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the honda workshop manual says replace the wheel bearing when removing the rear wheel, do i really need to do them if they are ok? are both wheel bearing the same size or is each one is different? it also says remove the saddlebags and trunk as one unit, is this the way too go? ive got the pull the wheel to replace the valve stem as i have a slow leak at the valve stem seal.

thanks ed
 

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I agree with Dave about the bearings.

Only the left saddlebag has to be removed to get the wheel out and the reason for removing that bag is because the brake calliper won't move out of the way of the tyre with that saddlebag still in place, the calliper bumps off it and obstructs the wheel on the way out.
 

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Agreed, I've changed my 1500's rear tire three times without changing the wheel bearings that now have 130,000 miles on them. I do check the bearings by hand for roughness or play each time I have the wheel off. Like GWNorman I only remove the left bag and rotate the left mufflerout and down down a bit to clear the axle end that pulls out from the left side. Takes around 30 minutes or less once you've had a bit of practice.
 

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EDDIE W wrote:
the honda workshop manual says replace the wheel bearing when removing the rear wheel, do i really need to do them if they are ok? are both wheel bearing the same size or is each one is different? it also says remove the saddlebags and trunk as one unit, is this the way too go? ive got the pull the wheel to replace the valve stem as i have a slow leak at the valve stem seal.

thanks ed
One point to remember is the bearings are also used in like 200lb ATVs, etc. They're either overkill for the lighter bikes, or underkill for the GL.

Frankly, I think things like wheel bearings are such cheap insurance that you might as well make it an annual or bi-annual thing, especially on the heavier bikes.

And GL1500s are kinda known for chewing up bearings.
 

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What makes you think the 1500's are hard on bearings? I replaced my front, with 100,000 on the odometer, and as far as I know, it was the first time. A number of my friends have 1500's and it never seemed to be a problem. Just wondering where you heard that, or experienced that.
 

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I work on a lot of bikes (small part time shop). The fronts are a little undersized, IMO and the mismatched ones in the rear, the thinner one can take a bit of a beating. All depends on how you ride it. I recently had a chat with a goldwing "expert" I know (he does the same thing on the opposite coast) and agrees.

Not saying it's a "OH MY GOD YOU'RE GOING TO DIE EVERY 10,000 MILES" kind of thing, but for the price of the bearings in the aftermarket and with Honda recommending it in the manual and with my personal experience on bikes... yeah, why not just put them in every couple of tire changes.

*shrugs*
 

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I agree there. Changing tires is usually a winter project, so why not change the bearings, every second tire or so. Cheap and peace of mind. Especially if many of your trips, like mine, are 500+ miles one way. Hate to break down on the road.
 
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