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With the help of a member here, I am troubleshooting my rediculously poor gas mileage. Yes, the air filter needs changed, I also have a new fuel filter on the way, but I haven't thought to look at the plugs yet, and it was a lot easier than I would have thought too :)!
 

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So is there a born on date for spark plugs? :)

I know nothing about plug conditions except that these aren't good! Is this just old age and lots of use without being changed? Running rich, lean, other? The sad thing is the bike has still been running fantastic (minus the poor mileage) yay for the bulletproof WING! Thanks!
-Daniel
 

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They look ok to me .
Some carbon build up so i would suspect the po did a lot of in city slow speed riding .
Clean and gap and they will be good for another 62000 miles.
Run a can or two of Seafoam through it " follow the directions on the can " and dont baby it . This should clear out the carbon from the cyls. and valves.
Enjoy.
 

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The plugs certainly look good, but did you check whether these are the correct ones for the bike?
 

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Try looking back a few posts and running the tw-c3 (or whatever) 2 cycle oil additive. It'll clean them plugs right back up. seafoam never cleaned the plugs like this oil. Theres no burning of the anode and no gum up, the plug seems just a bit soiled from low heat. mine were like that til I tried the 2 cycle treatment, now everything is clean. AND change the air cleaner.....air = fuel = proper mix = clean plugs
 

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They look good to me, maybe running a little rich...or just to much city riding not getting those plugs hot enough. Maybe see if there is a hotter plug you can use....?



Or just go out on the highway...and let her rip...!
 

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highway or city ridin, plugs should burn the same. A good running motor always burns well, there's no taking it out on the freeway to clean the plugs. If all things inside the engine are working well it will burn right at any rpm. An engine that can't burn right in city driving surely isn't going to perform well on the freeway. This has been proven since the late 60's high performance car engines were tested out of the yahoo.
 

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If that the case then WHY did my Honda Shadow and I think my GL1800 as well have two sent of plugs....? One which that say are normal ones...the other set if your doing lots of high speed riding...of which those plugs are one heat range cooler....



Just my 2 cents on it.
 

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Standard plugs are cheap. While you have them out i would just change them and be sure. Iridiums work great in mine but they cost more.
 

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Lloyd,



you seem like a great guy with a performance background. The issue here though was that standard plugs for a Wing OR for any motor vehicle should perform well under ALL conditions.......freeway/city. I don't think any of us could put plugs in that would be able to perform under only one condition so we go with a 'standard performance' plug that works in a wide range and not foul or burn out. Specified plugs that foul out by being too oily can only be a tuneup issue. AKA : lean it out ...specified plugs that burn too hot have a tuneup issue AKA : too hot......the bottom line i'm trying to get to is if you have not done anything to a factory engine as far as modifications go then the plugs should perform quite well, and if you have issues, look to the ovwerall engine tuneup before thinking an engine just needsto be run hard to clean out the pipes. Any feed back you have on my response is welcome, because you seem to have a knowledge of performance in engines

Al
 

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Indianawantsme wrote:
Standard plugs are cheap. While you have them out i would just change them and be sure. Iridiums work great in mine but they cost more.
Indy, what is the difference between the iridiums and standard plugs. I've hear of them, I just never knew what made them better.

Al
 

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Indianawantsme wrote:
Standard plugs are cheap. While you have them out i would just change them and be sure. Iridiums work great in mine but they cost more.
Those plugs could be at least eleven and maybe twenty years old for all we know. Lets just leave them in until the bike is retired.:thumbsdown:

Another vote to change them now. Note on your maintenance records and then clean or replace at regular intervals.:thumbsup: Gap at the lower end of service limit.:)

JD
 

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Predator wrote:
Indianawantsme wrote:
Standard plugs are cheap. While you have them out i would just change them and be sure. Iridiums work great in mine but they cost more.
Indy, what is the difference between the iridiums and standard plugs. I've hear of them, I just never knew what made them better.

Al
This is what it looks like.
 

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Iridium is very hard and a great conductor. Doesn't wear much and will not foul out easily under adverse conditions like idling a long time and maybe accidental flooding. The NGK or other spark plug website might explain it better than me. Platinum plugs made me a believer when i used them in a 2 cycle 4- wheeler and they lasted a lot longer. Older kids drove it hard enough of course, but the youngest drove it too slow and it fouled plugs if i used standard type. I didn't want to go to a hotter standard plug and burn a hole in the piston if it got run hard, so i just used the platinum and it worked for both types of riding.
 

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First those plugs look like the engine is running pretty rich, maybe the floats set wrong, very dirty air filter or sticking CV sliders in the carbs. Also those plugs look pretty worn, those rounded edges on the center conductor makes it harder for the ignition system to create a decent arc.

Iridium and platinum plugs main advantage is the fine wire center electrode. TheE field stress created by the applied high voltage of the ignition system is concentrated more at a sharp point than at a larger rounded one. That means the finer wire will arc sooner at a lower voltage than an old spark plug with a rounded electrode. All electrodes will round off somewhat (as those in the pictures have) after enough use due to erosion caused by the high heat of the sharp edges due to combustion and arcing. Iridium and platinum will resist this erosion better so it takes longer for those type plugs deteriorate.

To understand the E field stress think of a Van DeGraff machine. The big ball on top doesn't throw an arc until something comes near it that causes the charge built up on one part the surface of the smooth sphere and the bang! If you connect a short piece of wire to stick up from the surface of the sphere it will throw arcs sooner and further to any approaching object.
 

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Indianawantsme wrote:
Iridium is very hard and a great conductor. Doesn't wear much and will not foul out easily under adverse conditions like idling a long time and maybe accidental flooding. The NGK or other spark plug website might explain it better than me. Platinum plugs made me a believer when i used them in a 2 cycle 4- wheeler and they lasted a lot longer. Older kids drove it hard enough of course, but the youngest drove it too slow and it fouled plugs if i used standard type. I didn't want to go to a hotter standard plug and burn a hole in the piston if it got run hard, so i just used the platinum and it worked for both types of riding.
The heat of the plug has NOTHING to do with burning a hole in a piston...a hotter plug just means...just that...its runs hotter so that carbon on the porciline burns off...thats all...! Burning a hole in the pistion is a fuel and or timing/spark related problem... Running too lean will blow a hole in a pistion far easier then running rich...that just carbons up everything.
 

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Yep, when your two stroke crapped out and the spark plug end was plated with aluminum when you removed it, with difficulty, from the head you knew you had a seriously lean condition. A lot of the early two stroke bikes and snowmachines had adjustable jets. A lot of guys discovered they could lean out the engine and get a bit more speed or power. They soon learned that a two stroke is designed to run somewhat rich just to provide a bit more cooling to the piston and internals. Interesting how an aluminum pistonbehaves when the exhaust temperature gets up arond 1300F or so.
 
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