps to keep it there. That is assuming you can get the starter up to speed with good battery and wiring.
Normal starter motor current draw on the 1500 during cranking is right around 110A.
 

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Normal starter motor current draw on the 1500 during cranking is right around 110A.
JD,
I realized that just as I was finishing the post. I was thinking cars. Diesel trucks are around 700. I thought about changing it but decided the theory is the same so I left it alone at 300. . Nice catch though.
 

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Your call weather you think the relay A is reliable (or not). +1 for battery replacement.....!!
I look at it like a dog. The first bite is free. Next time it's gone. As Dave said it really is your call but if you get a good battery and keep it fully charged with a battery tender chances are very good it will last a long time. Just my experience and opinion.
I have disassembled many to find one burn spot about 5% of the total area. The other 95% looked good. The exception is if it left a tit on the surface. Then it will not last but if that is the case the screwdriver can not break it apart usually. Very common on diesel engines. They even have a solenoid contact set you can buy separate for the old 24 volt 40MT starter. Had to hit them with a baseball bat! :p. Kit was just the 2 studs and the copper washer basically.
I have repaired the motorcycle solenoids by taking all the nuts off the studs and prying the 3 crimps so it comes apart. Sand the ends of the studs and sand the washer. Some you can turn the washer over. Put it back together and use a punch to re-crimp. Actually easy to do. I'm sure lots of others here have done the same.
 

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. They even have a solenoid contact set you can buy separate for the old 24 volt 40MT starter. Had to hit them with a baseball bat! :p. Kit was just the 2 studs and the copper washer basically.
We used to could get a kit like that for the old ND starters on Honda cars. Could be done in the car.
 

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We used to could get a kit like that for the old ND starters on Honda cars. Could be done in the car.
Yup, Why sell a $5 contact kit when they can sell a $300 starter. It's a jip for sure. The old GM cars you could take the cover off. Sand off all the green corrosion and it was good as new. Now everything is crimped on. It can still be done but kind of cobbled together and not worth all the time. We must be old, huh? I can remember changing an air filter by opening the hood and spin off one wing nut. Now it is harder than that to check the transmission fluid on GM cars. :)
 

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Starter solenoid was giving out in GF's '99 Pontiac Grand Prix 3.8L. Typical GM Starter, the solenoid in addition to having the relay contacts works a plunger which throws the Bendix drive into the flywheel, same as on an old Chevy.

Solenoid is replaceable all day long for ~$28 on an old Chevy. Remove two screws, give solenoid a twist and off it comes. This one was replaceable same way, too, but held on by some funky-headed screws that looked like a 5-pointed Torx. No tool to remove them. Turns out can't buy just a solenoid anyway, only way to get a new solenoid is spend $175 for the entire starter. >GRRR<

Automatic transmission on GF's New-to-her Hyundai is intended to be totally non-serviceable, there IS NO dipstick.
 

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The socket you need is just what you think. It is called an inverted Torx and sells for about $10. , Be careful as there is a similar called serated allen but it is finer. You are right about the solenoids getting harder to find. They still can be had. Ebay has them cheap as well as a few other places
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320743
 
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