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agent provocateur
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
O2 sensors for the GL1800



Now as I understand it, the GL1800's have two O2 sensors one on each side...fine. Now my understanding is that these O2 sensors are more of a ON & OFF type like a switch in that if there is to much un burnt fuel or lack of a set % of O2 remaining in the exhaust, that the O2 sensor turn ON or OFF to make the needed fuel ratio adjustments that are needed.

Now here is the question... Has anyone of you used a NON - OEM O2 sensor in the GL1800..? I understand that so called WIDE BAND O2 sensors are not a ON or OFF type switch like the stock OEM ones in the gold wing. Now will the wide band O2 sensor work better as they are not a ON or OFF type but the output voltage varies with the amount of O2 found in the exhaust...and if so...will the ECU or whatever its connected to be able to make better use of this varying output to make better fuel ratio adjustments...?

 

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I think you are mistaken about how the sensors work, never heard of such a thing as an on/off O2 sensor, they all vary output depending on the amount of O2 in the exhaust, but even if it were a different type would not work with the existing computer.
 

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agent provocateur
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think you are mistaken about how the sensors work, never heard of such a thing as an on/off O2 sensor, they all vary output depending on the amount of O2 in the exhaust, but even if it were a different type would not work with the existing computer.
You would think that the output would be more of a varying voltage output depending on the level of O2 found. However I have had many refer to then as like a ON / OFF sort of deal...which I have to tell you I really do not see it that way. Myself I am more of a old school guy the carb and so on....all this fuel injection stuff has me at time a little confused at times.
 

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I think you are mistaken about how the sensors work, never heard of such a thing as an on/off O2 sensor, they all vary output depending on the amount of O2 in the exhaust, but even if it were a different type would not work with the existing computer.
+1
An O2 sensor does sweep from low (lean) to high (rich) and some people may refer to them as on/off since the cycle rate from low to high is less than one second. The sweep is detrmined by O2 measured in the exhaust.
Anywhere from .1 to .9 volts volts depending on the system.
 

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The Irish Crew
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Wide band sensors just have a wider sweep which allows them to be used in a wider range of bikes or cars. The downside is they (some of them) can result in erratic idle in some vehicles.
 

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How I understand it is that the Stock Narrow band sensors detect A/F mixture around 12/1 ratio. The wide band, used in Flex Fuel Vehicles, range is expanded from from approx. 11/1 to 14/1 but they have to have an accompaning MAP in the computer to be of use. In other words replacing your narrow band with wide band won't make a lick of difference as the ECM map is designed around a 12/1 mixture.

That is my understanding and I could be wrong.
 

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An O2 sensor is a SENSOR. It is not a switch. It provides a voltage to the ECM as feedback response to the exhaust gas that it is measuring. The ECM (in virtually all modern road driven vehicles w/ FI) is trying to maintain an air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1. A regular O2 has a range of about 13:1 to 16:1 (keep in mind 13:1 is black smoke rich and 16:1 is melt piston lean). The ECM is constantly making tiny changes (in microseconds) to make the mixture oscillate back and forth across it's target (an incredibly tiny amount) for, among other reasons, to see if the O2's are responding properly. There is another O2 behind each catalytic converter to simply measure the effectiveness of the converter.
There are several wide band O2's made, but about 2 that are commercially sold w/ controllers to operate them (stock ECM's cannot). Most controllers have an analog output to simulate regular O2 performance so one could install a wideband in a stock position. But the primary reasons for adding a wideband O2 is to have a gauge to monitor mixture and datalog because one is making engine mods that will exceed stock programming, hence also the need to be able to make programing changes.
 

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agent provocateur
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now to add one more question to all this....the O2 sensors on the Wings, are they ones with a "HEATED" tip...? Some come as just a O2 sensor...some come with a heater to get them up to temp fast. I am from the old school...working with carbs, and the closest I have come to fuel injection has been working with Diesels...which is a whole other type of fuel injection that takes place with fuel pressures of like 1,000 PSI and going as high as 9,000 PSI as I have heard of on some engines. But there is no O2 sensors...and no computer control anything on the diesels I am use to.
 

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Yes they are the heated type.
 

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An O2 sensor is a SENSOR. It is not a switch. It provides a voltage to the ECM as feedback response to the exhaust gas that it is measuring. The ECM (in virtually all modern road driven vehicles w/ FI) is trying to maintain an air/fuel ratio of 14.7:1. A regular O2 has a range of about 13:1 to 16:1 (keep in mind 13:1 is black smoke rich and 16:1 is melt piston lean). The ECM is constantly making tiny changes (in microseconds) to make the mixture oscillate back and forth across it's target (an incredibly tiny amount) for, among other reasons, to see if the O2's are responding properly. There is another O2 behind each catalytic converter to simply measure the effectiveness of the converter.
There are several wide band O2's made, but about 2 that are commercially sold w/ controllers to operate them (stock ECM's cannot). Most controllers have an analog output to simulate regular O2 performance so one could install a wideband in a stock position. But the primary reasons for adding a wideband O2 is to have a gauge to monitor mixture and datalog because one is making engine mods that will exceed stock programming, hence also the need to be able to make programing changes.
This pretty much sums it up. So, No. One cannot replace a regular O2 sensor with a wide band one. PCM computing power limits capabilities. That being said, the current ecoboost, 5.0L, 5.8L. and 6.2L engines from Ford now have powerful enough PCM's to control fuel using wide band sensors in conjunction with the ability to not only retard timing when knock is detected (which has been done for years now), but to advance timing. This means the engine is able to operate constantly at its best efficiency. Even able to compensate for going from regular to premium fuel without wasting the octane capabilities. Technology is great, but no one can use widebands unless the rest of the system is upgraded to the same level.
 

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agent provocateur
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
UPDATE..... My bike went into the shop as the gas mileage went all to **** over the past 10 or so months. Sometimes better most of the time worse. How bad was it....? I use to get very close to 400 Km's per tank and it dropped to 270 when I was lucky...sometimes even worse. Anyways to make a long story short the O2 sensors are trash....both had to be replaced. The upside is...the bike is still under warranty so no cost to me. Will update you all when I get it home and see how it runs...however have been told it runs smoother now and even ideas better and no more engine stumbles and low RPM stalls.
 

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To make a long, technical story a little easier I would say this. The standard (narrow band) O2 sensor can tell the ECU if the motor is rich or lean. The wideband can tell how much it is rich or lean and therefore make it possible to keep the engine at near perfect stoichiometric. Narrow band varies from rich to lean and hopefully averages out to stoichiometric. You can not just plug in a wideband where a narrow band used to be used.
 
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