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Hi all,

I looked at the posts, but if this has been discussed, Sorry, I couldn't find it.
After I ride a while, when I apply the rear brakes, I can feel a pulse, kinda reminds me of a warped rotor on an automobile. But, as soon as I apply the front brake lever, it stops. Is this weird or what? If I put the bike on the center stand, and rotate the rear wheel, their seems to be a high, or warped spot on the rear rotor. Could this be it? Anyone else faced this problem?
Thanks guys for any info you can give.

BamaBoy
 

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Did you recently have the wheel serviced? If so, try loosening lug nuts, and re-torquing with good torque wrench. Some say to use anti-seize. I'm not sure about that. In the bolt industry, it's the general feeling that all fasteners should be lubed, even under heads of bolts. If anything, I'd use Loctite of the blue persuasion. Easy to remove nuts, and lubes at the same time. And, if one does forget to tighten one, at least it won't come off. Perish the thought!! I forget the Caterpillar no. of it, but maybe Loctite 242 blue.
 

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just wondering if the 1800 is like the 1200 and 1500. linked brakes. it may be the front brake that linked to the rear causes the pulsative sensation. and when you apply the front brake. the other side disk will stop the pulsative motion.
 

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William_86, the 1800 does have linked brakes but quite different from the earlier models and quite complicated. They are linked both ways, the front works the rear also and the rear also works the front.BamaBoy, It does indicate a warped rotor but why it stops pulsing when the front is applied I don't know, maybe the pulses get canceled out somehow.
I would not use antisieze or any other lube on the lug nuts but locktite wouldn't hurt anything, they do need to be torqued properly mainly.
 

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Hi Guys,
Sorry it took me so long to reply. Work really gets in the way of Important things!:(

I have ordered new rear pads, and I am going to "attempt" to check my rear rotor.

Saw a rotor on Ebay that had been removed to trike a 2008. But didn't know if it would fit my 2001. Any Thoughts?

Davogd430 you mentioned a torque value for the lug nut, Is this something I would find in my owners manual?


Thanks guys, for your help in this matter. I will let you know how it goes.
 

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If you have ABS, you can sometimes feel a pulse when its working
 

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The maximum allowable out of plane for the brake rotor is .012 This will require a dial indicator to measure the surface of the rotor. For the front you can clamp it to the forks to measure with, for the rear you need to fabricate a simple jig and some spacers to hold the wheel and use a large bolt for an axle.

The proper torque for the rear wheel lug nuts is 80 foot pounds.

The proper torque for the front axle nut is 44 foot pounds.

Torque on the caliper mounting bolts is 23 foot pounds.

I may be wrong in doing so but I use a light coat of anti-seize on all bolts that need to be taken apart on a somewhat regular basis. However I do on occasion also check the rear lug bolts and the front axle just as a regular check on occasion. The anti-seize does lubricate the threads and protect them. And I have never had one come loose.

As a matter of fact I may take the front rotor covers off for good. They are not a good safety thing I think, as one tends to not check the front axle nut.
 

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Hi

I'm not sure that will work I could be wrong but at .012 wouldn't the wheel bearings give up that much play. I'm under the impresion thats why the calipers float to accomodate such free play. I'm not being a wise guy but it doesn't seem that you can check that kind of tollerance on the bike.??

Tom
 

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thessler wrote:
Hi

I'm not sure that will work I could be wrong but at .012 wouldn't the wheel bearings give up that much play. I'm under the impresion thats why the calipers float to accomodate such free play. I'm not being a wise guy but it doesn't seem that you can check that kind of tollerance on the bike.??

Tom
Hi Tom: There is always more to any solution than one statement. The manual and method for measurement for warped rotors takes into account the wheel bearings. If you do gain more than the allowed play, then you have to take the wheel off and place it into a trueing stand. Then you check both the rotor and the wheel bearings.
It is assumed that if you get no more than .012 with the wheel in place that the rotor and the bearings are correct. If you get more than the .012 then it could be either the rotor or the bearings.

I have even used a simple lead pencil. I hold the pencil in one hand very firmly wedged against the bike at some point and spin the wheel with the other or have someone else do this. This is a quick simple way to tell if you need to look further.
 
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