Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
With the rear wheel off the ground the drive shaft and final drive gearing lack resistance and often sound 'clunky'. Trying to diagnose a noise by running up the rpm's with the rear wheel off the ground isn't the best way. You might have a problem…. but don't diagnose it this way.
Well put...there's no load on anything. I don't know why, but 06-10 Wings do have some noticable noise at lower rpm which I suppose you could describe as a 'swishing or rubbing'. I've noticed it myself and had several owners (some of whom had earlier wings) comment on it also.

The 1800 tran problems I've fixed (just a couple) were obviously bent shift forks and manifested itself in a very noticable and reliable clunk a second or two after a very lazy shift into second at low speeds. Note that neither one would 'pop' out of any gear at higher rpm, which is THE traditional symptom of a bent shift fork.

Presumedly, you think the noise is coming from the rear end. Are you sure? I come across a maligned left front fork once in a while (left rotor rubs on the caliper bracket). I see warped front rotors occasionally too...the odd part is they don't tend to make the lever pulsate as much as other bikes, making them hard to notice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
I can easily see how that could happen, but that doesn't excuse the mechanic for not catching his mistake. It's difficult to assemble the cases and takes two mechanical people even with the special ring compressors and piston bases. Without those it's a risk breaking a ring. the cases are so close together when the piston ass'y and cylinder are fit there's little room for the 'small screwdriver' technique so you're kind of working blind.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Buying a 'fire sale' engine like that seems like more work and hassle to me than just fixing the engine you have. The parts you need to fix your bike probably aren't all THAT expensive. It's the labor that costs ya. Aside from the sheer volume of parts removal (it's a marathon) and with purchase of a few special tools, an 1800 isn't that hard. I'd do an 1800 over a 1500 any day of the week.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
A really smart (or honest) tech should've noticed that 99 times out of a 100 when assembling the cases...turning the engine over by hand...anticipating the possibility that might happen. I agree the dealership made it right.

There's a strong demand for newer clean GL1800s with lower miles around here. I'd say selling the machine for enough discount to reasonably cover the repair would be better moneywise, and less hassle than parting it out. If I was in the market I would certainly consider a 3k discount on something I knew I could likely fix myself for under a grand.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
456 Posts
Wow Exavid...that seems pretty steep. I think they're telling you they don't want the work. I suppose it can vary regionally but around here you'd probably get quoted a little more than half that...P and L. Of course all estimates are subject to change when the parts actually get inspected. It IS a big job and shops do get 'nailed' with work this time of year...but work is work. I'd think a service manager would be pretty happy with a gauranteed 20 plus hour job any time of year.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top