Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Master Sgt. USAF Retired.
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

What would be a fair price for labor; changing the timing belts on a GL1500SE?
Norm
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
132 Posts
imported post

I didn't consider this price "fair", so I did it myself, and saved a bundle. It's not as hard as it seems.

My Honda dealer wanted $520 to change my timing belts. Part of the cost was $150 for Honda belts ([email protected]$75).

I bought 2 Gates belts off of ebay for $36. Did the labor myself.

Savings..... $484.

I had never done this, and I had the new belts on and the engine running in 1 1/2 hours. I let it run for 15 minutes, re-checked the belt tension, then buttoned everything back up. The 1 1/2 hour time did not include buttoning everything back up, because I was waxing the plastic before I was installing it. ;)

I followed the great pictorial instructions on this site.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/1500timingbelts.htm
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
612 Posts
imported post

A dealer may want to charge 3-4 hours labour. In reality 2.5 hours is more than fair.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
132 Posts
imported post

if you don't feel comfortable doing the belts yourself, you might also check if the dealer will give you a good price break if you remove and reinstall the plastic at home. The plastic is 1/2 the labor.
 

·
Lost on this *****
Joined
·
4,317 Posts
imported post

I don't think there is anything "fair" about dealer prices. It's more like what your "willing" to pay.

Lots of help here to do most (if not ALL) maintenance on your bike. I know just by looking at the instructions of doing the belts can be intimidating. But it really is more simple then it looks or sounds.

This is another great "How To" done by Rudy,,,,,,

http://goldwingtech.info/timingbelts/timingbelts.htm
 

·
Just another ORF!
Joined
·
8,189 Posts
imported post

Yup ... save yourself a bundle of cash and do it yourself.

Beside not being very difficult to do (just a bit time consuming if it's the 1st time you've ever removed that much plastic) you'll have a lot more self confidence/self satisfaction to tackle most/all other maintenance items that are required and are fairly simple to do. All in all, you will save a lot of money and will know the job has been done right, to your satisfaction!

Just read the tutorials a couple of times before, so you understand them before you start. If you have any questions, there are a lot of members here to answer them and guide you through it!

Only thing you need are a few basic tools, some time(schedule a Saturday) and some space to spread the plastic panels out on. I did this job in my 10 x 15 storage room, that housed all my large wood working tools and the bike got squeezed in between them and associated 'stuff'.



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
152 Posts
imported post

+1 on doing the job yourself it is not that difficult just take your time. Check out Rudy's page like Winger77 suggested everything you need to know is right there.If you can pilot a plane you can change your timing belts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
437 Posts
imported post

I would not say it is an "easy" job. Time consuming yes, about 2.5 hours for someone who has done it and familiar with removing the parts. For someone who has never done it allow a full day and be careful when removing the belts to ensure the cams DO NOT move with the belts off. I know a guy who thought he could do it and it ended up costing about $1500 to get both heads rebuilt.
I would highly recommend a manual for those that are handy and can swing a wrench. If you are not one of those guys then take it to a shop.
2.5 - 3 hours of labor plus the price of two belts. Use Gates T 275 belts, about half price of Honda's.
 

·
Just another ORF!
Joined
·
8,189 Posts
imported post

The biggest (longest) part of the job is removing/reinstalling all the plastic - yes!

.... doing the actual removing/installing/checking of the belts/tensionersonce you have the plastic stripped off,- 2 hrs TOPS if you've never done this before and before you start closing things back up!

Like I said, go over the tutorials first a couple of times to familiarize yourself and don't rush the actual belt changing/checking bits, as this is where people can/do make mistakes. Take your time and double/triple check things!

A lot of us herehave oncestood where you are now standing! Don't let someone who is afraid of their own abilities put you off giving it a go. :waiting: Just follow the steps outlined in Rudy's tutorial closely. If unsure, stop and give us a holler. We are here to guide you through it, if needed. :grinner: :cooler:

While there, it is a good time to do other maintenance items, like bleed the front brake/clutch, spark plugs,change out the coolant if it hasn't been changed in the past 2 years and to change out the air filter, sub-air filter and the cruise element filter. Add all those up and I'll bet you they would charge you close to, if not more than $1000, if done separately, for just the labour alone.

No other way to get to know your bike so well.
 

·
Master Sgt. USAF Retired.
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
imported post

Thanks for the input...My bike has right a seventy thousand and I know what the ramifications are of losing a "cam or timing belt", on any kind of engine. There is no record of my belts being changed. (short of massacring a quote)"Gentlemen, we have the tools; technology and the expertise." ;) What we don't have is the time, however...with all of your "confident input," as soon as I get a break in the weather and get my students through a turbine engine; hot section inspection,I'll do the deed.
Thanks for the support.
Norm

BTW: I really and I mean really, do not like anyone working on my vehicles, especially my motorcycles. It's probably more physiological than anything, but I've had more bad experiences than good. I'm not "taking a shot" at the guy trying to make a living and I'm more than willing to pay someone for a "job well done." However it's the "well done," that's hard to find.
 

·
Just another ORF!
Joined
·
8,189 Posts
imported post

circlepilot wrote:
Thanks for the input...My bike has right a seventy thousand and I know what the ramifications are of losing a "cam or timing belt", on any kind of engine. There is no record of my belts being changed. (short of massacring a quote)"Gentlemen, we have the tools; technology and the expertise." ;) What we don't have is the time, however...with all of your "confident input," as soon as I get a break in the weather and get my students through a turbine engine; hot section inspection,I'll do the deed.
Thanks for the support.
Norm

BTW: I really and I mean really, do not like anyone working on my vehicles, especially my motorcycles. It's probably more physiological than anything, but I've had more bad experiences than good. I'm not "taking a shot" at the guy trying to make a living and I'm more than willing to pay someone for a "job well done." However it's the "well done," that's hard to find.

Exactly! ... that's why I and many more here do all their own maintenance.

Most dealerships are rushing the jobs so they can get another bike on the lift, to make more money and a lot of times, parts are left off/lost. I don't know how many times I see that while working on other member's bikes! :doh: :ShakeHead:

Good for you at deciding to give it a go! :coollep: It really isn't that difficult!



Dusty
 

·
Monkey with a Football
Joined
·
19,237 Posts
imported post

circlepilot wrote:
BTW: I really and I mean really, do not like anyone working on my vehicles, especially my motorcycles. It's probably more physiological than anything, but I've had more bad experiences than good. I'm not "taking a shot" at the guy trying to make a living and I'm more than willing to pay someone for a "job well done." However it's the "well done," that's hard to find.
Bad part is you don't KNOW if it's well done until your azz and your investment is on the line. The mechanic risks neither of these.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,318 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
250 Posts
imported post

Thought I'd revive this thread rather than starting over ...



Has anyone heard of RockAuto.com? They list Gates T275 timing belts for $14.49. Could this be a nock-off being sold as Gates? Compared to $70 for OEM !! Even O' Reilly is $32 for the same thing.



I like saving a little money but this just makes you wonder ...



Thanks

Pat
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
imported post

Rock auto is as good as a place as any to buy belts. Amazon lists the belts at $14.05 with free

shipping.....-Rich
 

·
Oh - THAT guy...
Joined
·
3,258 Posts
imported post

Doing it yourself also lets you inspect/clean things the 'stealer' will ignore - hey, it's not their bike.

As for a cam moving that is no big deal. Just realign per the WONDERFUL tutorials on this site. You will not damage a valve turning the cam by hand if it moves. I have always done my own vehicle work (poor type farmer kid) but did feel intimidated the first time I did this to my first wing. It went surprisingly well.

When I did mine this spring (my first 1500) I did a lot of other stuff at the same time. I had my front wheel off for a new tire as well as the forks out getting rebuilt so I had lots of room to sit on my butt in front of it. You do NOT need to do this, but it made it easier for space. Have a gallon of mixed coolant ready as you need to remove the lower radiator hose anyway. I had to remove a couple small things that were in the way when I did mine, but they were small and very easy.

Worst case? You put it back together and take it to someone for the work. Best case? You save a bundle and gain experience and confidence.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
73 Posts
imported post

Just finished doing mine and did not have to remove the radiator hose. Did have to move the heater hose out of the way tho. I followed the tutorial on this site. Super easy - but - check those timing marks!!! Also, good if you pull/replace spark plugs at the same time, so that you are not fighting 150+ psi in the combustion chambers when you turn it by hand.
 

·
Oh - THAT guy...
Joined
·
3,258 Posts
imported post

What he (^) said. I left mine just catching the threads so piston-compressed air could get out easy, but junk would not fall in the hole.
I did the coolant because it was time to change it, and pulling that bottom hose gave me more room to play with so it made the timing belt job easier in the process.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
552 Posts
imported post

Since my timing belt budget was blown on tracking down and replacing carb diaphragms, there was no money left to hire a pro to do my T-belts. The instructions on this site are well worth the price of admission! The job went well, and as the prior posters stated, it is a good time to get better acquainted with your bike and to knock out some other tasks. This is not a hard or difficult job, just follow the instructions. The hardest part of the entire job for me was getting the big cover off, so I dreaded having to put it back on; but unlike most things I've encountered in my life that are similar, it went on much more easily than it came off.

Take your time, be careful, enjoy yourself, then go riding...:action:
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top