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Anybody have a procedure to adjust the brgs? My newly acquired '98 (21k miles) is in need. Is there a mechanical procedure page somewhere? Thanks much!!
 

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Thanks for the reply. That is an excellent a step by step component removal/adjustment process. Thanks. Bob
 

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rkjjeep wrote:
Thanks for the reply. That is an excellent a step by step component removal/adjustment process. Thanks. Bob
If you want to replace the bearings, you'll need to disassemble the steering head as described in the how-to Vic linked to.

If you just want to snug them up just follow the instructions in your Clymer book from seating the bearings in the assembly portion of the manual.

If you were just looking as to troubleshoot the bearings, ther've been multiple postings on the methods for accomplishing that. My favorite is to:

1) Place bike on centerstand

2) Secure centerstand with a tiedown forward to frame.

3) Place a jack under the engine (Use a wooden block as a cushion)

4) Using jack lift front wheel clear of the ground

5) Grasp the forks as near the axle as possible and attempt to move fore and aft as well as side to side.

6) If any movement is noted at the steering head adjustment is required.

7) Turn the forks with the handlebars side to side

8) If any "roughness" or "rattling" is noted, inspection or replacement of bearings is indicated, requiring a disassembly of the steering head.
 

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Tony, Thanks. I do have looseness when checking the bearings the old fashioned way. So loose I don't know if I have notchiness or not. I'll snug them down and see what is left. I was looking for the fast way to snug them down. This is the normal 1500SE with about 20K that got great oil changes but not much else. Still has orig tires (never seen a front tire cupped this bad). I've owned over 50 bikes and put myself thru school as a motorcycle mechanic and am always looking for the "quickest" way to do something like this (all that flat rate experience.)

Thanks, Bob
 

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I'd proceed with the seating portion...

Gold Wings cup tires at an unbelievable rate because they weigh so much, and their owners just ride them without doing maintenancebecause they just don't break down like other machines.

Tire inflation is key, I've ruined a few myself trying to get the inflation right.

What I've found works well with the Dunlop Elite II's for a mix of single and 2-up is 38 PSI front and 41 PSI rear.

Different tires require different inflation pressures because of differing construction techniques.
 

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Goldwinger1984 wrote:
Tony, congratulations on the new GURU title.

Vic
Thank you very much.

I'd post a picture of a rabbit with a pancake on it's head...naw, that'd just be silly.:goofygrin:
 

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Stilll a bit uncertain. Clymer calls for handlebar removal for example. I'm looking to remove the minimum number of components to be able to adjust the bearings. Bob
 

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rkjjeep wrote:
Stilll a bit uncertain. Clymer calls for handlebar removal for example. I'm looking to remove the minimum number of components to be able to adjust the bearings. Bob
Maybe you could stop by a magic shop and see if they have a steering head bearing adjustment potion.

The only way I know how to adjust the bearings is to take thebars and several other parts off.

It's a lot easier to adjust the bearings than it is to fight off a high speed wobble.

Vic
 

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rkjjeep wrote:
I've owned over 50 bikes and put myself thru school as a motorcycle mechanic and am always looking for the "quickest" way to do something like this (all that flat rate experience.)

Thanks, Bob
Well, I'm not a bike mechanic, just a dabbler but if I felt any looseness I'd bite the bullet and pull the triple tree off. It isn't all that much work once you have things stripped down to adjust the steering head nut. As for feeling the condition of the bearings the book calls for removal of the fork tubes. You can do it without that of course but the weight of the forks, wheel and all that will mask any chance of feeling the condition of the bearings for anything less than total failure. The problem with 'looseness' is that you don't know if the tension nut is loose or the bearings are crapped out. You can take a lot of short cuts on four wheelers, but bikes are somewhat like airplanes, a failure that would just mean sitting beside the road in a car can be a lot more serious in the air or on two wheels. Thankfully I work on my bike and don't depend on someone taking a short cut to make flat rate time.
 

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Reading the above comments with interest as I have a problem with my forks, the bike handles well at all speeds, the problem is a vibration through the handle bars, Its not a tyre or wheel problem as the wheel was balanced on replacement of tyre and then rechecked, the vibration is not all the time, normally comes to light after riding along a poorly maintained road surface. I had the fork oil changed and the problem disappeared for months. Comments from wing owners tell me the head bearing require tightening.

My question is,

Am I on the right track

what is required to tighten down the bearing, what special tools if any would be required, I have a toque wrench.

The bike is an SE1500 1997 with 20,000 miles.

Look forward to your comments.

Mike
 

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I shouldn't talk to you Mike since you won't let us know where that damn island is. But I'm a weak old man and feel magnanimous right now. You don't need a torque wrench, the book calls for the fork to require a pull of 4lbs to start it moving (I could be wrong on the exact lbs of force, my manual is in the shop). If the tree swings with no resistance, it's too loose. You pull the handlebars, the plastic cover, pop off the signal cancel wire's grommet, remove the wheel, fender, forks and the bottom cover mounted to the triple tree. Then disconnect and remove the turn signal cancel switch. Back to the top and take off the nut and the top of the tree and the steering head nut will be exposed. I'd pull the thing off so I could check the bearings. A large socket can be ground down leaving a couple teeth to engage the notches in the nut, you could weld a couple pieces of steel to a socket or proper sized piece of pipe or whatever you cobble up. The nut can be removed with a drift or chisel and a mallet (sounds better than hammer) but I'd not want to tighten it that way. According to the book tighten the nut until a spring scale hooked to one side of the tree and pulled perpendicular to it takes 4lbs to start the tree turning. Clymers has a good description of the process. No need to take much other than the ignition switch cover and the two top cover side fillers off. Be easier on the earlier models.
 

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Hi Exavid

Thanks for the information, I have time on my hands at the moment so I will start the process this weekend, as for the location, we are west of your rock just a little smaller with a lot of woman.
 

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Let me try to clear up one thing - I didn't mean the quickest half assed way - I meant the quickest way to do it RIGHT. Many published procedures call for MUCH more component removal than is actually required for a thorough job. Thanks, I get the idea of how to do this now, and yes, I'll pull it all down and inspect the bearings. Bob
 

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rkjjeep wrote:
Let me try to clear up one thing - I didn't mean the quickest half assed way - I meant the quickest way to do it RIGHT. Many published procedures call for MUCH more component removal than is actually required for a thorough job. Thanks, I get the idea of how to do this now, and yes, I'll pull it all down and inspect the bearings. Bob
That's good to hear Bob. Those steering head bearings are crucial to safe driving on a motorcycle.

Good luck and if you need advice or info if you get stumpedyou know where to come for it.

Vic
 
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